by CaroPosted on

Seattle based artist Casey Weldon, first featured in HF Vol. 32, paints colorful and glowing works with nostalgic pop references and a touch of humor. In recent years, his paintings have become increasingly mystical, taking otherwise everyday places and animals and giving them a luminous, candy-colored twist. For his current exhibition at Roq la Rue gallery in Seattle, “Hastemaker”, Weldon builds upon his vibrantly colored, dreamlike world. It goes far beyond his “cute-gross” style, as he describes it.

by CaroPosted on

To the artists in Roq La Rue‘s upcoming exhibition “Lush Life: Reverie”, the lushness of late summer means bright pops of color, surreal fertile gardens, sensual heroines, and luxurious depictions of nature. Opening July 30th, the Seattle gallery is bringing back their “Lush Life” exhibition series with a newfound sense of fantasy. The exhibit features artists that have always explored natural themes to varying degree; Adrian Cox, Amanda Manitach, Ashley Eliza Williams, Casey Curran, Casey Weldon (HF Vol. 32), Christian Rex Van Minnen (HF Vol. 25), Eric Wert (HF Vol, 32), Erin Kendig, Esao Andrews (HF Vol. 8), Helen Bayly, Jeff Soto (HF Vol. 18), Jonathan Viner (HF Vol. 34), Kazuki Takamatsu (HF Vol. 33 cover artist), Lauren Marx, Laurie Lee Brom, Lowell Poisson, Marco Mazzoni (HF Vol. 20 cover artit), Peter Ferguson, Ryan Heshka, Sam Wolfe Connelly (HF Vol. 32), Scott Hove (HF Collected 3), and Tyna Ontko.

by CaroPosted on

Opening tomorrow, Roq la Rue’s new group exhibition “Plus One” gives their artists the opportunity to pair up with their latest inspirations. There are twelve artists in the exhibition, six selected artists and their +1’s: HF Vol. 27’s Stacey Rozich (+ Matt Craven), John Brophy (+ Deanna Adona), Peter Ferguson (+ Olivier Bonnard), HF Vol. 32 cover artist Travis Louie (+ Dorian Vallejo), Redd Walitzki (+ Meghan Howland), and Amanda Manitach (+ Adam Mars). Take a look at our preview after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Through a unique process of applying thin, translucent layers of monochromatic, acrylic paint to a panel over and over, Travis Louie (HF Vol. 32 cover artist) mimics the effect of 19th-century photography. Though filled with fantastical characters, his works have an effect of verisimilitude much like historical documents from the Victorian and Edwardian periods. For his latest solo show, “Archive of Lost Species,” which opens at Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle on May 7, Louie abandons the studio portrait format we’ve seen before. Instead, his latests works look like snapshots of strange monsters, sometimes observed in the wild and sometimes interacting with their human counterparts.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

The feelings of horror and rapture collide at high speeds when viewing Lauren Marx’s work. The St. Louis-based artist creates beautiful vignettes that speak to the cycle of life. Rather than a cleaned-up, Disneyfied verson of nature, her paintings give us raw depictions of birth and death. Influenced my scientific illustrations and the Baroque period alike, Marx’s maximalist mixed-media works present these cyclical phenomena in visually appealing ways, often fusing the chaotic elements of nature into stylized compositions with an emphasis on design. Marx’s solo show, “American Wilderness,” opens at Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle on May 7.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


April is a big month for Seattle’s Roq La Rue Gallery, with three shows all opening tonight. In their main room, Peter Ferguson presents a new collection of rust-hued paintings set sometime in the 19th century for his solo show, “Prime Meridian.” In this series, anachronistic villagers and city dwellers encounter increasingly more surreal characters than previously seen in his past work. Monsters invade old-fashioned pubs, schools, and manors — perhaps pointing to the monstrosities of the colonial period, the real-world context his work can’t escape.