by CaroPosted on

Nicki Crock is a conceptual artist currently working in Columbus, Ohio, but her head is in the clouds. Her installation series “Dream House” transforms space into an ethereal, geometric floating dreamscape made out of white paper. “A dream house is something to aspire to and long for,” she says. “What better form could a daydream take shape in, than with something that we, as humans, already use to fulfill our imaginations: clouds.”

by CaroPosted on

Patti Warashina is a Pacific Northwest based artist known for her imaginative ceramic sculptures that are full of wit and sarcasm. At age 76, she does not stop inventing. Featured here on our blog, her clay figures are usually placed in fantasy environments, where she uses sculpture to explore such themes as the human condition, feminism, car-culture, and political and social topics.

by CaroPosted on

Carole A. Feuerman’s hyperrealistic sculptures of graceful human subjects like swimmers, divers, and dancers, featured here, are undeniably lifelike. But they are also magical in their dreamy state. Her sculptures also capture something that isn’t real in the tangible sense, and that is the soul and emotion of a living person. Some call it “super-realism”, but in Feuerman’s words: “My sculptures combine both reality and illusion- I’m idealizing the human form, its not life as it really is.”

by CaroPosted on

Melbourne, Australia based artist Alex Sanson began sculpting in the early 90s with a series of small, toy-like sculptures greatly inspired by Alexander Calder’s circus, a pioneer of moving sculpture. Since then, Sanson’s repertoire has developed to include both small scale and gigantic kinetic works, some interactive and activated by touch, others hand-operated. His wildly imaginative works have taken Calder’s original output and brought to it a new sense of play and movement.

by CaroPosted on

He teaches digital media at Los Angeles Harbor College, but that doesn’t deter sculptor Joshua Abarbanel from appreciating a strong tie to nature. His incredible wood sculptures are a reflection of his dual interests in technology and the natural world. Using mix of digital, mechanical tools and handiwork, he first designs his dynamic pieces on the computer, then crafts them by hand in way that feels organic. Recent works combine influences from Romantic landscape, environmental art, and wabi-sabi.

by CaroPosted on

Laura Keeble is a London based artist whose works often use unconventional materials, many with references to consumerism and the contemporary art market. Her recent sculpture series interprets familiar, commonly seen objects and global brand logos using reclaimed church stained glass: Starbucks cups, McDonalds happy meals and CCTV cameras are just a few of the objects that she has cut from original antique church windows, made fantastic and divine with this stunning, discarded material.