by Andy SmithPosted on

In Niko Photographisme‘s “The Robot Next Door” series, the artist depicts a world in which robotic creatures are among us. Blending analog materials with a bit of digital manipulation to create a surreal final product, the artist is able to create an intimate view of a sci-fi scenario. Depicting the figures taking part in everyday activities, the pieces carry a surprising vulnerability to match the futuristic concept.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Christy Lee Rogers stages her work underwater, alluding to the vibrancy and elaborate elegance of the Baroque period. Her “Hybrids” series, in particular, blends the beauty of submerged human form, plantlife, and textiles. The artist has said that her work questions and finds “understanding in the craziness, tragedy, vulnerability, beauty and power of mankind.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Pelle Cass’s composite photographs use time-lapse techniques to create chaotic sporting events. The artist has said that part of the fun in creating each work is being able to subvert the typical athletic affair and put the crowds in the fields, not in the stands. The artist doesn’t alter any of the settings in the work; he only takes out and adds in figures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the series “Ça va aller,” photographer Joana Choumali adds embroidery to images captured of her African hometown, Abidjan, in the days after the March 2016 Grand-Bassam terrorist attack that took 19 lives and injured 33. She began embroidering as a way to cope, with the series evolving from this approach. The artist observed a melancholic population following the event.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Romain Laurent‘s surreal photography mixes humor and disconcerting scenes, whether its his strange “Inner Dialogue” series or his subtly animated “One Loop Portraits.” The artist has both personal and commercial practices. Laurent hails from France but is currently based in New York City.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brooke DiDonato’s photographs put a strange touch on ordinary Western backdrops. The narratives, though vague, evoke intimacy in how it confronts its disappearing or despondent characters. In series like “Recess,” “In Bloom,” “Roses” and “A House is Not a Home,” the artist is able to either inject fleeting beauty into undesirable places or extract surrealism out of the unassuming.