by CaroPosted on

José Luis Torres is an Argentinean artist currently living in Quebec who builds largescale works out of salvaged objects. He’s set up public art installations and sculptures all over the world, using everything from antique doors, window panes, to assemblages of brightly colored plastic as his materials. Often, his works have an overflowing effect as they burst from existing environments and architectural structures. His latest work entitled “Overflows” is a part of the 2015 Passages Insolites (Unusual Passages) event in Quebec City’s Old Port.

by CaroPosted on

Visitors to Versailles Palace this summer will be greeted by a new exhibition of sculptures by the British-Indian artist Anish Kapoor. From June to October, six of his works are on view in the Jeu de Paume room in Versailles and the gardens, where they are already sparking debate. This is because one of his creations is a 197 foot long tunnel of steel symbolizing “the vagina of the queen who takes power”. Some say the piece is a disfigurement to history, however it has nothing to do with Marie Antoinette. In fact, it was first realized in 2011 for the Fabbrica del Vapore in Milan. Kapoor’s bravado should come as no surprise. Known for his bold and large scale works, he is perhaps most recognized for his “Cloud Gate” in Chicago’s Millennium Park and “Sky Mirror,” exhibited at the Rockefeller Center in New York. Reinterpreted here, they are ambitious manipulations of form using reflective surfaces to being evocative of flesh and blood.

by CaroPosted on

For five years in a row, the open air exhibition “Sculpture in the City” has brought some of the best contemporary artists to the public in London. Opening this week on July 9th, this year’s installment will feature new works by Ekkehard Altenburger, Bruce Beasley, Adam Chodzko, Ceal Floyer, Laura Ford, Damien Hirst, Shan Hur, Folkert de Jong, Sigalit Landau, Kris Martin, Keita Miyazaki, Tomoaki Suzuki, Xavier Veilhan, and Ai Weiwei. The exhibit merges the new with the old as their works are set against the city’s most historic landmarks. Take a look at more photos of Sculpture in the City 2015 as it comes together, after the jump.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

After painting mostly around his homeland and some cities in Europe, Barcelona-based artist Pejac (covered here) recently took off on a tour around the Far East. During his trip, he stopped in Hong Kong, Seoul and Tokyo, leaving his mark in every city. From introducing new images and concepts to recreating some familiar ones, Pejac demonstrates his ability to work in different environments or mediums. Covering various subjects, mostly referring to the places he’s visiting, the new works Pejac has created range from effective window-drawings to sculptural pieces.

by CaroPosted on

Czech sculptor David Cerný has a reputation for being a “bad boy” artist. Although he rejects labels, he is most certainly a political artist, one whose works visually lash out against his government’s hypocrisies. One of the first pieces to put him on the international map was a pink Soviet tank that served as a war memorial in Prague, followed by such sculptures as the Czech patron St. Wenceslas riding an inverted horse, and giant stainless steel babies crawling up the city’s TV tower, to name a few. They are witty and bizarre but come from an intellectual place, even though the artist refuses to take himself too seriously. While he recognizes that his hometown in Prague is easily shocked, he does not create art for the sole purpose of shocking his audience.

by CaroPosted on

The shape of a church is indefinitely sketched into the landscape in the latest project by architecture duo, Gijs Van Vaerenbergh. Comprised of Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh, their series of see-through churches, “Reading Between the Lines,” are not intended to be functional as shelter. They are more like sculptures that borrow design inspiration from local churches’ architecture in the area. See more after the jump!