by CaroPosted on

Photos by Mik Luxon

On July 25th, Hi-Fructose attended the opening of Peter Gronquist’s solo exhibition “All of the Above” at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. As recently discussed, the artist has embarked on more abstract and conceptual explorations than in previous works. For this exhibit, he chose to expand on multiple recurring themes in his art, and techniques using more varied color, form, depth and stillness – and with surprising results. Gronquist’s paintings, for example, are created using sanded plexiglass over hand-painted drop boxes, creating a foggy, luminous effect. This process flattens the image to the surface while simultaneously dropping the image back. Gronquist says, “It’s hard to explain without seeing in person, I best describe it as a glowing effect.”

by CaroPosted on

Last year, Portland based artist Peter Gronquist made a remarkable departure from his dramatic taxidermy sculptures in favor of more abstract explorations. He continues to experiment with color and form in his latest body of work for “All of the Above”, opening on Saturday at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles. The show expands on his 2014 exhibition “The Great Escape” which featured infinity boxes of holographic war planes and firearms, a recurring motif in Gronquist’s art.

by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Zio Ziegler (covered here) has an eclectic style; a few of his pieces portray Cubist figures, some more detailed than others, and then there are his more color-based paintings. His art is not cohesive, but rather reflects on his every day life’s emotions and moods which flow between feelings of self awareness and bliss. He very much lives in the moment. Ziegler’s current solo exhibition at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles, “The Psyche’s Gestures,” takes a look at these different sides of the psyche.

by CaroPosted on

Berlin based artist Jaybo Monk (previously featured here) is the architect of an abstract world in his paintings. Human figures, which he likens to “cathedrals”, are split apart, masses of muscle and shapes swimming around the canvas that leave us feeling disoriented. Combined, they provide the backdrop for a landscape with no boundaries, a place Monk calls “nowhere”. His current exhibition “Nowhere Is Now Here”, which opened last night at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles, explores this concept of wandering, both literally and metaphorically.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The selfie and the woven tapestry are just about as disparate as two media can get. While the former is snapped quickly and effortlessly to join a stream of endless images, the latter is created through a painstaking process that beckons a more thoughtful viewing than mindlessly scrolling through Instagram. Erin M. Riley subverts our image consumption habits — and the hierarchy of types of images in general — with her hand-woven tapestries, which she bases on selfies of anonymous women found on the internet. Riley culls her source imagery from social media, taking throwaway, low-res photos and cementing them into handmade, physical objects with a much longer lifespan. The artist will present her latest body of work, “Something Precious,” at Soze Gallery in Los Angeles in February 21.

by CaroPosted on

Artist duo Gosha Levochkin and Devin Liston have made a name for themselves as DevNgosha, combining their backgrounds in illustration and fine art. Years after their first collaboration, Soze Gallery is showcasing their individual talents in side by side solos “GROWN UPS” and “LOST” (previewed here). As collaborators, they’ve come up with a system of working together and creating, where one starts a piece and the other finishes it, and vice versa. Now abandoning that system, we can see Liston and Gosha are artists who like to play with varying aesthetics.