by Andy SmithPosted on

With Crystal Morey‘s newest handmade porcelain sculptures, the artist takes influence from 18th century European art history. “Lush Anthesis,” a body of work in a new show at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, contains hybrid creations made from humans, flora, and fauna. Morey was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kate MacDowell‘s handsculpted, porcelain creatures and plantlife look at both the vulnerability and power of the natural world. The artist says she choses “porcelain for its luminous and ghostly qualities as well as its strength and ability to show fine texture.” MacDowell is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 boxset.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sergei Isupov’s figurative porcelain and stoneware sculptures use the material in differing ways. The artist sometimes uses the surface to create 2D renderings, and elsewhere, the characters are three-dimensional. More recently, some of the works do both on the same piece.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Israeli artist Zemer Peled uses slivers of porcelain to emulate shapes and forms of the natural world, from feathers to leaves and petals. The result is something otherworldly, blending hues and patterns for something both familiar and strange. The delicate and organic constructions defy their actual sharp, hardened nature. These works come in differing sizes, from the size of common houseplants to towering over viewers, all made from thousands of pieces of porcelain.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Sculptor and ceramics artist Johnson Tsang, based in Hong Kong, creates surreal, spellbinding faces in porcelain. Dramatic and often humorous, these characters are warped in varying emotions, whether it’s a distorted, yet intimate kiss, total relaxation while being massaged, or contorted far behind comfort. Two series from this year, “Lucid Dream” and “Stillness,” show just how wide-ranging the artist’s imagination can be, all using the human face as its foundation.
Tsang’s work last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by CaroPosted on

London based sculptor Rachel Kneebone is well known for her complex porcelain pieces that contain writhing groupings of human figures. Her work has been described as depicting an “erotic state of flux” and “celebrating forms of transgression, beauty and seduction,” influenced by ancient Greek and Roman myths and also the modern human experience- you can find aspects of change, death, growth, renewal, and lust dissolved together in her individual pieces.