by Andy SmithPosted on

Jason DeMarte, an artist/photographer based in Michigan, combines images of artificial flora and fauna and processed food (and other commercial products) to create a new depiction of the natural world in the series “Confected.” Even in the tranquility of each image, the scenes reflect the dissonance inherent in the contemporary experience. The artist says he uses “completely unnatural elements to speak metaphorically and symbolically of our mental separation from what is ‘real,’ and compare and contrast this with the consumer world we surround ourselves with as a consequence.” Follow the artist on Instagram here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Even if the final representation of Georges Rousse’s work is a single-perspective photograph, the French artist is a man of several disciplines. He also considers himself a sculptor, painter, and architect, having transformed nondescript, soon-to-be-demolished spaces into transcendental pieces for decades. A Starbucks at The Cosmopolitan hotel in Las Vegas doesn’t share the same fate as those abandoned buildings, yet even in this bustling hub, Rousse creates a singular moment viewable in just one spot.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The name “Albarrán Cabrera” is a moniker for the Spanish duo Anna Cabrera and Angel Albarran. The photographers have produced work together for the past two decades, showcasing across the world and tackling new challenges and techniques together under one name. And for each new theme, the duo finds away to show each’s singular vision within a broader idea.

by CaroPosted on

When asked about his main interest in photography, Ole Marius Joergensen once said that rather than capturing a version of reality, he loves to create illusions. The Oslo based photographer has a background in film that shows in his cinematic and atmospheric images, described as appearing almost unreal, or as Joergensen puts it, “a Norwegian strain of surrealism”. This is especially true of his new series “Behind the Curtains,” a surreal set of images shown through the eyes of his inquiring subjects, and catching them in moments of forbidden fascination.

by CaroPosted on

Olaf Breuning is a Swiss-born, New-York based artist known for his experimental multimedia works, spanning photographs, videos, drawings and installations, sometimes mixed together, that regularly make use of pop-culture imagery. Often described as “outlandish”, his art also addresses ideas about consumerism, stereotypes, gender clichés, and analyzes the relationship between art and kitsch. Among these is his bizarre photo series “The Art Freaks”, which originally debuted in 2011, and is being revisited in the artist’s 15-year retrospective, “The Madness That We Call Reality”.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the 2005 series “Teenage Stories,” Julia Fullerton-Batten expressed the transition from girlhood to womanhood with surrealist photographs of towering adolescents. These aren’t Photoshopped images, as Fullerton-Batten noted in the artist statement: “I shot the images on location in model villages so that the girls appear to have outgrown the world they live in, as in their day-dream existence.”