by Andy SmithPosted on

The bold, dynamic oil paintings of French artist Cedrix Crespel use atypical perspective, a graphical approach, and abstractions. The subjects and backdrops recall the femme fatale of comic books and street art. In a statement, the artist offers insight into the ever-present female form in his works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ron English‘s oil paintings have long entertained, bewildered, and challenged viewers in each’s absorbing strangeness. In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery, titled “TOYBOX: America in the Visuals,” the artist offers his latest body of work. The pop art legend’s show starts Dec. 2 and runs through Dec. 30. The new collection deploys “the artist’s long established visual vocabulary into multi-layered narratives of ambition and imagination.” English was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


We’ve noticed that graphic designer/artist Kii Arens likes fruit. Whether it’s fruit made to look like other food or something entirely inedible like a briefcase, Arens both highlights the inherent beauty of the food group and bends it to his will. Above and below, you can see the several ways the artist works fruit into his work, whether it’s promotional posters or personal prints.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

Stephen Friedman gallery in London is currently showing their fourth solo exhibition with acclaimed Japanese artist, Yoshitomo Nara, covered here. Following his recent solo exhibitions at Yokohama Museum of Art, Japan, Asia Society Museum, New York, Asia Society Hong Kong Center and Reykjavik Art Museum, Iceland, “New Works” is the simple title of the current exhibition by one of the most important living contemporary Japanese artists.

by CaroPosted on

“I never imagined some of my pictures would be in Moscow,” says 82 year old artist Peter Saul. The San Francisco based painter’s early use of pop-culture cartoon references in the late 1950s and early 1960s has earned him the title of a Pop Art founding father, and to date, he has realized over 800 paintings throughout his career. A colorful selection of them made their debut on Friday at Gary Tatintsian Gallery in Moscow, Russia in Saul’s new exhibit, “You better call Saul!”

by CaroPosted on

It is in Keiichi Tanaami’s personality to take even the darkest of his life’s experiences and turn them into positive expressions. The Psychedelic Japanese artist’s sensational paintings of crazy characters engaged in the chaos of war has made him a leading art figure not just in Japan, but all over the world. We recently featured Tanaami’s intensely visual work in Hi-Fructose Vol. 38, where he shared with us the origins of his art, and the deep effect that his wartime experiences has had on his psyche. In this rare interview, Tanaami tells us more about his dark past and the myriad of international influences on his work to date.