by CaroPosted on

Budapest, Hungary based photographer Flora Borsi specializes in digital photography and photo manipulations, where she seeks to visualize the physically impossible. We first featured her work on our Tumblr blog, a surreal series that imagined what the “real life models” of abstract artists Pablo Picasso, Amedeo Modigliani, Rudolf Hausner, and Kazimir Malevich might have looked liked. Her new series, titled “Animeyed (self portraits)” digitally overlaps images of the artist’s own face with animals into a single “animal eye”.

by CaroPosted on

The selfie is the self-portrait of the digital age that is changing the way we see and think about ourselves and eachother. But what happens when we remove our faces from our photos? How would we look without our heads? Ibiza, Spain based designer Giuseppe Pepe presents us with this same question in his series of photo manipulations titled “Loosing My Mind”. He describes it as a project of “anti-beauty,” going against our intrinsic desire to present our most beautiful self to the world.

by CaroPosted on

Vilnius, Lithuania based photographer Ceslovas Cesnakevicius says that he first got into taking pictures for the purpose of creating his surrealistic photo-manipulations. A browse through his Facebook page will transport you into a dreamy other-world where magic is real; old-timey explorers ride hot air balloons made of puffy white clouds, while men in top hats enjoy a sunny afternoon snooze in paper sail boats. His latest series titled “The Zoo” imagines what it would be like if we shared our every day world with wild animals in whimsical black and white images.

by CaroPosted on

Nothing beat a cardboard box growing up because it wasn’t just made of cardboard. Cardboard could instantly become your ticket to a rocket on the moon or your dream fortress where you ruled the world. Using this simple material and a lot of imagination, artist duo Zoey Taylor and David Connelly have built the world they wish to live in. They call it “The House of Cardboard”, better known as “Dosshaus”. The two (or as they say, “Les Deux”) first met in 2010 and it was a match made in heaven that works together as a team, cutting and gluing together the cardboard pieces into life size installations, which feature the creative couple living in a monochromatic black and white house.

by CaroPosted on

The little colored bricks that we grew up playing with are more than toys to Berlin based photographer Laird Kay, who uses lego to represent entire cities. His playful photo series titled “Lego City” features miniature skylines and cityscapes inspired by real cities like Dubai, Hong Kong, New York, Toronoto and Vancouver, built to a highly stylized scale from thousands of legos. Kay has gotten to know global cities very well over the past couple of years. As a busy, constantly traveling photographer, he describes himself an architecture geek living in a “plane world”, who disagrees about the way we treat old buildings and then toss them out with the garbage when we’ve finished with them- similar to the way a child destructs his lego buildings to start anew.

by CaroPosted on

Lala Abaddon combines traditional practices of weaving, photography, and painting into her brilliantly colored woven prints. When we first featured her work, Abaddon took us behind the scenes into her New York studio, where she works quietly alongside her parakeet Poquito, and showed us how she uses a stationary rail cutter to make the compositions of her largescale weaves out of her own photographs, images inspired by complex backstories. Take a look at her newer works after the jump!