by Andy SmithPosted on

Jim Shaw‘s paintings are striking fusions of pop culture, political histories, and found, scenic backdrops. The artist’s varied approach has evolved over decades, with his recent work working with acrylics layered on muslin. Some of the works implement “theatrical scenic backdrops” purchased by Shaw, combining canvases from the 1940s and 1950s and his own style.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brazil native Alvaro Naddeo crafts intricate watercolor paintings that examine the consumption of the Western world through enormous, unlikely constructions. The artist, who has a background in advertising, has a particular knack for depicting discarded branded products. For some, his attention to detail and urban iconography likely recalls the work of Kevin Cyr, whose oil paintings have focused on graffiti-adorned vehicles.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The paintings of Brett Ferry, created using acrylics and oil on board, defy in both materials used and the components depicted. The blending of vibrant abstractions and natural forms feel like clashes of realities. The Australian artist’s works may deceive and appear as digital paintings, yet this simply part of the author’s charge.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Zimbabwe native Kudzanai-Violet Hwami’s engrossing work explores gender, spirituality, and differing cultures. Currently based in London, she crafts paintings that also implement pastels, charcoal, and other materials. Her work has been shown at the Royal Scottish Academy, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Shonibare Studios in London, and beyond.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new collection of paintings and drawings, Kevin Cyr pays tribute to the working class via worn vehicles spotted and documented around New York City. “Labor Day” at Jonathan Levine Projects in New Jersey progresses the artist’s love affair with the concept of what vehicles say about the people who drive them. Cyr first appeared in the pages of this magazine in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, and he’s part of the “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose” exhibit, currently at Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like “Landscape,” above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist’s own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you’re an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”