by Andy SmithPosted on

Hell’O, also known as Hell’O Monsters, is a collective of Belgian artists who use individual talents to create work within a cohesive, bizarre fictional world. The trio was born out of Jerôme Meynen, François Dieltiens, and Antoine Detaille meeting in the 1990s, and they populate their works with hybrid beasts taking part in both humorous and bleak narrative scenes. The works shown below are examples of the group’s acrylic paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The laser-cut digital prints and pins that comprise works by David Adey, an artist based in San Diego, can be pulled from hundreds of Web or print outlets. Yet, together, they create cohesive, kinetic pieces like the powerful “Starbirth,” consisting of lips bursting out from the piece’s epicenter. All of the individual pieces are painstakingly pinned to a foam board.

by Andy SmithPosted on

There’s a wild energy to Jon Fox’s work, present even when subjects stand still and stare at the viewer. With Fox’s oil paintings, specifically, the works burst and crack in defiance against the medium. And in each corner, a symphony of apparitions, with Japanese, geometric, and otherworldly influences, offers a new entry point.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The name “Albarrán Cabrera” is a moniker for the Spanish duo Anna Cabrera and Angel Albarran. The photographers have produced work together for the past two decades, showcasing across the world and tackling new challenges and techniques together under one name. And for each new theme, the duo finds away to show each’s singular vision within a broader idea.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

San Francisco-based collage artist Travis Bedel aka Bedelgeuse creates astounding anatomical collages that splice together bones, tendons, and organs with flora and fauna. His collage work, mostly a hybrid of analog and digital techniques, takes on a surrealist quality as human anatomy seamlessly intertwines with crystals, flowers, and feathers. Deeply moved by the mysteries and potentialities of the human body, Bedelgeuse’s work revels in the relationship between humanity and nature.

by CaroPosted on

Clouds of smoke appear to take on strange and beautiful shapes in French photographer Gilles Soudry’s images. He calls them “Volutes”, referring to the smoke’s hazy and spiraling effects, and some have described looking at his work like being transported into a dark otherworld, while others appreciate its cinematic qualities (we saw Donnie Darko’s rabbit “Frank”). Like a sort of x-ray colored Rorschach Test, these reactions to Soudry’s photographs demonstrate his unique ability to mystify his viewers.