by Andy SmithPosted on

Ellen Jewett’s handsculpted and handpainted “natural history surrealist sculptures” add surreal and sometimes-whimsical touches to wild creatures. Her recent works include the fantastical “the burden of motion and ambition” bear, which seems ripped from its own narrative, and the winged “”of illumination and empathy.” Jewett was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kate MacDowell‘s handsculpted, porcelain creatures and plantlife look at both the vulnerability and power of the natural world. The artist says she choses “porcelain for its luminous and ghostly qualities as well as its strength and ability to show fine texture.” MacDowell is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 boxset.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The surreal sculptures of Samuel Salcedo add both distortion and vulnerability to the human form. The Spanish artist plays with texture and scale, creating intimacy in both nude figures and massive faces adorning gallery walls. Most of the pieces carry humor: All of them are packed with bare humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jannick Deslauriers uses textiles to create ghostly, massive sculptures. Whether it’s a time-worn car or a cityscape, her works appear as structures that can be passed through. She uses darker threads as her “pencil outlines,” blending textures and techniques to create pieces that resemble little else.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ronald Gonzalez’s “Heads” series, combining found objects, metal filings, glue, wire, wax, and soot over welded steel, is a collection of haunting sculptures. The artist, based in upstate New York, is able to pull from several cultures and time periods in creating these strange works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Each year, the Falles celebration honors Saint Joseph in Valencia, Spain, with festivities and enormous monuments burnt during the final day of the affair in the town square. This year, Okuda San Miguel created a massive work for the event injecting contemporary, vibrant style. And last night, Okuda’s “Falla” was set ablaze. (Okuda was last featured on HiFructose.com here, and he was the cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 43.)