by Sasha BogojevPosted on

A riot cop covered in flames in the middle of the street, Claude Monet’s poppies swallowed by a hole in the sky, and a large ship tearing up the Earth’s surface, leaving a bloody scar behind it- these are images Pejac recently shared on his Facebook page, where he just announced his highly anticipated solo exhibition in London. Known primarily for his striking “public interventions”, works that cleverly mix illusion and reality, fantasy and familiarity featured here, the Barcelona based street artist is once again moving his work from the public arena and into the gallery.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

We’ve already seen murals and graffiti turned into a moving image with a simple, stop-motion animation. From Blu’s elaborate 7-minute video “Muto” (Silent) to INSA’s captivating graphic based “gif-ffiti” series, featured here on our blog, the idea of bringing life to walls has been a challenging one that street artists have enjoyed for years. What we haven’t seen yet is a photo-realistic mural turning into animation, and Croatian artist Lonac did just that as an early Valentine’s day treat.

by CaroPosted on

Cleon Peterson portrays the brutal struggles between an army of warring figures in his monochromatic illustrations reminiscent of Grecian pottery. Previously featured on our blog here, the Los Angeles based painter and muralist juxtaposes a bold use of minimalism and clean lines with the chaos and violence that exists in today’s world. He is unafraid to show the ugly side of human nature, and yet Peterson chooses to see his work as more of a mirror, where looking at our own reflection can have the power to inspire change. Peterson celebrated his solo debut in Hong Kong last night with the opening of his pop-up solo exhibition, “Purity”, in cooperation with local arts organization, Over the Influence.

by CaroPosted on

For many artists, painter’s tape is a handy tool used to draw perfect shapes and outlines that are revealed when the tape is removed- but for Berlin based artist collective known as “Tape Over”, the tape sticks. Using tape as their preferred drawing material, founding artists Lamia Michna and Robert Konig began first experimenting with tape art in 2011 at Berlin’s electro night club scene, eventually moving their work onto large-scale installations all over the world. Though much of their work is focused on indoor and outdoor murals, they prefer to be called tape muralists over street artists.

by CaroPosted on

Street artist Franco Fasoli aka “JAZ”, covered here on our blog, has long been inspired by his native Latin American culture and its chaotic history, as it relates to his own personal life. His dynamic and colorful images of muscular figures, hybrid animals and mythological beings are often used as stand-ins for the different and overlapping societies that he has observed throughout his career, and as a Mexican-Argentinean artist. In his final mural of 2015, JAZ traveled to Madrid where he painted one of his most introspective murals to date.

by CaroPosted on

Yok is an Australian born artist raised on Ren & Stimpy and skateboarding graphics, while Sheryo is a Brooklyn based Singaporean artist with an affinity for kitsch and pulp illustrations. Together, the New York based duo calls themselves Yok & Sheryo, whose equally cheeky love for counter culture is reflected in their art. We first featured their murals on our blog, where they combine their signature styles in frenzied images that include surreal characters and motifs like pizza and palm trees. Their collective works tell stories inspired by their travels and misadventures, which have recently taken them to the islands of Indonesia, sparking ideas for a new set of characters.