by Andy SmithPosted on


Máximo Riera, a Spanish artist, creates pieces of furniture that pay homage to the natural world. An example of this is seen in his lifesized, fully detailed versions of rhinos, frogs, walruses, bison, and more are made to order, taking a total of 480 hours for each piece. The animal and chair portion are created from polyurethane, while the seats come in leather with a steel internal frame. The artist has also made furniture from millenarian olive tree wood, along with geometric, metallic framing that presents a mix of the organic and the contemporary. The nature of the material makes each of these unique. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Adam Parker Smith, a sculptor and installation artist based in New York, creates works that offer different insights at every perspective. His sculptures, made from resin, fiberglass, steel, and preserved mylar, emulate party balloons, recalling the work of artists like Jeff Koons. Yet Smith exposes the hollow innards of his work at different angles, and calls upon inspiration from centuries past.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lene Kilde, a sculptor based in Norway, creates works in which disparate body parts create fanciful scenes. At first glance, these sculptures may appear ominous or bleak, but further time spent with the work offers hints at wistful and youthful action. Or as Kilde says in a statement,“her intention is to invite the audience to use their own imagination so that they can complete the sculptures and fill in the lines and volume by themselves.The sculptures consist (of) concrete, metal mesh and air.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


David Jien’s works on paper and sculptures blend modern pop culture and video games with historical iconography and imagery. These hyperdetailed works can feel both mythological and like a Nintendo RPG. The Los Angeles-based artist uses colored pencil and graphite on his paper works, along with occasional use of holographic film and other elements that add to their otherworldly nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the Kaitlyn Schwalje sculpture “Unfit for Consumption” appears to tell a parable of some sort. The top of the piece scene seems serene, with grazing boars and a strange liquid form taking shape. Yet, a more ominous narrative forms when one looks below. The truth is that Schwalje’s sculpture has even stranger, yet real-world origins.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Famed sculptor/installation artist Richard Wilson creates “architectural interventions,” in which otherwise everyday building faces and structures are shifted in dreamlike fashion. Through brilliant engineering, the artist takes the elements of our day-to-day experience inside and outside in ways that may seem impossible at first glance.