by Andy SmithPosted on

Akishi Ueda’s surreal sculptures meld creatures and structures in unexpected ways. The artist pulls from both fantasy and science in building his clay creations. And around each corner of the piece comes a surprising bit of life, tucked inside the contours of his strange animals.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Campbell’s sculptures crafted from cut currency reveal grim spectres. In his current show at Over the Influence Hong Kong, titled “Using All The Freedoms We Have,” new works are presented. Campbell was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether in volcanic fields or Arizona deserts, Jym Davis creates masks that reflect the land in which they were made. Davis, who has been invited to be a National Park artist-in-resident multiple times, then displays these creations against the terrain that inspired them. The artist has described myself as not only a sculptor and photographer, but a “myth builder.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Rosa de Jong‘s “Micro Matter” series, the sculptor and art director crafts miniature structures that appear to be ripped from the earth. The artist uses varying materials to craft these buildings and landscapes, including cardboard, tree bark, thread, watercolor paint, and plastic. The work is both suspended and placed in capsules, offering a 360-degree view of de Jong’s sculptures for viewers.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jamie Winn’s automaton sculptures are both eerie and humorous, often reanimating deceased creatures and depicting nighttime animals. Often using watercolor on wood and custom lighting, there’s also a vintage quality to much of the New Orleans artist’s work. And even as still images, the sculptures are striking.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Surreal and haunting, Yuichi Ikehata creates works that begin as figurative wire sculptures and garner new life via digital flourishes. The Japanese artist’s meticulous process ensures that it’s difficult to tell which parts of the structure are part of the tangible framework. The final product, though elegant, seems to convey a world in which we’ve lost and eroded ourselves to technology.