by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Maude Alta carves away negative space to create snowflake-like paper-cut works filled with intricate details. Alta says that her intimate knowledge of her medium enables her to make such minuscule incisions. “When I cut paper, I feel as if I am peeling back the outer, superficial layer of our vision to reveal the secret space beneath,” she writes in her artist statement. Her works evoke line drawings with their many small markings. Many of them feature nature imagery that recalls folk art forms and storybook illustrations, though the narratives behind each of her works are not so obvious.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Russian paper-cut artist Asya Kozina recently created an ornate array of white wedding dresses inspired by Mongolian folkloric fashion designs. Though they resemble haute couture, the sculptural outfits are made entirely from paper. The St. Petersburg-based artist described the traditional Mongolian garments as “futuristic.” Her versions exaggerate their shapes and emphasize their geometric structure by removing the color. Kozina collaborated with photographer Anastasia Andreeva on a shoot featuring models donning her baroque pieces.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Russian artist Yulia Brodskaya creates playful illustrations, installations and paper cut works using a unique method she developed after leaving her graphic design job in 2006. The artist rolls tiny strips of colorful paper into spirals that she aggregates into larger shapes, creating textural works that lie somewhere on the horizon between two and three dimensions. Her whimsical, springy work invites a sense of optimism. While paper cut art is typically a small-scale medium, Brodskaya often creates mural-sized artworks and installations for commercial clients, using paper to transform rigid spaces into fantastical realms.