by CaroPosted on

First covered on our blog, Dex Fernandez injects a dizzying and chaotic energy into his eclectic collage portraits. He will debut them in New York tomorrow at Owen James Gallery in a colorful installation that also includes animation. Many of the pieces in the show were created over the past few months, during an artist residency in the United States by the Asian Arts Council. To enhance the digital photographs that Fernandez has used as his canvas, he incorporates details such as neon-colored embroidery and paints. These create a frenzied, but seamless pattern strung throughout each piece, which continues onto the gallery wall with cut-paper shapes.

by CaroPosted on

Yoshimitsu Umekawa’s photographs look like pictures of a pop-colored apocalypse. The forms in his images appear vibrant and swirling at first, but then evoke an underlying darkness. In the studio, Umekawa’s process is similar to another photographer, Kim Keever, creating images inside of a fish tank and then coloring them digitally. His ‘clouds’ come in a variety of colors and iterations, and he has photographed 100 of them so far. He calls them “Incarnations”- visible parts of his experience as a young person living in Tokyo, with a nod to Japan’s past which is no stranger to catastrophe.

by CaroPosted on

If you’re looking for some DIY Halloween decoration ideas, look no further. London based illustrator Kerry Hughes’s latest series features intricately hand-tied balloons made into the shapes of human organs. “It’s very inspiring when a person can take an unexpected or everyday material and completely rethink it,” Hughes says. The artist is mostly known for her colorful and playful work using paper and wood, but her series “Pneumatic Anatomy” in collaboration with friend and photographer Aaron Tilley takes it to a conceptual level.

by CaroPosted on

Manila, Phillipines based artist Dex Fernandez creates works that range from street art murals, animation, painting and drawing to photography. Using a variety of media, his ongoing series of eclectic collage portraits combines almost all of his interests. Fernandez’s inspirations are equally diverse. His series juxtaposes good and evil, beauty and ugliness by mixing pop art, religious iconography, and vintage images from posters and magazines that he finds in thrift shops.

by CaroPosted on

For Canada’s foremost ‘pop artist’ Gary Taxali (first featured in HF Vol. 4), the artist’s first major retrospective exhibition in Ontario was a long time coming. Currently on view at Design on Riverside, “Here and Now: The Art of Gary Taxali” features hundreds of Taxali’s personal and professional works over the years in a salon-style presentation of paintings, toys and objects, and assemblages of his most popular prints. The artist is recognized worldwide for his tinted illustrations of cartoon characters and vintage-inspired typography, which have appeared in the likes of New York Times, GQ, and Rolling Stone.

by CaroPosted on

Ohio based artist Alfred Steiner has an admittedly bizarre predilection for anatomical and fragmented parts since his childhood. His watercolor paintings of pop culture icons, logos, and cartoon characters use unseemly pieces to build an image. His work could be described as modern day Pop-Mannerism, a combination of Pop Art and Mannerist art, and brings to mind that of Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo, who painted imaginative faces made of fruits and other objects. However, Steiner credits more surprising and eclectic inspirations, such as the fantastic imagery of Netherlandish painter Hieronymus Bosch and fictional characters like Homer Simpson.