by Andy SmithPosted on


Zadok Ben-David, a London-based artist, chose a direct title for his latest body of work: “All the people that I saw but never met.” Yet, when you see the crowd of sculptures amassed by the artist, the work takes on a metaphysical quality. Each of the individuals, created from painted stainless steel and perspex boxes, represents a distinct personality and a new, potential relationship that never was.

Wilfrid Wood’s Engrossing, Hilarious Sculptures

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Wilfrid Wood, the East London-based sculptor, crafts absorbing, occasionally hilarious faces and figures from paper mache, plasticine, and polymer clay. Whether it’s Mark Zuckerberg, 2016 Olympians, or less public figures, there’s both humanity and vulnerability in Wood’s work. Since the end of the satirical television show “Spitting Image,” on which Wood worked to help craft the heads in the puppet program, the artist has worked as a freelance sculptor.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Australian artist Amanda Parer has her sights set on a global invasion with her dramatic, illuminated sculptures. Her oversized, inflatable creations have been exhibited across the world at a variety of festivals, museums and public spaces. On her website, the artist shares that her work aims to “explore the natural world, its fragility, and our role within it.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Every year, on the first Sunday of September, the Dutch village of Zundert holds its “Bloemencorso Zundert”, or “Zundert Flower Parade”, featuring larger-than-life floats and an “explosion” of flowers. The giant structures, reaching up to 30 feet tall, are built by volunteers in neighboring village districts and church villages – each one competing for the title of best design. Read a brief history of the parade and view more photos behind the cut.

by Andy SmithPosted on

After visiting the Chinese village where generations of his family had lived, sculptor Warren King decided on an ambitious, new body of work: One individual at a time, he would recreate the residents of his grandparents’ community using just cardboard and glue. The life-sized figures help the artist connect with his cultural and ancestral heritages, each its own emotion and moment in time. The backs of the figures are exposed, allowing the viewer to see their interworkings and hinting at the unfinished nature of history.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Australian-born, Los Angeles-based painter Mark Whalen is known for works that exhibit both a dark humor and vibrancy, mirroring the duality of Western living. His current show, “Around the Bend,” fills Australia’s Chalk Horse Gallery with examples of this charge, with disparate, vague figures rendered in struggle.