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Romain Laurent‘s surreal photography mixes humor and disconcerting scenes, whether its his strange “Inner Dialogue” series or his subtly animated “One Loop Portraits.” The artist has both personal and commercial practices. Laurent hails from France but is currently based in New York City.

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Brooke DiDonato’s photographs put a strange touch on ordinary Western backdrops. The narratives, though vague, evoke intimacy in how it confronts its disappearing or despondent characters. In series like “Recess,” “In Bloom,” “Roses” and “A House is Not a Home,” the artist is able to either inject fleeting beauty into undesirable places or extract surrealism out of the unassuming.

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Photographer Davide Luciano‘s “Sheep Nation” series abandons the use of digital tricks and implements prosthetic make-up, meticulous lighting, and several models and crew members to create surreal scenes. Each of the mask applications took up to three hours to apply, and photos from the series move between stirring portraits and scenes from the everyday.

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Artist Mike Campau combines photography and digital techniques for his “Antisocial” series, a project that takes a pointed look at digital platforms we use to communicate. For much of the work, there’s a cynical beauty in the details, with letter boards reflecting our frivolous behavior and dependency on social media. In a statement, he offers some insight into the series:

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In the La Merced neighborhood in San Cristóbal de las Casas in Chiapas, Mexico, costumed characters hit the streets to welcome the feast day of Our Lady of La Merced and reflect the sins of the wearer. In Diego Moreno’s photo series “Guardians of Memory,” he navigates this tradition in his old neighborhood and explores converging cultures by placing these monsters in domestic situations.

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Alma Haser is known for adding surreal, sculptural twists to her portraits. One of her new series sees the photographer creating puzzles out of images of identical twins, then swapping every other the piece of the separate portraits for absorbing results. Haser didn’t know where facial features would end up in this process, offering a surprise to both the artist and the viewer. Haser was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.