by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A few weeks ago, we gave readers a small taste of the many, enormous murals that went up at We AArt Festival in Aalborg, Denmark (see our coverage of Aryz, Escif and Kenor’s walls here). The festival was envisioned as a way to bring more public art to the mid-sized city and featured international artists with a penchant for large-scale work that Hi-Fructose readers will recognize. Interesni Kazki, a duo from Ukraine known for their storybook-like murals, split up and tackled two separate walls. Puerto Rican artist Alexis Diaz typically draws inspiration from the natural world for his depictions of hybridized creatures. His piece for We AArt depicts a skeletal horse encased in an armor of tree branches with an ink-like technique atypical of outdoor work. Other artists included Jaz, Liqen, Don John and Fintan Magee. Check out photos of the murals below.

by CaroPosted on

When we first heard from Spanish artist David de la Mano, he was just wrapping up a mural at Djerbahood Street Art festival, one of the world’s largest. Since then, he’s been to Madrid, Cardiff, and Wales- home to his latest mural with Sheffield based muralist and artist Phlegm. He has also painted murals in Montevideo (Uruguay), Sadnes and Stavanger (Norway), Buenos Aires (Argentina), Lima (Peru) and Florida, just to name a few. De la Mano doesn’t consider himself a “street artist”- he’s first and foremost an illustrator with work in the street. In his own words, he’s an “explorer of human behavior”, represented in masses of people, their conflicts, and visual contradictions.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Known for his uplifting, large-scale photographic portraits of ordinary people, French artist JR recently travelled to New York’s Ellis Island for a site-specific project on the famed historical site. The island once housed the largest immigrant processing center in the nation, filtering millions of newcomers to the States from the 1890s through the 1950s. Ellis Island now houses an immigration museum, though parts of it have been left untouched. JR was invited to reinvigorate the destitute, abandoned buildings on the island’s south side with his project “Unframed — Ellis Island,” opening to the public on October 1.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Amsterdam-based collage artist Handiedan recently visited Berlin to add her contribution to Urban Nation’s Project M, arguably one of the coolest buildings in the German capital. The arts organization has been inviting artists to create window installations and large-scale murals (see our coverage of Eine’s recent piece there) and Handiedan recently made her mark on the multi-story facade with an enormous, wheat-pasted mural. While her typical work consists of smaller-scale, textured collages of vintage pin-up girls with baroque flourishes, she seamlessly adapted this style to a larger format. Check out her piece and stay tuned for more coverage of her upcoming solo show “Vesica Piscis,” opening at Seattle’s Roq La Rue this Thursday.

by Ysabelle CheungPosted on

Road trips, the first sunsets (and sunrises) of the fall, a few beers, abandoned houses and a group of artists — that pretty much sums up the flurry of activity that took place at Salton Sea recently. The “accidental” lake (engineers originally dug an area for faster irrigation) in the Colorado Desert in Southern California was the setting for friends Eddie Colla, 2wenty, Nite Owl and Caratoes, who all made their mark there with signature work.

by CaroPosted on

Dabs Myla’s oddball characters, Rime‘s vivid colors and Persue’s trippy paintings all share an animated style- and tend to tread sensitive topics. On Saturday night, their worlds collided in “Touchy Subjects” at The Seventh Letter gallery in Los Angeles. Co-existing in the same space, it was almost like a scene out of toontown in In Who Framed Roger Rabbit. Everything comes to life in a remarkably fun way, but it’s also slightly dangerous, erratic, and yes, touchy. More after the jump!