by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Miron Milic has always believed that nothing is sacred and that there are no untouchable subjects or themes that art shouldn’t or couldn’t address. So the first thing that came to mind when the Zagreb, Croatia-based artist entered the world of street art was to paint a self portrait. Aware of the culture of anonymity in street art, he instinctively wanted to go against the grain, baring himself with an almost mocking image. Painted on a small electric plant in a busy residential neighborhood of Zagreb, this piece illustrates Miron Milic’s artistic ideals in a nutshell.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While it’s tempting to call what Jorge Rodriguez-Gerada does “street art,” his Terrestrial Series isn’t experienced in quite the same way as a mural. He recently unveiled two gigantic pieces — one in San Antonio, Texas and one in Paris — that can only be comprehended fully from a bird’s eye view. Viewers on the ground have a unique access point of being able to walk through the portraits, which form a cohesive whole only from above.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Rimon Guimarães is a young, Brazilian artist who has painted murals across the world, visiting locales such as the Netherlands, France, and Gambia to leave pieces of his work behind. Guimarães’ works typically feature mask-like characters and bright colors and patterns — perhaps an homage to the prevalence of African diasporic traditions in his native country. Indeed, the pieces he created in Gambia look right at home, juxtaposed with local women passing by in their exquisitely patterned dresses. His work exudes happiness and adds vibrance to any urban setting.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

You might remember Maser from our coverage of Justkids’ “Life is Beautiful” festival in Las Vegas. There, the artist covered an entire motel with bold, diagonal stripes, turning the entire building and its parking lot into an Op Art-inspired installation. Maser is originally from Ireland, where he got his start (and nickname) from the graffiti scene in Dublin in the 1990s. Now based in the US, he still frequently works outdoors, though his style has morphed from traditional graffiti to expansive environments that he is able to achieve through the careful arrangement of just a few colors.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Hailing from the outskirts of Sao Paulo, Brazil, L7M began making art as a child. Spray paint, his preferred medium for street art, entered his life at the age of 13, and he quickly became proficient in it while also experimenting with china ink, latex, pastel, and acrylic. Currently, L7M spends his time traveling the world to paint murals that feature birds fractured into a flurry of colors and abstract shapes. Neon colors dominate his compositions, with varied styles of paint strokes that add depth to the abstract color fields. Recently, L7M traveled around Europe to put up new pieces. Take a look at his new street work as well as a few paintings from his studio below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Based in Mexico City, Curiot (featured in HF Vol. 29) creates phantasmagoric paintings where deity-like monsters traverse the clouds. The silhouettes of tiny people floating in their wake reveal that human beings look like mere playthings in comparison. Last weekend, Curiot debuted his latest solo show, “Down the Rabbit Hole with Neon Lights,” at San Francisco’s FFDG, as well as a downtown mural curated by Fifty24SF, another local gallery. According to FFDG, the new paintings in Curiot’s exhibition allude to the rapid pace of technology and the consequential environmental pollution. His creatures travel through a mysterious continuum to attempt to reach the “vortex of souls,” only to get sucked into the past where they must confront their previous wrongdoing.