by Andy SmithPosted on

Brian Tolle’s startling sculptures are said to be a dialogue between “history and context.” His ability to manipulate what appear to be the most stubborn of structures is more than just a clever use of materials such as styrofoam and urethane (as is th case in the top piece, “Eureka.”) Tolle forces us to consider our own relationship with the materials around us.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hirofumi Fujiwara’s isolated sculptures are called Utopians, each person actually an amalgamation of features and cultures. Many of these characters, said to be from a parallel world, are presented inside of barriers as they “bear witness.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The remixed and altered porcelain sculptures of ceramicist Penny Byrne often have a political edge. Byrne’s methods recall the methods of Barnaby Barford and the late Click Mort. She uses enamel paints, epoxy resin, putty, and other materials to evolve these found statues.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Amy Brener’s “Omni-Kit” sculpture series, everyday objects and imagery are reprocessed into totem-like sculptures that speak to ritual and memory. These works are highlighted in a new show at Jack Barrett Gallery titled “Consolarium,” a word the artist created for the place where these objects and figures across time collide into these single objects. Materials include urethane resin and foam, silicone, pigment, and more. The show runs through Dec. 20.

by Andy SmithPosted on

CrocodilePOWER is a Moscow-based duo who craft dystopic yet vibrant installations, sculptures, and paintings. Consisting of artists Peter Goloshchapov and Oksana Simatova, the pair works in materials like fiberglass, porcelain, wood, moss, iron, and more. See some of their recent, startling visions below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Max Hooper Schneider’s lush sculptures and installations, his experiences in marine biology and landscape architecture prove to be ever-present influences. His Hammer Projects exhibition at Hammer Museum in Los Angeles is immersive and packed with too many details for one viewing, packed with found objects amassed over several years. The exhibition runs through Feb. 2 at the museum.