by CaroPosted on

First featured in HF Vol 34, artist Click Mort takes vintage ceramic figurines and “recapitates” them into whimsical characters spawned from his imagination. In his latest series on view at La Luze de Jesus Gallery in Los Angeles, the artist takes influences from his own dreams and nightmares. His exhibition “Delirium Tremens” is named after a psychotic condition typical of withdrawal in chronic alcoholics, which often involves hallucinations. Considering this, while his works are infused with nostalgia and humor, one cannot ignore a certain melancholy in them.

by CaroPosted on

Throughout human history, stories about wild and elusive giants have been told on almost every continent. Iceland-based French multimedia artist Philip Ob Rey has reimagined such monsters in a photo series of sculptures made of VHS tapes. Rey created “V” HS Project, a set of 5 series of black and white photos and accompanying short films, in contemplation of the future of the human race. Set against the gray skies of Iceland’s landscape, the photos portray nightmarish figures wandering a cold and post apocalyptic world.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Multimedia artist Hilary White (covered here) creates vividly colorful sculptural works that delve into the symbolic, the altered, and the literal exploration of the “now” within the framework of time. White has an upcoming two-person exhibit with Hannah Stouffer, whom she originally found out about through social media. White found that Stouffer’s range of material and aesthetic to be something she immediately connected with, and set in motion the beginnings of what would eventually become the exhibit titled “Ingress Egress” which opens July 24th at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. 

by CaroPosted on

Patricia Piccinini is an Australian artist known for her unsettling sculptures of hyperrealistic hybrid creatures. Her work began as a review of biotechnology such as genetic manipulation, but has developed an emotional context over the years. For example, in her sculpture “The Long Awaited”, Piccinini seeks to form a relationship between the creatures and viewer on an empathetic level. The piece is currently on display in her exhibit “Relativity”, the first major survey of the artist’s sculptural works in Europe coinciding with Galway International Arts Festival.

by CaroPosted on

Swedish artist Susanna Hesselberg’s latest work plummets deep into the ground Alice-in-Wonderland-style. “When My Father Died It Was Like a Whole Library Had Burned Down” (named after Laurie Anderson’s song “World Without End”) is a mind bending reproduction of a library inherited by the artist from her father, created for Denmark’s Sculpture by the Sea exhibition series. The biennial festival, which closed on July 5th, boasted 56 site specific installations along the Danish coast. Hesselberg’s mysterious contribution is vertical tunnel framed by a piece of glass that allows viewers to peer into a dark tower books only visible by their spines. Hesselberg wanted to recreate the depth of loss or losing control, as one might experience when a loved one dies.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Luke O’Sullivan (previously featured here) creates three dimensional art that brings the worlds of drawing and sculpture together. Inspired by dystopian science fiction films, O’Sullivan builds environments composed of peculiar buildings and subterranean lairs. Using textured façades as well as screen-printed surfaces, his latest series of works entitled “Cool Shelter” creates a fantastical scene of overworld and underworld labyrinths. The artist will present his latest series on Friday, July 24th at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Hi-Fructose was invited to have a special exclusive preview into Luke O’Sullivan’s latest layered industrial landscapes.