by Margot BuermannPosted on


In what the artist himself calls “homespun faerie tales”, Jon Rappleye blends imagery found in art history, literature, biology, and folklore to portray the cyclical nature of life and death. Ranging from surreal paintings to mixed media sculptures, his works draw from the detailed illustrations of James John Audubon and hallucinatory worlds of Salvador Dalí. And while his subject matter can be grim at times, the artist renders it in such a way that it becomes beautiful and enchanting.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The personal work of Brooklyn-born sculptor Dave Cortes is forged from varying types of woods and precious metals. These pieces, whether a dramatic face distorted from brute force or a quieter, grotesque mediation, “represent an encapsulated moment of inspiration,” Cortes says. The artist has created commercial work for DC Comics, Sideshow Toys, Toy Biz, and MacFarlane Toys.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


French ceramicist Juliette Clovis creates beautifully strange sculptures of women that blend elements of myth, nature, and feminine form. Placing special emphasis on technique and aesthetics, the artist applies cut Limoges porcelain to simple female busts, transforming them into mesmerizing new species that draw from various wildlife and flora. Through the process of mutation, these hybrid creatures become vehicles for exploring feminine identity in relation to the natural world.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Jorge Mayet’s miniature floating sculptures serve as compelling metaphors for the artist’s complex relationship to his native country. Mayet was born in Cuba, yet has been living and working in Mallorca, Spain as an expatriate. Despite the circumstances, his sculptures are devoid of any intentional political statement. Instead, they explore the artist’s personal experiences with exile and displacement, and the powerful nostalgia for one’s homeland left behind.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The surreal sculptures, installations, and photographs of Dutch artist Guda Koster subvert fashion and create entirely new worlds with its elements. Considering herself more sculptor than photographer, each of these images begin with a live experience that has been constructed, cut, sewn, posed, and then photographed with a timer, as the artist is often present in the pieces.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Andrea Myers is an artist and self-described “maker” based in Ohio. Blending forms of sculpture, painting and fiber arts, she creates collage-like sculptures, wall hangings and installations that explore the space between the two- and three-dimensional. Her works also reflect her deep interest in the process of manipulating “flat” materials, such as fabrics, felt, wood and paper, to create dynamic, multi-dimensional works of art.