by Andy SmithPosted on


Much of Ahrong Kim’s vibrant ceramic sculptures are reflections of what happens inside our minds. That cacophony comes through in surreal forms, patched together in a strange, yet somehow cohesive sculpture scene. The artist creates both functional objects and progressive forms under this mindset.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stockholm-based artist Joakim Ojanen crafts pastel-colored characters that seem to be varying ages at the same time, while playing with perspective. He accomplishes this in both 2D and 3D, using oil portraits and stoneware sculptures to bring his visions to life. Above, one towering character is given even stranger depth in bronze.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mari Shimizu’s dolls contain worlds. The Japanese artist crafts surreal, disconcerting figures whose torsos are often hollowed and reveal views into scenes ripped from mythology. The work is both a new transformation for the classical doll and a nod to the centuries-old nature of the toys.

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Ron Mueck gathers 100 individual, enormous skulls for a new installation at National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial. The sculptures in “Mass” are crafted from fiberglass and resin, and each is about a meter high. Mueck’s hyperrealist work was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

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Christopher David White says that “human is to nature as skin is to bark – as roots are to veins.” The artist’s striking ceramic sculptures attempt to reconcile humanity’s rightful relationship with the natural world, one long abandoned for consumption and convenience. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yinka Shonibare MBE blends fiberglass figures, Dutch wax-printed cotton fabric, metal, handpainted globes, and more to craft sculptures that explore race, economics, and other social issues. The artist’s mixing of textures, materials, and cultural iconography offers complexity past an initial scan. He was last featured on HiFructose.com.