by Andy SmithPosted on

Linda Cordell’s ceramic sculptures offer familiar creatures and figures, yet many carry a darker edge. Much of Cordell’s work depicts the animal kingdom, in varying states of tension or external conflict. Most sculptures carry the natural color of porcelain, with pops of bright hues that mark points of interest (or impact, depending on the piece).

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese artist Hirotoshi Ito, also known as Jiyuseki, creates unlikely sculptures out of stones and rocks, injecting humor and surprise into a seemingly stubborn material. In some works, life is bursting out of the stone, like his popular pieces revealing a human mouth smiling behind a metal zipper. In another, the source is hidden inside what appears to be a melting ice cream bar.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese artist Tomohiro Inaba creates sculptures that appear to disintegrate into the air. His steel wire animals and human figures appear as apparitions in the galleries they inhabit across the world. For Inaba, the imagined space created by his works are a vital component.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jordan Griska’s “Wreck,” consisting 12,000 pieces of mirror-finish stainless steel, was created over two years. The Brooklyn-based sculptor crafted the reflected piece with several motivations in mind.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lisa Roet has worked closely with scientists for the past two decades, fueling an artistic interest in primates. The physical manifestation of this passion has appeared outside and inside cultural institutions across the world. She explores the place of apes, monkeys, chimpanzees, and gorillas in the world through sculpture (both traditional and inflatable materials), photography, works on paper, and other multimedia projects.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Calgary-born artist Maskull Lasserre creates improbable sculptures that defy their materials and challenge the viewer’s expectations. His “Schrodinger’s Wood,” made from Ash tree trunk, a chain hoist and gantry, appears as a rope tethering one piece to another, as rendered by the artist. And even when the truth of its material is revealed, the piece still offers tension in its “breaking.”