by Andy SmithPosted on


Stephanie Buer has been exploring the decay and evolution of cityscapes since studying at College for Creative Studies in Detroit in the mid-2000s, where she began to pursue a career in painting and drawing. In her charcoal works, these urban scenes garner a sense of desolation, stripped of even fading hues or sunlight. Buer was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.

by CaroPosted on

David Rice fuses the natural and the man-made in his paintings, representing the possibility of a peaceful balance between the two. Featured here on our blog, and in our current issue of Hi-Fructose Vol. 39, his wildlife-filled works address themes like cohabitation, where people and animals are combined to create hybrid beings, often wrapped in colorful textiles. The Portland based painter is about to debut a new series, entitled “High Alpine”, his largest body of work to date.

by CaroPosted on

Maria Kreyn is a Russian born, New York based artist often described as a realist, and while she has a command of painting the human figure, her exquisitely rendered oil paintings are more concerned with what we can’t see. To borrow a quote from Aristotle, one of her favorite philosophers, “The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” Kreyn carries this notion with her as she works, seeking to depict people in a realistic light, while capturing their essence and soul. “I make work that looks to infinity- that’s spiritually driven,” she says.

by CaroPosted on

“I believe that artists should speak about the most desperate and desirable issues for humanity,” says Korean painter Kwon Kyung-Yup. Though known for her realistic portraits of melancholy subjects, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, Kwon describes herself as a happy person whose paintings are about recalling memories. Her works find an emotional balance between her artistic inspirations, citing the beauty in Klimt’s paintings which she pairs with tragedy, as found in the works of Caravaggio.

by CaroPosted on

After getting his start by mural painting in and around Brisbane, artist Fintan Magee has since grown on an international scale, and his figurative murals and fine art can now be found around the world. Featured here on our blog, his art draws influences from his childhood, where he links his personal experiences and nostalgia to broader social issues like climate change or class struggle. “In some works, I feel like I am telling stories that I don’t fully understand, there is definitely an element of chaos or the subliminal in my work as well,” Magee says.

by CaroPosted on

To Brooklyn, New York based artist Dan Witz, the mosh pit is a place of savage beauty. Featured here on our blog, the longtime street artist, who was in his own punk band, combines his passion for art and the energy of the hardcore music scene in his “Mosh Pit” series. He slows down the chaos of the nightclub from the musician’s perspective into paintings that are strangely primal, focused on both the private and collective experience.