by Andy SmithPosted on

Delphine Bonnet’s ceramic figures reveal inner worlds, with components that only at first appear as organs. Elsewhere, the artist creates stoneware creatures that appear at once apart of our own natural world and from another dimension entirely. The form offers an ancient quality to her works, further rooting them in the mythologies that inspire her.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using the unexpected material of spaghetti, designer-artist Alice Pegna creates elegance and striking pieces adorning mannequins. Her series, “Ex Nihilo,” features ongoing experimentation that encompasses headdresses, dresses, and objects. The strands’ rigid, uncooked form allows the artist to craft geometric designs, culminating in the bold final result seen below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Taking influence from Byzantine art and other eras of religious art, Aleksandar Todorovic renders contemporary tech figures as religious icons and social media symbols as sacred, in egg tempera and acrylic. Elsewhere, his painted and sculpture works look at consumerism and contemporary global politics. He recently displayed this works under the title “Religion Remastered.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Multidisciplinary artist Melissa Meier combines sculpture, photography, and other forms with surreal—and at times, visceral—results. Whether it’s the wearable, egg-filled sculptures in her “Skin” series or the unsettling masks in “Glass-Eyes,” Meier is able to create otherworldly looks tethered to the natural world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Casey Curran‘s kinetic sculptures consist of wire, aluminum, motors, sculpted brass, cranks, or other materials, yet resemble organic objects in essence. The artist, hailing from Washington, crafts his intricate works with the cycles and shapes of nature in mind, yet each sculpture doesn’t seem to draw from any one creature or floral element.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sandra de Groot crafts soft armor and ornate headpieces in her macramé “kNOTs” series. When the works adorn models, they are activated in a way that appears both regal and fantastical. Each piece feels independent of any one place or time.