by Andy SmithPosted on


Street artists Pichi & Avo bring a blend of surrealism and classic urban art to walls across the world. Within these works, a conversation occurs between what we know as modern street art and iconography and styles of centuries far gone. The Spanish duo, in particular, has been referencing classical mythology in a slew of recent murals that have appeared in Miami, Hawaii, and New York.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Galerie Le Feuvre in Paris, works by Invader are presented in a new show called “Masterpieces.” Invader is the enigmatic street artist known for crafting square ceramic tiles into images that resemble digital, pixelated renderings throughout the past few decades. The gallery says that the show was triggered by “discovery of works dated from 1997.” The artist was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Magazine Vol. 2.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Raquel Rodrigo creates street art using the unlikely process of cross-stitching. The Spanish artist’s works occupy walls and structures in Madrid and Valencia. Whether towering over passers-by or adorning eye-level dividers, Rodrigo and her team craft flowery pieces in the same intricate, painstaking process. All appear as pixelated wonders when closely inspected.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Van Saro‘s current show at La Luz De Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles is called “Concrete Jungle,” and this newest collection hints at his past with street art. Whether it’s using oils on U.S. and foreign currency or adding poignancy and surrealism to street signs, Saro continues to grapple with the concepts of hope and decay in the contemporary experience. Within Saro’s work, governmental iconography is replaced with the faces of children, haunted animals, pop culture references, and instruments of destruction. Saro was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Astro takes flat urban surfaces and creates passageways into the void. Using shadows and light, calligraphy-inspired designs and winding curves, the artist’s optical illusions are made for public consumption. And even when they’re not so obvious to some passers-by and cars on a quick route to work, Astro has many of us looking at the big picture.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Since 2005, Australian artist Buff Diss has been adorning city sidewalks, trains, and industrial buildings through his unconventional use of tape – expanding upon the more traditional forms associated with street art. His body of work incorporates a variety of styles and subject material, from contour drawing and geometric shapes to intricate portraits of mythological figures. Despite the impermanent nature of the chosen medium, the artwork itself leaves a lasting impression on those who are fortunate to see it.