by Andy SmithPosted on

Olivier de Sagazan’s disconcerting events, a blend of painting, sculpture and performance art, brings his humanity-baring work across the globe. There’s both a psychological and animalistic quality to these wild pieces, the artist’s own body acting as his canvas. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Survival Research Laboratories, the group that pioneered machine performance art, appeared at this year’s Seattle Art Fair, which ended on Sunday. In several social media posts, SRL’s wild machines were shown in action. A feature on the history of the industrial art group appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 48.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist and performer Sasha Frolova is known for crafting synthetic experience, teeming with color and pop. Inside France’s Etretat Gardens, she recently staged an ode to Marie Antoinette (and her love of oysters) with her signature, inflatable fashion pieces, such as towering, faux hairdos, form-fitting suits, and in this case, a “a inflatable “boudoir-trampoline.” (Frolova is featured in the upcoming Hi-Fructose: New Contemporary Fashion, which you can read more about here.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

San Francisco-raised artist Kat Toronto blends performance art and photography under the working name of Miss Meatface, using both vintage Polaroid and contemporary methods. The artist says part of her work stems in having been diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2010 and subsequently having to receive a full hysterectomy. Toronto now uses her moniker “as an artistic and spiritual catalyst to delve into a complex set of questions about where she fits into society as a woman.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bangkok-born artist Rook Floro mixes installation, sculpture, performance art, and other approaches for a singular, visceral experience. A statement says that he “draws from contention in his own life, which he likes to visualize in different series of artwork.” Recently, his “Blastard” experiences express a particularly vibrant and personal version of the artist.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Olivier de Sagazan, a French painter, sculptor, and performance artist, has long used his body as a canvas for his absorbing and disconcerting pieces. Using layers of clay, paint, and his own physicality, the artist offers animalistic and spiritual performances that both deconstruct humanity and go beyond its confines. He’s performed these pieces across the world, from Shanghai and London to spots across the U.S.