by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

Boston based artist Janet Echelmen (previously featured here) has created one of her most dramatic works yet, but you won’t find it in any gallery. Her latest aerial sculpture hangs half an acre above Boston’s Rose Kennedy Fitzgerald Greenway. Titled “As If It Were Already Here”, the piece weighs a whopping 2,000 lbs, made of 542,000 knots which Echelmen wove together into a colorful, graceful mesh. Take a look at more photos after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

Figurative and boldly colored, Christina West makes sculptures that combine both serious and playful subject matter. Often, she employs scale to disorient her viewer and emphasize a certain sense of isolation. West contradicts their feeling of quiet loneliness with her loud palette. She paints her sculptures in a hot pink or bold white, a reference to the classical figures that inspire her. Take a look at her latest series, “Intimate Strangers”, after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Wookjae Maeng creates ceramic sculptures filled with animal characters. Often gathered together in stylized arrangements, Maeng’s works utilize the shapes of these creatures in surreal ways that bare little resemblance to nature. This disorienting effect is intentional: One of Maeng’s goals is to make his viewers consider humans’ impact on the environment and the way we often thoughtlessly manipulate nature to suit our own ends. “In my work I hope to provide an opportunity — however brief — for modern man to consider the realities of the environment in which he exists, even as he continues his daily existence indifferent to it,” he says.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian artist Shane Wilson draws his inspiration from the nature surrounding him in north Ontario. In his artist statement, he writes, “I live through my hands and tools: transforming thick, heavy bone and bronze, meant for massive collisions, into ethereal, otherworldly creations; precious oases in the midst of life.” Sourced ethically, his ornate carvings into animal antlers, particularly moose, are unreal. They balance the beauty of the animal with the severity and aggressive nature of the antlers’ former life. With careful workmanship, Wilson summons tiny, peaceful scenes of Canada’s wilderness, such as Grizzly bears fishing and wolves howling in the night.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

With his sculptures of multitudes of identical, disaffected, middle-aged men, Isaac Cordal critiques modern society’s emphasis on work and productivity. In our contemporary capitalist system, everything is thought of as a potential way to make profit — like public universities, which are becoming increasingly privatized and unaffordable here in the United States and in countries all over the world. This is the subject of Cordal’s latest piece, “The School,” where he imagines a university as a nightmarish factory with a skeletal overlord shouting instructions from a watchtower.