by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel Ramirez’s “A Series of Shots” captures surreal, unsettling characters and situations in his photography-based illustrations. These vibrant captures mix the humorous and the grim, toying with vintage and children’s story iconography with dreamlike twists. The open-ended series aims to “shoot any individual, object of essence, animals, and any disguised human.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stacey Page

A new group show titled “Process” features artists who use photography as “as a means to an end rather than an end in itself.” This includes usage, manipulation, and altering of photographs in media like drawing, digital art, collage, painting, and more. The Helikon Gallery & Studios show features artists like Jinsil Lee, Jessica Wohl, Corianne Wells, Curt Bean, Nicki Crock, Peter Yumi, Anitra Isler, and several others. The show runs March 18 through April 22.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nicolas Bruno’s photographs and drawings mix surrealism and unsettling, solitary drama. In his first solo show with Haven Gallery in Northport, New York, the artist offers 17 new works that the gallery says are “transmuted from Bruno’s dreams as a means of coping and controlling his sleep paralysis affliction.” The show kicks off on February 25 and runs through April 2.

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Carlos Bracho, a photographer from Panama, creates surreal scenes that are often a dramatic blend of nature, humanity, and abstraction. Also a biotechnologist, the artist crafts images that “explore my life experiences in images that combine frustration, loneliness and human behavior in a mixture that (also) combines nature and decay environment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Diane Meyer emulates pixels and digital imaging with cross-stitched embroidery, sewn into her photos. Whether it’s a series of travel captures or her own, personal family snaps, Meyer explores both intersecting eras of photography and the concept of memory itself. The result is something that both distorts and celebrates the longevity of these experiences.

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Lucas Zimmermann, a self-taught photographer, explores light and color with his “Traffic Lights” series. The project exists in two separate parts, with “Traffic Lights 2.0” debuting just months ago. In these haunting shots, the photographer offers no human interactivity with the lights, which of course, are intended solely to move individuals from point A to B. Zimmermann photographed these in the place in which he lives and works, in Weimar, Germany.