by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A careful collector of found objects and (ethically sourced) animal bones, Jessica Joslin creates delicate sculptures that gracefully encase skeletal remains in baroque ornamentation. Using antique metals from chandeliers, samovars and other Victorian-era relics, Joslin gives the creatures whose bones she utilizes a dignified appearance even in death. Her work is both decorative and visceral, as her intricate craftsmanship belies her haunting subject matter. The artist recently created a new body of work for her solo show, “The Immortal Zoo,”opening October 24 at the non-profit gallery Firecat Projects in Chicago. Watch a teaser video and check out our preview of her latest work below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Though research has emerged linking excessive social media use with anxiety and depression, our collective internet addiction shows no sign of slowing down. The fictionalized, digital selves we present to the online world comprise the bulk of some people’s social interactions. Australian artist Robin Eley interrogates the divide between one’s physical and digital identity in his new show “Prism,” opening at 101/Exhibit’s Hollywood location on October 18.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Rather than drawing a line to separate his personal and commercial work, LA-based artist Wayne White (featured in HF Vol. 19) brings the two full circle with his latest exhibition, “Invisible Ruler,” at NYC’s Joshua Liner Gallery. White has extensive credits as a set designer, puppeteer and director (he won multiple Emmys for his work on Pee-wee’s Playhouse), and his puppetry informs his oeuvre in both two and three-dimensional media. The title of the exhibition, according to the artist, alludes to the ways previous creative pursuits impact artists for the rest of their careers. Techniques learned in one medium come through in others in unexpected ways.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Like tiny movie sets that recall the color-coded cinematography of Wes Anderson, Marc Giai-Miniet’s sculptural dioramas reinterpret real-life, utilitarian settings. The artist (who we introduced on the blog recently) builds doll house-like architecture that evokes factories and workshops, turning these industrial spaces into whimsical settings filled with strange objects that seem precariously organized. Each room is stuffed to its brim, and it takes time for the eye to traverse the different compartments of each piece. While Giai-Miniet is a recognized artist in his native France with a long career behind him, he will debut his first US solo show at NYC’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery on October 11, “Théâtre de la Mémoire.” Take a look at some of his new works for the exhibition below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While some artists seem to explore themes that come to them through spontaneous inspiration, Scottish-born, London-based artist Charles Avery has devoted his career over the past decade to an imaginary, nameless island. His sculptures, drawings, installations and texts — even if seemingly unrelated — culminate in the description of a specific, fictional world like an anthropological study. Over the course of his work from 2004 to today, details about the island have revealed themselves. In fact, its fate isn’t so different from many other countries formerly under British rule.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

London-based illustrator and artist Martin Tomsky turns the dancing line of the pen into dynamic sculpture with his multi-layered woodcuts. In one artwork, several wood pieces in varying degrees of brown are cut into swooping arabesques and lain over one another to create the essence of a whirlwind. At the center, a cube is trapped inside a slightly larger box. A larger-than-life insect with menacing fangs watches over the heart of the piece, as if protecting Pandora’s box. In his illustrations, Tomsky invents fantasy worlds where good and evil battle one another in nature. The same thematic oppositions can be seen in his woodcuts. Trees and clouds meld into one another to create a single ominous sky-canopy. In the darkness below, owls hide in trees, supposedly from the giant bearded millipede that wraps itself around a central tree trunk. The ground below, sprouting with mushrooms and speckled with unknown creatures, is as petrifying as the sky above.