by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Karen Jerzyk creates surreal works that use often overlooked spaces and themes of both horror and the fantastic. Despite what seems like a complex narrative in each piece, the artist insists that each photo is open to interpretation. She simply aims to invoke “thought and emotion.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stefan Gesell, a German photographer, creates portraits that appear to be torn from the pages of sci-fi and horror novels. Using dynamic lighting and effects, the rawness and aggression of Gesell’s work makes it stand out among peers attempting to capture dystopian worlds within the same form.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Italian artist Giuseppe Palmisano creates photographs that somehow treat the body as object while conveying human ideas. Wedged between furniture and and bent and entwined with others, his female subjects and their apparel are paired with subtle hues and rooms. The artist has a theatrical background, and he creates a mystery in both the meaning and identity of his subjects.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cayetano Ferrández, a Spanish artist/photographer, uses his “Gray Man” action figures and micro-narratives to explore varying, often bleak aspects of humanity. His work, a combination of photography, sculpture, and other mixed-media, has integrated toys since the early 2000s, with the “Gray Man” series being an ongoing project.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel Rueda and Anna Devís, a duo based in Valencia, Spain, travel the world, crafting photographs that use both each other and architecture as characters. Toying with perspective and geometry, each photo the pair publish on their respective Instagram accounts is packed with humor and accompanying text.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Antony Crossfield, an artist based in London, manipulates his photographs to create new ways of looking at our natural forms. Series like “Second Skin” take the outer shell of the human body and pushes it outside of the boundaries of superficiality. It’s in these exercises that Crossfield aims to “to present the body not as a protective envelope that defines and unifies our limits, but as an organ of physical and psychical interchange between bodies.”