by Andy SmithPosted on

“Sawdust provocateur” AJ Fosik crafts totem-like wooden sculptures influenced by taxidermy, rituals from varying cultures, and folk art. He’s also one of three artists crafting installation projects at SCOPE Miami Beach‘s atrium (Dec. 4-9), marking Hi-Fructose’s 14th year in publishing. Fosik was the cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 18 and was last featured on HiFructose.com here. Below, he talks to us about what’s ahead:

by Andy SmithPosted on

The elaborate distortions created by Hong Kong-based sculptor Johnson Tsang continue to evolve, with a recent showing at Giant Year Gallery of works from his “Lucid Dream” series. Tsang was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and he was recently featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 46.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The “live sculptures” of Roman Ermakov combine fashion, fine art, and installation work, each offering an energy and vibrancy powered by the humans bearing his works. These creations from the Moscow-based artist enliven both the runaway and public spaces. His recent work, as shown, takes influence from the costume parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s, where these artists’ radical ideas in architecture and sculpture were also channeled.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Alex Chinneck’s recent work, the sculptor bends and warps otherwise stubborn objects to his will. “Growing up gets me down” is a working oak grandfather clock “knotted” by Chinneck. “Birth, death and a midlife crisis” was an indoor sculpture that “tied a 450-year-old column in the German museum of Kirchheim Unter Teck.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Bisbee, who welds and manipulates 12-inch spikes, has always operated under one mantra: “Only nails, always different.” In recent pieces, his diverse output bends the nails into an enormous snake, a tree, and more abstract forms. Not only are the subjects depicted varying wildly, but the style in which the nails comprise them: sometimes rigid and geometric, elsewhere chaotic.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Beverly Mayeri’s ceramic figurative sculptures become canvases for surprising, surreal scenes. The Bay Area artist also uses this opportunity to make connections between humanity the broader world around us—as well as more abstract concepts. In a statement, she explains her process and influences: