by Andy SmithPosted on

Geng Xue’s ceramic sculptures, with their traditional coloring and textures, appear as beings evolving and emerging from our shelves. She’s used these creations in multimedia exhibition and even filmmaking, animating them into mythology-inspired narratives. As she creates representations of humanity, Xue seems to be reflecting on our own fragility.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a major installation at Tolarno Galleries in Melbourne, Christopher Langton built his own immersive system of celestial bodies, robots, and organisms resembling viruses and fungi. “The hyperreal manifestation of Langton’s own recent experiences beset by life-threatening disease and infection, ‘Colony’ beckons us to consider that we are all multi-cellular symbiotic organisms, negotiating a precarious shared ecology,” the gallery says.

by Andy SmithPosted on

With “Le Souffle de Changement,” Pierre Matter offers a surreal, contemplative set of sculptures crafted from bronze and recycled objects. The exhibition currently inhabits one of the AFA Gallery-curated spaces at Château Belcastel in France. In the process of creating these works, Matter uses “welders, plasma cutters, laser cutters and grinders to shape and sculpt,” AFA says. The exhibition runs through October.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Aspencrow’s hyperrealistic figurative sculptures blend the provocative with pop. Blending materials like resin, fiberglass, and silicone, his works serve as both admiring and wry portraits. The artist was born in Lithuania and moved to England to attend Birmingham City University, School of Art.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Michael Craig-Martin’s sculptural practice, he creates enormous versions of everyday objects that appear as though they were drawn. In a show ending this week, he offered new works in this vein at Gagosian’s Britannia Street location in London. This was the first time works in this series were shown indoors.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In her recent sculptures, Qixuan Lim, also known as QimmyShimmy, continues to meld everyday objects with disconcerting elements. Her recent project, created for an upcoming show at Beinart Gallery next month, inserts one of her realistic organs into dumplings. Or as she says: “For those who wonder why your wontons are so wrinkly.” Her sculptures are crafted in polymer clay.