by Andy SmithPosted on


Famed sculptor/installation artist Richard Wilson creates “architectural interventions,” in which otherwise everyday building faces and structures are shifted in dreamlike fashion. Through brilliant engineering, the artist takes the elements of our day-to-day experience inside and outside in ways that may seem impossible at first glance.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armed with pliers and wire, Claude-Olivier Guay creates transforming sculptures that mimic organic matter and various creatures. The artist, living and working in Quebec City, uses video to show how his creations can evolve. In these pieces, winged insects and birds can emerge from skulls and our bodies can transform into wild, woodland animals.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Obesity was once synonymous with wealth in China. That idea has evolved into a more Western equation of excessive weight gain to the unhealthy and the undesirable. Sculptor/painter Mu Boyan places a different lens on this with his series of obese figures in varying situations. His so-called “Fatty” series appears to comment on this complicated standard. At once vulnerable and exhibitionist, full of absurdity and full of humanity, these sculptures place characters in several unlikely situations, mostly in the nude.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Primarily using newspapers and tape, Will Kurtz creates everyday, life-sized people and animal companions. The artist, a native of Flint, Michigan, is able to convey flourishes of realism, even with these unlikely materials. The artist, now based in Brooklyn, says his work hinges on capturing moments in time.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Bovey Lee, a Hong Kong-born, Los Angeles-based artist, uses cut paper to create miniature worlds. These intricate cityscapes and forms, made from Chinese rice paper on silk, contain differing scenes at every corner, allowing new viewing experiences at each distance observed. Often, works like “The Tightrope Walker” feature only one, tiny portion of the work directly reflecting the name of the title, while a busy world surrounds it.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tina Yu, a Chinese-raised, New York-based artist and designer, creates hand sculptures, which are used as pendants. These polymer clay pieces are painted with acrylics, and they move between delicate reflections of nature’s flora and fauna and something much bleaker.