by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Probably one of the best people to go thrifting with, Hoda Zarbaf utilizes recycled fabrics and old furniture to hand-stitch ornate sculptures. Using sexuality and humor, Zarbaf interrogates representations of womanhood through abstract forms. There’s her chair sculpture with a vulva-like cushion, Vaginal Rapture, with rainbow shapes exploding out of it like an epic moment of release. Another piece, Down-time, features a dominatrix-like woman reclining on a big cushion. Farsi text on her back alludes to her sensitive heart, which contrasts the stereotypes that come to mind because of her tattoos and fishnets. Zarbaf’s work delves into women’s intimate moments and emerges with a three-dimensional portrayal of varied experiences.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

If the Addams’ family’s Thing multiplied and mutated, it would resemble something like Alessandro Boezio’s sculptures. The artist works in clay and fiber glass to create creepy-crawly anatomical forms that remix the human body. Boezio is particularly fascinated with hands and feet, often mingling digits and limbs in unholy ways. Though there’s nothing particularly explicit about his work, seeing severed hands standing up by themselves without a body attached is enough to make our skin crawl.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While Dirk Staschke’s past work has had a meticulously polished look, his latest series of sculptures for his upcoming solo show, “Executing Merit” at Seattle’s Winston Wachter Fine Art, reveal the rough-hewn edges of his process. Staschke (whom we featured in HF Vol. 23) creates opulent ceramic still lifes that evoke 17th-century vanitas paintings. In his previous pieces, he labored to conceal the evidence of his hand-executed process. His latest work, however, juxtaposes pristinely glazed forms with unglazed, unrefined surfaces, exposing the craft behind Staschke’s typically immaculate work. “Craft and skill have always been important in my work and by examining this further my recent sculptures have become an exercise in relinquishing control,” wrote Staschke in his artist statement. “Executing Merit” opens on March 3 and will be on view through April 15.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Minneapolis-based artist and designer John Foster makes sparkling glass objects that look well-suited for the homes of fairies and mermaids. Interested in the geometric structures that govern various natural phenomena, Foster creates iridescent prisms that, when grouped together, cast brilliant reflections in the surrounding space. The artist works in a variety of media, including sculpture, painting, and installation, and seeks to use geometry as a way to change the ways viewers interact with the spaces around them.

by CaroPosted on

Now on view at Merry Karnowsky Gallery in Los Angeles, Johnny ‘KMNDZ’ Rodriguez and Nicola Verlato’s dual exhibitions paint uniquely personal pictures of conflict. There is no universal definition of what it means to struggle; whether we are emotionally conflicted with ourselves, or there is some form of friction between cultural groups, as in Verlato’s works. Interestingly, both artists portray this with symbols of weaponry. View more of their new works after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

For years, Raúl de Nieves has blurred lines between fine art and fashion design, positioning himself as an inspiration for the likes of Vogue and Lady Gaga. He is perhaps best known for his beaded shoe-sculptures, crafted in a rainbow spectrum matched by his figurative painting. De Nieves makes his debut in Los Angeles tomorrow with “I’m in A Story”, at MUSEUM as RETAIL SPACE (MaRS). Inspired by his native Mexican folklore, Catholic symbolism and fairytales, the exhibition loosely adapts two stories; Colin Self’s chamber opera The Fool (which starred the artist) and the episode of Saint George and the Dragon.