by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian sculptor Maurizio Cattelan has been a force of satire and provocativeness for the past few decades in the art world. He’s turned heads with sculptures of Pope John Paul II struck down by a meteorite, a praying Hitler in a former Warsaw Ghetto, and a taxidermied squirrel moments after suicide by self-inflicted gunshot. A new documentary, “Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back,” explores the life of the controversial artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Inside a Charlotte studio, a hundred faces peer in different directions. These are the unsettling, yet engrossing sculptures of Dustin Farnsworth, a current resident at the McColl Center for Art + Innovation. As the artist prepared for his upcoming show, titled “Tell Me More,” he spoke to Hi-Fructose about his latest, massive works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The 164-acre park at North Carolina Museum of Art’s Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park gains a few new occupants this spring, in the form of two enormous sculptures. Jaume Plensa’s “Awilda & Irma,” a twofer, steel mesh set of heads, and Jaime Hayon’s interactive, rocket-like “SCULPT. C” were recently installed at the museum. On April 21, NCMA marks installations with the event Hoopla: Party in the Park.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lana Crooks uses hand-dyed wool to craft the insides and outsides of the natural world. From a distance, these pieces appear to constructed of fur and bone. But upon closer inspection, the artist’s meticulous blending of wool, found objects, and other fabrics comes into focus. Crooks sometimes uses actual specimens from Chicago’s natural history museum collections for inspiration in making her “faux specimens and soft curiosities.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative

Australia-based artist Joshua Smith taught himself to create absorbing, hyper-detailed miniatures of structures and objects strewn across cities. These works maintain the grounded, authentic erosion of urban environments. Many of the buildings are rundown or at the very least, aged appropriately. “His miniature works primarily focus on the often overlooked aspects of the urban environment such as grime, rust, decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti perfectly recreated in 1:20 scale miniatures,” a statement says.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chun Sung-Myung creates surreal, figurative installations full of sculpted characters often having the artist’s own face. These dreamlike situations move between distress, somberness, and a broader vulnerability. The characters, representing part of the artist’s own psyche, often exist in modes of solitude or surrounded by otherworldly creations.