by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Ignacio Canales Aracil presses flowers using voluminous molds that shape them into fragile vessels with a colorful, lace-like surface. Even as the seasons change, his process preserves the essence of spring. With their full forms intact, the flowers have a liveliness to them, even as they transform into these manmade shapes. Canales Aracil recently exhibited at Museo Sorolla in Madrid and currently is part of a group show on view through February 28 at Galeria Lucia Mendoza in the Spanish capital, as well.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

An avid enthusiast of mythology and cartography, Toronto-based artist Bailey Henderson sculpts the fearsome sea creatures depicted on medieval and Renaissance-era maps. She brings her bronze sculptures to life with acrylic paint and powdered pigment, creating dimensional versions of the mythical beasts sailors once feared. There’s Ziphius, a bird-faced orca rumored to slice boats in half with its dorsal fin; the cockatrice, a rooster-dragon known to kill by breathing on its victims; and the pinniped, a dog-like seal with protruding tusks. Henderson’s work is often whimsical and humorous, and brings with it a bit of history that makes it all the more fascinating.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jacob Dahlgren treats stacks of pencils like blocks of wood in his sculpture series, “Subject of Art.” With each unit sharpened to a different length, the pencils stack on top of one another to create playful, geometric shapes with an Op Art element. Though the forms are quite simple, Dahlgren’s choice of medium makes the series a whimsical exploration of how one can reconfigure basic shapes to creates something new.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Italian artist Gianluca Traina blurs the boundaries between photography and sculpture with his “Portrait 360″ series. The artist shoots photos of anonymous subjects, zeroing in on their faces. Using a warp and weft technique (a method of weaving often used in traditional carpet-making), he weaves the 2D images into three-dimensional busts. The blurred, digitized photos become further distorted when Traina toys with their orientation, creating a continual interplay between the photographed and sculpted faces.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Last weekend, Santa Monica’s Copro Gallery debuted their exhibition “Conjoined V,” guest curated by artist Chet Zar. True to Zar’s own dark, surreal aesthetic, the annual sculpture show features a variety of emerging and established artists with a penchant for all things creepy, curious, and bizarre. Kazu Tsuji’s gigantic, silicone bust of Salvador Dali, Jessica Joslin’s metal-adorned taxidermy animals, and surreal imaginings by Craig LaRotonda and Jim McKenzie are among the myriad of bold and pop culture-inspired works in the show. Take a look at some highlights from “Conjoined V” below and see it in person through February 14.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Graham Caldwell’s glass-blown, welded sculptures gleam like insect eyes, refracting the viewer’s reflection into myriad distorted parts. The Washington D.C.-based artist works with hypnotizingly shiny surfaces, which he arranges into shapes that resemble various natural processes. In one piece, teardrop-shaped glass vessels explode from a central point like a flower blossom. In others, irregular, prismatic arrangements of multi-colored glass coalesce into crystal-like shapes. While Caldwell’s work at times evokes the natural world, his final products are sleek and oftentimes look manufactured despite his hand-done processes.