by Andy SmithPosted on

Korean ceramics artist Maeng Wookjae creates strange animals and figures that feel both familiar, yet disconcertingly outside the realm of reality. Yet, the artist’s work may be more tethered to our own world than one would imagine. In a statement, he details his thought process in engaging with the viewer, saying one “not only intellectually comprehends the work but also viscerally appreciates it if their preconceptions are challenged or senses other than sight are stimulated.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

AJ Fosik, a self-described “sawdust provocateur,” crafts wooden sculptures that appear as totem-like beasts, extending from the wall with a spiritual vibrancy. The artist counts taxidermy, rituals from varying cultures, and folk art as influences in these pieces. The nature of how the pieces stand or are mounted to walls, in particular, references taxidermic practices. His work adorned the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 18.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mario Mankey, a Valencia-born artist, creates large-scale installations and murals that feel at once comical and bleak. His recent installation at The Haus in Berlin, titled “Ego Erectus,” is indicative of this. The massive feet, which extend from the ceiling of the room, dwarf viewers and hint at an ever-present burden of humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using silicone, wood, resin, actual hair, and marble, Mexican sculptor Ruben Orozco crafts realistic depictions of famous figures. Created in varying scales, these entrancing figures have gone viral for their eerie reflection of humanity. He’s created sculptures depicting Frida Kahlo, Pope Francis, and other historical figures. The work may remind you of other sculptors of realistic figures, like Ron Mueck and Kazuhiro Tsuji.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Francisco Pereira crafts strange creatures and vessels in bronze, extracting and blending familiar elements for something new entirely. In his world, animals that typically walk on all fours are bipeds, and their new, long legs give them an alien appearance. The Venezuelan sculptor works in scales vary greatly between works that tower over or are dwarfed by viewers.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Radke‘s carved figures teem with creepiness and absorbing detail. He offers a collection of new characters in the show “Home at Last” at Haven Gallery in Long Island, New York. The show’s figures evolve Radke’s longstanding fascination with the unsettling, each new work carrying both grace and a sense of magic. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.