by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

German artist Tobias Rehberger’s work is all about illusion. His installations transform rooms into Op Art-inspired, immersive environments that trick the eye. Criss-crossing, black and white patterns flatten the three-dimensional spaces, confusing his viewers’ sense of depth with busy patterns that continue from floor to ceiling. Rehberger’s sculptures are similarly entrancing with their bright colors and geometric forms. Though abstract at a first glance, many of his works cast shadows that form textual messages, adding another dimension of experience to the pieces.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Interdisciplinary artist Myriam Mechita creates sculptures, installations, and drawings where graphically violent content is presented as ornamental, sparkling eye candy, resulting in climactic visuals that stir the senses. Mechita’s sculpture work mixes ceramics and found objects and often features beheaded animals — especially deer — hanging upside down in methodical arrangements. Plastic beads — like those that hang from beaded curtains or Mardi Gras necklaces — appear to spill out of their necks. The animals’ bodies become almost like ritualistic sacrifices in Mechita’s work, which carefully balances darkly surrealist juxtapositions, occult imagery, and decorative kitsch.

by CaroPosted on

Last night, sculptor Daniel Arsham celebrated a return to his hometown of Miami with his installation, “Welcome to the Future” at Locust Projects. The project was successfully funded by Kickstarter and donations to create an original, site specific experience to Miami. Although an apocalyptic glimpse into our future, the piece is inspired by Arsham’s past- his survival of Hurricane Andrew in the 1990s.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

John Bisbee envisions his sculptures as drawings in which the 12-inch nails he hammers and welds act like lines in three dimensions. Since his serendipitous discovery of nails’ sculptural potential 30 years ago, Bisbee has been working with the unusual industrial material. His body of work includes organic shapes and architectural constructions alike. The nails act as uniform building blocks that allow him to create rhythmic patterns that echo through much of his work, whether it’s a snake-like floor sculpture, a bird’s nest of bent nails, or a precariously high pyramid.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Erika Sanada’s canine sculptures are both endearing and unnerving. There’s something sweet about her ceramic puppies (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31) despite their zombie eyes and pale, hairless skin. The dogs play, wrestle, and cuddle, but the ambiguous details in each sculpture make it possible to interpret their gestures as either tender or malicious, or perhaps a bit of both. Sanada began creating these creatures as a way of coping with anxiety. She says they represent dark elements of her mind she’s had to tame. The latest installment of her ongoing, autobiographical body of work will debut in her upcoming solo show, “Odd Things: Daydreaming,” which opens November 28 at Antler Gallery in Portland and runs through December 31.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

When he was a young artist in the 1970s, Chun Kwang Young left Korea and came to New York with a fantasy of the American dream. He was immediately culture-shocked by the materialistic society he witnessed and struggled to forge a unique voice as an artist. Struck by a bout of inspiration (which he describes at length in his artist statement), he began using newspapers as a sculptural medium. Young folds their pages into triangular prisms, aggregating them into crater-like shapes that evoke the surface of the moon. His style is inspired by Abstract Expressionism. Though his work recalls the free-flowing movement of Jackson Pollock’s paintings, his process is far more hands-on and meticulous than splashing paint.