by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Henrik Isaksson Garnell “sculpts” his imagery with natural elements such as bones and plant matter, manmade objects, digital effects, and electronic ephemera. The result includes his new series “In Treatment,” a meditation on psychotherapy. The work moves between the cerebral and the surreal.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The aspects of William Mortensen’s photography that were controversial during his lifetime—clever manipulation of imagery and dark themes—are now considered to be marks of his greatness. In the show “Witches” at Buckland Museum of Witchcraft and Magick, Stephen Romano Gallery offers both unseen work and iconic meditations on the occult from his output in the 1920s and ’30s. The exhibition runs August 3 through November 3 at the venue in Cleveland, Ohio.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kat Toronto, a.k.a. Miss Meatface, shows her stirring blend of performance art, photography, ceramics, zines, and more in a new exhibition at The Untitled Space in New York. The multidisciplinary artist, who was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 47, is offering work that the gallery says spans several years. The gallery says her works “explore cultural ideals of feminine beauty and the objectification of women in a feminist society by toying with the push and pull of dominance and submission, as well as the acts of revealing and concealing.” Her exhibitions runs through July 13.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Multidisciplinary artist Melissa Meier combines sculpture, photography, and other forms with surreal—and at times, visceral—results. Whether it’s the wearable, egg-filled sculptures in her “Skin” series or the unsettling masks in “Glass-Eyes,” Meier is able to create otherworldly looks tethered to the natural world.

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Photographer Ben Zank crafts surreal portraits that are strange and at times, humorous. The subjects captured by New York City-based artist are often shown without faces, their visages disappearing into foliage or smoke, or otherwise, buried into the Earth. Instead of depending on the human face, Zank says that “the image itself is the emotion.”

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Recent photography and costuming work by the duo Kahn & Selesnick chronicles the travels of Truppe Fledermaus, a cabaret troupe of “would-be mystics who catalogue their absurdist attempts to augur a future that seems increasingly in peril due to environmental pressures.” The “Book of Fate” works showcase the pair’s talents in both installation work and crafting narratives.