by Andy SmithPosted on

Tina Yu, a Chinese-raised, New York-based artist and designer, creates hand sculptures, which are used as pendants. These polymer clay pieces are painted with acrylics, and they move between delicate reflections of nature’s flora and fauna and something much bleaker.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Meredith Dittmar, a sculptor living Portland, uses polymer clay to create intricate structures that draw lines between technology, biology, and our own consciousness. Hidden within geometric shapes, vanishing lines, and architecture, simulations of the familiar emerge, like faces and hands. Depending on how the viewer focuses and chooses to be present, new aspects of the work are revealed. Dittmar was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Los Angeles-based Kiel Johnson has created suits, miniature cityscapes, and cameras with cardboard. Yet, one of his most recent sculptures emulates something even more unexpected: an aircraft. Johnson was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 14, and in 2013, we featured his crowdsourced cardboard robots.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Gosia, a Poland-born, Toronto-based sculptor, creates feminine figures with touches of the surreal, whether reflecting the natural world or expressions that extend from inside of the characters themselves. Each of these sculptures contain both elegance and emotional complexity, often containing a new sense of drama at each angle. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Japanese artist Takako Yuki’s fantastical ceramic art evokes both feelings of whimsy and uneasiness, with beings that seem birthed from fairytales and the natural world. These often-child-friendly creations contain flourishes of sadness and strangeness. The artist says that there are several emotions at play in the process of forging these works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese sculptor Kunihiko Nohara’s creations are often engulfed in clouds and mists, yet each is created with a single piece of wood. These pop-surrealist creations can vary in size, with some looming over passers-by and others small enough to be held. All evoke the viewers’ own dreams and fantasies, as they offer a portal into Nohara’s own.