by CaroPosted on

Klaus Enrique is a New York based photographer whose work parallels Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo and has come to adopt the term “Arcimboldist” for his expression. His creepy, amusing, nevertheless stunning portraits capture subjects made from real objects, fruits, and vegetables that realize Arcimboldo’s paintings in real life. At first glance, it might appear as though Enrique’s work is created digitally, but they are actually photographs of sculptures made out of real organic elements, also making Enrique a sculptor.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Charles Gatewood, the prolific San Francisco based visionary and photographer who was called “the family photographer of America’s erotic underground” died early this Thursday morning, April 28th. He had been in the ICU at SF General Hospital after suffering complications from a three-story fall that tragically ended his life at age 74.

by CaroPosted on

Photography as a medium has a dual character. Since its introduction, artists have used it to produce both art as well as document the world around them. For Chicago artist Newbold Bohemia, photography is a little bit of both: his photo series have documented real life issues, presented in staged, then manipulated images from his imagination. In his playful yet devious new series, “In an Ideal World,” Bohemia visualizes the story of a rebellious 1950s woman in the domestic world.

by CaroPosted on

The haunting smoke photographs of French photographer Gilles Soudry transport us into his black and fluffy universe, where the streams of smoke take on strangely human and animal-like formations. First featured here on our blog last year, Soudry has since completed the third installment of his “Volutes” series, an ongoing study of smoke’s mystifying effects as it is captured in a single moment in time.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Intricate portraits created by Jason Chen, a photographer based in Philadelphia, come from multiple images of the same subject. But as the artist weaves them together, in a process he says explores “time, movement, process, and mutation,” a new representation of the individual emerges (and the backdrop that encloses them). And somehow, their humanity remains intact.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Aida Muluneh has lived all over the world, but it was in returning to Ethiopia that she found inspiration for her latest body of work. Muluneh’s first solo exhibition for David Kruts Projects in New York City was titled “The World is 9,” and it featured new images from the artist. The title comes from something the artist’s grandmother used to say: “The world is 9. It is never complete and never perfect.”