by Andy SmithPosted on

Kathleen Neeley’s linocut prints are infused with varying cultures across time, yet feel wholly contemporary in reflection. The artist looks at our relationship to the Earth, femininity, and other personal subjects while maintaining the elements and motifs of myths.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Raj Bunnag‘s massive linocut prints teem with monsters, overwhelming details, and contemporary reflections. The Durham, N.C.-based artist, in particular, has explored drug culture in these scenes, using mythical and mystical creatures at war to reflect on our relationship to drug culture from all angles, including over-criminalization.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a set of encaustics and prints, artist Ethan Lauesen explores the perceptions of gender and LGBTQIA+ identity in regions like Interior Alaska. The work both documents and serves as a personal expression of those themes, also enveloping race and sexuality in this sprawling visual statement. Lauesen often shares looks into the process behind these works on their Instagram account.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Simon Lice‘s wood-cut relief collages are stirring looks inside the human body. In a recent show at Outre Gallery, titled “Headaches Coughing Fits,” the artist offered a set of these works, combining talents in drawing, printmaking, and curation of hues. The Melbourne-based artist, a jeweler by trade, is also influenced by tattoo culture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Trevor Knapp’s linocut prints use texture and value to create absorbing scenes. The process, in which artists cut pieces away from a sheet of linoleum and use the design to create ink prints, takes on a ghostly quality at the hands of Knapp. Shadows and mystery tend to play major roles in series like “Memories of a Metropolis.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Luke O’Sullivan, a printmaker and sculptor based in Philadelphia, combines media and perspectives to detail fictional environments. In “Rise and Shine,” a new show at Paradigm Gallery, O’Sullivan offers a collection of new work that he says are about exploration and adventure. “I make sculptures that illustrate invented and undiscovered worlds,” the artist tells us.