by Andy SmithPosted on

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga’s “post-human” sculptures and installations reflect on humanity’s vulnerability. His “Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Zachary Eastwood-Bloom takes the idea of adding digital-like glitches to traditional sculptures to a visceral level. He created most of these sculptures while he was sculptor-in-residence at Pangolin London. He uses both digital and analogue means to craft the final product, unifying several disciplines for a startling end result.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bruno Weber was a master of crafting fantastical creatures, and there’s no greater example than the 220,000-square-foot sculpture garden bearing his name in his native Switzerland, visited by thousands each year. Inside this magical park, nestled in Spreitenbach and Dietikon, visitors can scale and interact with its inhabitants. Here, artist Angie Mason shares photos from her recent visit there.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tracey Snelling’s installations are immersive blends of sculpture, video, and photography, her makeshift buildings containing surprises in their windows and corners. Her recent, massive construction at the 58th Venice Biennale reflects on her experiences living in China, in particular. Videos shown within offer peeks into her experiences with friends; structures are inspired by actual places she visited.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Delphine Bonnet’s ceramic figures reveal inner worlds, with components that only at first appear as organs. Elsewhere, the artist creates stoneware creatures that appear at once apart of our own natural world and from another dimension entirely. The form offers an ancient quality to her works, further rooting them in the mythologies that inspire her.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using the unexpected material of spaghetti, designer-artist Alice Pegna creates elegance and striking pieces adorning mannequins. Her series, “Ex Nihilo,” features ongoing experimentation that encompasses headdresses, dresses, and objects. The strands’ rigid, uncooked form allows the artist to craft geometric designs, culminating in the bold final result seen below.