by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

London-based illustrator and artist Martin Tomsky turns the dancing line of the pen into dynamic sculpture with his multi-layered woodcuts. In one artwork, several wood pieces in varying degrees of brown are cut into swooping arabesques and lain over one another to create the essence of a whirlwind. At the center, a cube is trapped inside a slightly larger box. A larger-than-life insect with menacing fangs watches over the heart of the piece, as if protecting Pandora’s box. In his illustrations, Tomsky invents fantasy worlds where good and evil battle one another in nature. The same thematic oppositions can be seen in his woodcuts. Trees and clouds meld into one another to create a single ominous sky-canopy. In the darkness below, owls hide in trees, supposedly from the giant bearded millipede that wraps itself around a central tree trunk. The ground below, sprouting with mushrooms and speckled with unknown creatures, is as petrifying as the sky above.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

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Dutch artist Harma Heikens (featured in HF Vol. 13) is not afraid to use loaded imagery. Her upcoming show at KochxBos Gallery in Amsterdam, “All Is Fair in Love and War,” toes the line between provocative and profane with a new series of confrontational, human-scale sculptures that touch upon taboo themes such as sexual abuse, violence, media saturation, hate groups and religion. The exhibition coincides with the release of her new book Sculptures, which features a foreword by Hi-Fructose co-editor-in-chief Annie Owens.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Azerbaijani artist Faig Ahmed draws from the rich tradition of Middle Eastern carpet weaving to spin surreal creations that seem to defy physical laws — and the staticness of cultural relics. Sometimes his carpets appear to melt, their patterns dissolving into a pool of swirling colors like an oil slick, and other times they become three-dimensional, rising up in sharp spikes that defy the two-dimensional form. These are not carpets to be walked upon. Since we introduced Ahmed on the blog last May, he has created a new body of work that will debut at Cuadro Gallery in Dubai on September 14. A unique space in Dubai’s financial center, Cuadro is a non-profit gallery where Ahmed recently completed an artist residency. Take a look at some photos from Ahmed’s studio and his new works below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A new evolution of his menagerie of mutants, Nicholas Di Genova’s solo show “Ultima” is currently on view at LE Gallery in Toronto through September 27. Since we featured the artist back in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, he has developed a new series of drawings and sculptures that bring to life his vision of hybridized species. Naturalistic diagrams explain in logical steps the genealogy and behaviors of parrot-men and shark-birds. While his drawings are flat and sometimes cartoon-like, his equally whimsical sculptures add another dimension to his visual vocabulary. Take a look at some works from “Ultima” below.