by Andy SmithPosted on

Notice a mushroom that looks a little different than the rest? Hi-Fructose Magazine co-founder Attaboy has started to “plant” 100 hand-painted mushroom works across the U.S. This scavenger hunt heads to Los Angeles (and in particular, Glendale, Burbank, and Santa Monica) next, and you can follow his Instagram account to see what’s out there.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Johnny Rodriguez, a Los Angeles-based artist who creates under the moniker KMNDZ, moves between commercial and personal work in his textured, pop style. The artist has created a mural at the new House of Blues Anaheim, displaying his aesthetic. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Over the past year, pop surrealist Mark Ryden has tackled an unlikely new medium: ballet. Ryden designed the sets and costumes for the new American Ballet Theatre production “Whipped Cream.” The so-called “two-act confection” is based off the Richard Strauss-penned libretto “Schlagobers,” which was first performed in 1924 by the Vienna State Opera.The show kicks off on March 15 at Segerstrom Center for the Arts in Costa Mesa.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Jacobsmeyer’s oil paintings on aluminum recall nostalgic and imaginative experience, using wooden backdrops and technology-inspired shapes. These works at once feel aged and modern, and while humor runs throughout his recent works, several ring of sincerity and vulnerability. And a few others have skeleton warriors. Jacobsmeyer has cited Gene Roddenberry, Nietzsche, David Lynch, and Mary Shelley as influences.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Yasam Sasmazer, a Turkish artist who works in Berlin, crafts wooden sculptures the deal with psychological hardship and narratives. Series like “Metanoia” take influence from the work of psychiatrist Carl Jung, exploring the journey between mental breakdowns and the evolution that follows. Her use of three-dimensional figures and shadows, both simulated and real, offer an absorbing take on the duality of living.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tina Yu, a Chinese-raised, New York-based artist and designer, creates hand sculptures, which are used as pendants. These polymer clay pieces are painted with acrylics, and they move between delicate reflections of nature’s flora and fauna and something much bleaker.