by Andy SmithPosted on

Anne Mondro uses thin steel and copper wire to crochet part of the anatomy, each carrying both an unsettling texture. Her work is described as exploring “the physical and emotional complexity of the human body.” The artist also crafts digital prints that reflect on the connections between humans.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using video work and other technology, Maarten Baas creates clocks that appear to be inhabited by men who appear to be manually keeping time, each actually a 12-hour recorded performance being displayed. He’s created these in varying scales, from human-sized grandfather clocks to the major project Schiphol clock, located international terminal of an Amsterdam airport.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matthew Monahan uses materials like paper to craft decidedly human and vulnerable sculptures. The artist’s entire practice uses a variety of materials. What carries through in each of his works is his penchant for conveying people in unexpected ways.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The frozen textiles in the outdoor installations of Nicole Dextras appear as reflections of the natural world. In her “IceShifts” series, her process has a particularly Victorian effect, as she replaces the head and extremities of a human with plant matter. The result is both haunting and elegant.

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Sun-Hyuk Kim’s sculptures may resemble manipulated tree limbs, yet the artist’s work is in welding and cutting metal wires and pipes. The result are ethereal figures that impress on any scale. The South Korean’s startling creations have appeared in gallery and museum shows across the globe.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paola Idrontino‘s massive textile sculpture “Evanescent” depicts the scourge of coral bleaching in the world’s oceans, brought on by climate change. The work, which took years to complete, was recently on display at Museu del Disseny de Barcelona. Idrontino’s practice includes textiles, wearable art, and photography.