by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata places sculptures in front of paintings to create wondrous scenes inspired by childhood. They play out every day encounters between his child subjects, their pets and imaginary friends with the world around them. While their lives may seem ordinary for the most part, Ohata’s playful and impressionistic style make them feel like fantasies. They are sculpted from polystyrene which are then painted to perfectly match their traditional 2D acrylic backgrounds.

by CaroPosted on

José Luis Torres is an Argentinean artist currently living in Quebec who builds largescale works out of salvaged objects. He’s set up public art installations and sculptures all over the world, using everything from antique doors, window panes, to assemblages of brightly colored plastic as his materials. Often, his works have an overflowing effect as they burst from existing environments and architectural structures. His latest work entitled “Overflows” is a part of the 2015 Passages Insolites (Unusual Passages) event in Quebec City’s Old Port.

by Nick PizanaPosted on

The brutal paintings of Cleon Peterson (covered here) have a visceral effect on the viewer, plunging them deeply into a world of chaos, ruin and violence. On August 29th, Peterson brings his iconic style to Detroit’s Library Street Collective for his latest exhibition, “Poison.” “The show is about revenge, which is a current of poison running through our culture and other cultures around the world.” Peterson shares. “It’s often a motivation for war and a justification for punishment. It is a social impulse that is destructive and easy to be complicit in.” Peterson is deliberate in his unflinching presentation of the darker side of human nature. In this world, muscle-headed brutes cross swords and knives, locked in a cycle of aggression.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Alien meets House of Wax in Matthew J. Levin‘s melted, mutilated statuettes. The spine-chilling creatures have glistening skin stretching over elongated bones and folding over protruding ribs. Many objects appear organically self-actualized; as if the creatures emerged alone out of a solid substance. Though their appearances may be repulsive, Levin’s method of positioning his small-scaled creatures in dance-like movements imbues them with a sort of grace and unearthly beauty.

by CaroPosted on

Kyoto based artist Teppei Kaneuji creates bizarre multimedia works that examine the mass consumption of his culture. He is perhaps best known for his Manga-inspired characters made of objects like plastic food, toys, scissors, and furniture parts. This is a fascination that has followed him since childhood, when he enjoyed playing with blocks and putting together everyday objects. Opening September 10th, Kaneuji will make his US solo exhibition debut at Jane Lombard Gallery in New York with “Deep Fried Ghost”. The exhibit showcases the artist’s five most notable series from 2002 through today: “White Discharge”, “Muddy Steam from a Mug”, “Teenage Fan Club”, “Ghost in the Liquid Room”, and “Games, Dance, Constructions, (Soft Toys)”, in addition to new pieces created for the show.

by CaroPosted on

We previously featured Australian artist Matthew Quick’s paintings of well known monuments, titled “The Accidental Empires” here on the blog. Inspired by the rise and fall of historical empires, the artist took these symbols of power and made them more personable by portraying them with everyday objects. He continues this concept with his latest series of oil paintings, “Monumental Nobodies”.