by CaroPosted on

New York based artist Jim McKenzie, who is also an accomplished animation director, once said that his dream is to rebuild Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory. His upcoming debut solo show entitled “Lost Magic” comes pretty close. Opening on June 4th at Copro Gallery in Los Angeles, McKenzie’s exhibit invites viewers to enter into his surreal imagination: new paintings and hand-painted resin sculptures of fun and playful characters that recall our favorite childhood fairy tales with a twist.

by Margot BuermannPosted on

In her signature style that blends magic realism with storybook illustration, American painter Lori Nelson explores the mysterious, frightening, and undeniably magical world of teens in “Cryptotweens Are Like”. Her new series of oil-on-panel paintings depicts monstrous tweens and teens that, on the surface, bear little resemblance to ordinary youths. Nelson’s “cryptotweens” trek through dark forests alongside animal companions, are covered in fur and scales, and seem to harness their powers through their smart phones (okay, maybe that last one sounds like your average teen).

by CaroPosted on

Earlier today, we brought you photos from Saturday night’s opening of Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose, a bi-coastal collaboration between the magazine and Virginia MOCA. Now, we’d like to give you a closer look at the art and see what it’s like to walk through the halls of this unprecedented group of 51 new contemporary artists from all genres and corners of the world.

by CaroPosted on

Hi-Fructose Vol. 14 cover artist Greg “Craola” Simkins, featured here on our blog, pulls ideas from his childhood- his favorite cartoons, old comics, and vintage packaging- and ties it all together to create art that gives a feeling of being a kid again. The Los Angeles based artist has said that his journey to being an artist began with drawing on the wall after everyone would go to sleep, and his dreams of things that go bump in the night continue to inform his surrealistic works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Longtime followers of Japanese artist Kazuki Takamatsu may already know his process: painstaking gouache layers that recreate scenes first imagined on 3-D computer software. Yet, in his latest set of striking paintings at the Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, the otherworldy nature of Takamatsu’s work is what again draws viewers into this haunted world of hologram-like characters. The solo show “Decoration Armament” opens this Saturday, and it features some of the HF Vol. 33 cover artist’s most ambitious and engrossing work yet.

by CaroPosted on

One of the leading ladies of Pop Surrealism, California based artist Marion Peck populates her dreamlike paintings with strange, cute creatures. As her magical landscapes unfold, an uneasy melancholy seems to fill the air. First featured on our blog and in print, Peck’s work mines the depths of art history, popular culture with references ranging from Pieter Bruegel to Holly Hobbie.