by Andy SmithPosted on

Alma Haser is known for adding surreal, sculptural twists to her portraits. One of her new series sees the photographer creating puzzles out of images of identical twins, then swapping every other the piece of the separate portraits for absorbing results. Haser didn’t know where facial features would end up in this process, offering a surprise to both the artist and the viewer. Haser was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 31.

by Andy SmithPosted on

San Francisco-raised artist Kat Toronto blends performance art and photography under the working name of Miss Meatface, using both vintage Polaroid and contemporary methods. The artist says part of her work stems in having been diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2010 and subsequently having to receive a full hysterectomy. Toronto now uses her moniker “as an artistic and spiritual catalyst to delve into a complex set of questions about where she fits into society as a woman.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Azuma Makoto’s known for his ambitious flower art, manipulating nature into something new, yet still maintaining its beauty. With the “In Bloom” project, he’s taken his sensibilities to space. Makoto’s been sending bouquets to space with specialized balloon vehicles and cameras. The result is something that combines the inherent exquisiteness of the Earth and its surrounding bodies.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Karen Jerzyk creates surreal works that use often overlooked spaces and themes of both horror and the fantastic. Despite what seems like a complex narrative in each piece, the artist insists that each photo is open to interpretation. She simply aims to invoke “thought and emotion.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stefan Gesell, a German photographer, creates portraits that appear to be torn from the pages of sci-fi and horror novels. Using dynamic lighting and effects, the rawness and aggression of Gesell’s work makes it stand out among peers attempting to capture dystopian worlds within the same form.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Italian artist Giuseppe Palmisano creates photographs that somehow treat the body as object while conveying human ideas. Wedged between furniture and and bent and entwined with others, his female subjects and their apparel are paired with subtle hues and rooms. The artist has a theatrical background, and he creates a mystery in both the meaning and identity of his subjects.