by Andy SmithPosted on

Noah Harris and Andy Biddle are the duo behind “Salvation,” a stop-motion film made entirely with found objects that tells the story of the creation of Earth, the evolution of mankind, and the impending end. All of these narratives are told using items found in flea markets and other thrifting spots, with all motion done in-camera.

by Andy SmithPosted on


A new stop-motion short film takes influence from the work of Hi-Fructose Vol. 41 cover artist Greg “Craola” Simkins. The 5-minute “I’m Scared,” directed by Pete Levin, is a whimsical, yet gripping children’s tale put into motion. The C4toons Entertainment short’s models adapt the exaggerated style and content created by the Los Angeles-based artist into the narrative’s characters.

by CaroPosted on

The last time we featured sculptor Jessica Laurel Louise, aka Jessica Dalva, she was exploring a ritualistic narrative with her feminine works. In the two years since, her art has developed to reflect a multitude of personal interests and skills; her hand-painted sculptures, shadow boxes, drawings, and recently, clay animation, collectively exhibit a cinematic taste. Communicating movement has become an important focus for Dalva. She keeps a diary of her excursions at her blog, from her travels to studying animal anatomy at Natural History Museum, and drying scarves in the wind. These have had a noticeable effect on her artwork. Read more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

About 30 seconds into one of Jake Fried’s hand-drawn animations, you’re hit with the sense of how much time it took the artist to draw each frame of these intricate, multi-layered works. Fried works with a combination of art supplies and household materials: ink and gouache are paired with coffee and white out. Try doing such minuscule, detailed line work with the tip of a white out pen. Those things were not designed for the type of precision Fried somehow manages to elicit from them. View the animations after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

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When Insa presents his street art GIFs to people, they often think that he went back on Photoshop after painting a piece and animated it digitally. However, what the artist refers to as GIF-iti is painted entirely by hand, one frame at a time. Each layer of the artwork is photographed at a specific time of day to keep the lightning consistent, resulting in a moving mural created by way of stop-motion animation. Insa recently painted such a piece in Paris on a billboard along the River Seine. Painted over the course of two days (in the rain, mind you), the final, moving piece we see here was created using eight layers and 72 total skulls painted at different angles. The colorful work is titled “C’est La Vie” — a tongue-in-cheek name considering the subject matter. Check out some process shots after the jump.