by Nick PizanaPosted on

Chicago artist Pose recently rocked an installation in Detroit’s Belt, an alley in the city’s downtown that has been converted into an outdoor art exhibition space, curated by Library Street Collective. Already filled with art from some of the world’s leading street and contemporary artists, Pose has added to the madness with his signature collage of vibrant colors and cartoony textures. See more photos after the jump, courtesy Library Street Collective.

by CaroPosted on

German artists Jasmin Siddiqui and Falk Lehmann, aka “Herakut,” (covered here) have traveled all over the world to paint murals and exhibit their drippy, figurative paintings. Through recent social projects, they’ve shared experiences which have provided the inspiration for their current exhibition, “Displaced Thoughts”. On view at the studio and work space of Urban Nation, the exhibition paints a picture of “displaced” individuals due to persecution, conflict, and human rights violations. Herakut sheds a light on these people and the organizations designed to help them in the Middle East, Europe and Africa with new paintings, photographs and installations.

by CaroPosted on

“An ancient mosaic looks exactly as intended by the artist who produced it over two millennia ago. What else can claim that kind of staying power? I find this idea simply amazing,” says street artist Jim Bachor. Bachor’s current series “Treats in the Streets” fills potholes in his home town of Chicago with playful mosaics of icecream and popsicles. Using the same materials as ancient craftsmen, they are made with thousands of colorful pieces of glass and marble set in mortar which protects each piece. The icecreams are part of an ongoing project where the artist takes pothole suggestions from his fans online, and then fills them with images of things like fish, candy, cereal, french fries, and words like “pothole.”

by CaroPosted on

Last week, Okuda San Miguel aka “Okuda” teamed up with fellow artist Yoh Nagao (featured here) in Berlin, Germany to create two vibrant new murals. The first is curated by international art project Urban Nation,  which can be found at their gallery location, and is Okuda’s abstract reinterpretation of the city’s symbol, “Berolina.” The Madrid based artist found inspiration in the statue that once stood in Alexanderplatz in honor of the victorious troops of the Franco-Prussian War. Originally, she wore a crown of oak leaves which Okuda has replaced with the famous Berlin Wall. This mural was followed by the duo’s second piece, “From Goya to Nagoya,” a private commission.

by Sponsored PostPosted on

Denver’s Black Book Gallery presents exhibits two artists this month; Martin Whatson and Hama Woods. “About Face” is Oslo artist Martin Whatson’s first solo show in the United Sates. The series features work created to push the viewer to accept change. He gives context to the chaotic nature of graffiti while using it as an element on social commentary, humor and destruction. Studio mates with Whatson, Hama Woods Hama Woods’ The Grey Area” will be her first solo exhibit outside of Norway.

by CaroPosted on

Italy based street artist Teo Pirisi, known as “Moneyless”, is constantly seeking to evolve his already abstract style of work. For his last major solo exhibition (covered here), he sought inspiration in geometrical shapes and patterns. These, he feels, are the fundamentals of life that at their core represent a multitude of possibility. As such, they appear throughout his graffiti writing, painting, drawings and found object installations. For his current exhibition, “Fragmentations,” at BC Gallery in Berlin, Moneyless reduces this concept to its most simplified form.