by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

People across the world have come forward with claims that they’ve found the fabled Yeti or Big Foot. Though the elusive creature remains in the wild, photographer Mako Miyamoto seems to have come close to capturing it with his latest solo show, “Speculative Hunting.” In the humorous body of work, which debuts at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco on April 25, models clad in Wookiee masks from Star Wars invade everyday circumstances where they look bizarre and out of place. Through his cinematic staging, which includes underwater scenes and even stunts, Miyamoto invites drama and humor into his work.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Korean artist Won Beomsik disrupts the cohesiveness of city planning with his “Archisculpture” collage series, in which he cobbles together various buildings in unlikely ways. The latest addition to the series is “Archisculpture Antigravity,” in which he flips and reverses the orientation of edifices to defy physical laws. Won’s other series, “Dimension Finder,” turns buildings’ facades into kaleidoscopic patterns that look like portals into new dimensions. Using architecture as his visual language, he communicates ideas about perception and reality through these works.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

As a kid, dropping your ice cream on the sidewalk was a moment of bitter disappointment. Michael Massaia makes us remember this childlike feeling of sadness with his photographs of melted ice cream — a feeling that you know is petty yet still breaks your heart. The artist simply places popsicles on black plexiglass and watches them melt over time. The original shape of a Spiderman or Spongebob pop turns into a swirling, oil slick-like pattern of pastel colors. The melted sweets evoke a nostalgic longing for carefree summers on the playground. Ice cream pops, something we hadn’t previously given much thought to, turn out to be a pretty powerful sensory symbol.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Josephine Cardin’s background in dance comes through in her series of surreal self-portraits, many of which have digitally illustrated elements that take them into the realm of fantasy. With the series, Cardin explores the various identities one takes on in life, acting out emotions and frustrations in front of her camera. Moving gracefully in long, billowing gowns that amplify her movements, Cardin exposes her vulnerable side through body language and the careful inclusion of symbolic props.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Silvie De Burie was an avid scuba diver for 15 years before deciding to bring her camera with her underwater. Originally from Ghent, Belgium, she began diving and snorkeling off the island of Bunaken in Indonesia in her mid-twenties. Her passion for observing marine life now comes through in her high-definition underwater photographs of hard coral reefs. De Burie zooms in on the bright, repeating patterns of the coral to expose the psychedelic details on these precious organisms. She says that she hopes that her photos will educate and inspire her viewers to be more conscientious of the fragile state of the world’s oceans.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Theo Mercier is a young, French artist currently based in Mexico City. Working primarily in sculpture and photography, he often inventively incorporates found objects into his work. He arranges commonplace items in ways that can be grotesque or sexual, playing with the tension between alluring colors and textures and off-putting content.