by Andy SmithPosted on

Chun Sung-Myung creates surreal, figurative installations full of sculpted characters often having the artist’s own face. These dreamlike situations move between distress, somberness, and a broader vulnerability. The characters, representing part of the artist’s own psyche, often exist in modes of solitude or surrounded by otherworldly creations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Deborah Simon, a Virginia-born, New York-based artist, creates sculptures that explore “the reality of the animal and the vulnerability imbued in toy.” Though her sculptures appear to be taxidermy, series like “Flayed Animals” are made entirely from hand. She uses materials like polymer clay, faux fur, acrylic paint, wire, foam, glass, and embroidery materials to create these animals, mostly focusing on bears.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Netherlands-based artist Pim Palsgraaf created both 2D and 3D work that tackles urbanization and the effect “development” has on the world around us. His “Multiscape” series, in particular, is informed partially by the artist living in the industrial part of Rotterdam. The series highlights the “outgrowths of urban architecture.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Czech artist Richard Stipl began his career as a painter, before moving on to the unsettling figurative sculptures for which he’s now known. The artist, based in Prague, conveys varying emotions and uses both two-dimensional and three-dimensional ideas to wrestle with humanity. A statement maintains that the work toils with the idea of creating art in itself. Materials used include oil on wax, ink on wood, clay, silver leaf, and several other tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Michele Oka Doner‘s long career has produced bold sculpture, works on paper, and public art that engrosses in both its appreciation of the natural world and innovation. Her figurative works, in specific, use partially formed and seemingly organic parts to inspire awe. Many named for gods and goddesses, these particular works feel at once godly and incomplete or reflections of our limitations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nick Ervinck, a Belgian artist, creates studio sculptures and massive installations that take modern approaches to manipulating material and space. The artist’s work can distort the familiar or create something wholly new in this process. He uses surprising sources in crafting his imagery and textures, from organisms found in nature (both prehistoric and current) to inkblots, Japanese pop culture, and our own bodies.