by Andy SmithPosted on

The disturbing, dreamlike figures of Cajsa von Zeipel are crafted in mixed media. The artist’s practice moves between polished, bronze creatures and ones created with materials like resin, fiberglass, plaster, styrofoam, steel, synthetic hair, wood, and more. Many seem to be involved in their own narratives, experiencing feelings of terror, ecstasy, or in transit.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Katja Novitskova‘s recent, massive installation, “Invasion Curves,” the artist offers an environment with creatures taken straight out of nature and the laboratory. The recent exhibition at Whitechapel Gallery offered a fictional landscape facing a “biotic crisis” (or a period of mass extinction), “where imaging and technology are used in a process of mapping the exploitation of life,” the gallery says.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using steel rebar, chicken wire, plaster, wax, acrylics, and other materials, Rebecca Ackroyd constructs pieces that play in both figurative and abstract themes. The artist’s practices moves between mixed-media painting and sculpture, the latter producing beings exploring space and gender.

by Andy SmithPosted on

When Spenser Little bends wire, an assuming material can become an elaborate tapestry. His narratives and figure studies range from playful to absorbing in their manipulations of form. At times, the artist will leave continuous wire works in public spaces across the world, toying with the contours and lines of street objects.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jason deCaires Taylor has spent more than a decade crafting underwater sculptures that create living reefs, improving the surrounding ecosystem at a time when 40 percent of coral reefs have disappeared over the past decades. His recent pieces including 48 life-sized figures in Indonesian waters and a recently installed an initial phase of his underwater art museum, The Coralarium. Taylor last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Toshiya Masuda’s ceramic sculptures simulate the building blocks of pixels, creating everyday objects. The Japanese artist has been pursuing this fascination for several years with works that appear to be ripped from a classic 8-bit video game, predating Minecraft’s bolstering of the aesthetic.