by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul White focuses on a single medium in creating his hyper-detailed works: colored pencil on paper. In particular, the artist is focused on the concepts of decay and objects becoming obsolete. In terms of source material, much of his work is derived from photographs taken of desertscapes and other scenes across the West Coast.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chilean artist Alonsa Guevara’s upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Zorina Gallery in New York City, titled Ceremonies, honors life’s varying stages with renderings of “imaginary rites.” Humans, harvests, and lands are among those celebrated in the exhibition, as a collection of oil paintings on canvas. The show runs Sept. 1 through Oct. 1.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armando Veve, a Philadelphia-based artist, creates drawings of surreal scenes and constructions, though each element is rendered in realism. His eye for detail works on granular level, with Veve’s slow and meticulous process producing countless dots and lines for one cohesive image. The style recalls both pointillism and vintage illustrations in reference books. And its striking results have garnered commissions from high-profile publications. Veve was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Based in Charleston, South Carolina, painter Karen Ann Myers uses the bedroom as the backdrop to each of her works, both idealizing the space and offering vulnerability and strength with each subject. Specifically, the bed used as reference in each piece belongs to Myers, while the rooms are retrofitted with new styles, adored objects, and context. The result is a singular personality, with her own elegance and character.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Stephanie Buer has been exploring the decay and evolution of cityscapes since studying at College for Creative Studies in Detroit in the mid-2000s, where she began to pursue a career in painting and drawing. In her charcoal works, these urban scenes garner a sense of desolation, stripped of even fading hues or sunlight. Buer was last featured on Hi-Fructose here.

by CaroPosted on

David Rice fuses the natural and the man-made in his paintings, representing the possibility of a peaceful balance between the two. Featured here on our blog, and in our current issue of Hi-Fructose Vol. 39, his wildlife-filled works address themes like cohabitation, where people and animals are combined to create hybrid beings, often wrapped in colorful textiles. The Portland based painter is about to debut a new series, entitled “High Alpine”, his largest body of work to date.