by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While some artists view yarn bombing as purely decorative, Olek (HF Vol. 29) often swathes objects in crochet to draw attention to important socio-political issues. Known for the outspoken messages in her large-scale, colorful work, she was recently invited to create a piece in New Delhi, India for the St+art Delhi street art festival. For her canvas, Olek chose one of the local homeless shelters called “Raine Basera,” which provide people with temporary lodging overnight. With the help of legions of volunteers and donations from Indian fashion labels, Olek beautified the shelter with bright yellow, purple, and red crocheted fabrics that evoke India’s famously vibrant textiles. Though it’s visually alluring, the piece ultimately imparts a sobering message about the reality of poverty in New Delhi — and many major cities around the world.

by CaroPosted on

Revok is set to make his LA debut on April 10th at MAMA gallery space with his exhibition aptly titled “Revok: Los Angeles”. His show already promises the vibrant, geometric forms that Revok has become known for, recently featured in the publication “Revok: Made in Detroit.” On display will be 12 new paintings on assembled wood pieces, a sort of continuation of that series. Here, Revok explores new themes inspired by his newfound home in Los Angeles where he sources his materials.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Montreal-based artist Jason Botkin recently returned from Cancun, Mexico, where he created a series of murals and installations for the second annual Festival Internacional de Arte Publico, a week of art making that took place at the end of February. In collaboration with Jeremy Shantz, Botkin created a series of humorous, mask-like pieces with movable features that viewers could reconfigure a la Mr. Potato Head. Public engagement and collaboration are at the heart of Botkin’s whimsical work. He is a co-founder of the collective En Masse, which invites its members to co-create sprawling monochromatic murals. Though Botkin’s painting style has an instantly recognizable palette and texture, he has no problem adapting his aesthetic to work with that of other artists. Today we take a look at his pieces from FIAP as well as some other recent work.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

We recently reviewed Andrew Schoultz’s solo show at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco, “Blown to Bits,” where he reflected on the chaos of world events through an apocalyptic lens. This past week, Empire Seven Studios commissioned Schoultz to do a mural in San Jose, CA that touches upon some of the same themes. Schoultz is an artist with his personal arsenal of symbolic motifs. In viewing his work across various media — from street art to installations to paintings — cohesive ideas begin to emerge through the recurring imagery. Schoultz juxtaposes symbols of wealth and grandeur — like Grecian vases, tigers, gold coins, and ships — with chaotic line work that resembles explosions. His work signals at a civilization in decline, mired by its own greed and hubris.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Brazilian artists Biciclea Sem Freio have a solo show titled “Fera” coming up on March 5 at London’s RexRomae Gallery, curated by JustKids. The duo met at the university of Federal University of Goiás while studying visual art. They got their start designing rock posters and quickly moved on to creating their personal, collaborative artwork and street art. Nowadays, their colorful, graphic murals have taken them all over the world. Take a look at some of the pieces that will be included in “Fera” as well as some of their recent walls below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

For the upcoming group show “PROTEST” at M16 Art Space in Canberra, Australia, Fintan Magee created a video work based on an ephemeral installation he created in a Sydney warehouse. For the piece, Magee wanted to speak out against conservative bias in Australia’s news media, which he says spreads racism, homophobia, and Islamophobia. He created a wire sculpture and stuffed with with Daily Telegraph newspapers, a publication owned by ultra-rightwing media mogul Rupert Murdoch (who also owns Fox News here in the US). Magee set the sculpture in front of a mural and set it aflame. In a video included below, he explains that the man and dog in the mural represent the master-lapdog relationship between the media and its unquestioning followers. Titled “Man Bites Dog,” the multimedia piece will debut at M16 Art Space on March 26.