by Andy SmithPosted on

Zimbabwe native Kudzanai-Violet Hwami’s engrossing work explores gender, spirituality, and differing cultures. Currently based in London, she crafts paintings that also implement pastels, charcoal, and other materials. Her work has been shown at the Royal Scottish Academy, National Gallery of Zimbabwe, Shonibare Studios in London, and beyond.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new collection of paintings and drawings, Kevin Cyr pays tribute to the working class via worn vehicles spotted and documented around New York City. “Labor Day” at Jonathan Levine Projects in New Jersey progresses the artist’s love affair with the concept of what vehicles say about the people who drive them. Cyr first appeared in the pages of this magazine in Hi-Fructose Vol. 10, and he’s part of the “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose” exhibit, currently at Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like “Landscape,” above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist’s own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you’re an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Houston-born artist Shayne Murphy blends realism and the abstract, with his oil paintings featuring explosions of graphite. Using sharpened backdrops and geometric flourishes, the artist tilts perspectives and toys further with reality. Murphy currently has a solo show titled “Fluorescent Gray” at Anya Tish Gallery in Houston, which runs through Nov. 12.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Clive Barker, the British artist, film director, and author, comes to the Copro Gallery in Santa Monica with a new show. “Wunderkammer,” running Aug. 6-27, focuses on the artist’s neo-expressionist paintings. Like Barker’s work in other mediums, the subject matter leans toward fantasy and horror imagery. But as the title suggests (translated to mean the “Cabinet of Curiosities” of the Renaissance), there’s both a playful and mysterious nature to this body of work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Born in Tibet and raised in Dharamsala, India, Pema Rinzin uses centuries-old thangka techniques to create contemporary works. The result are fresh, gorgeous renderings in ground mineral pigments, Sumi ink, and gold. Rinzin’s personal charge is to bring an education on Tibetan art to the public and schools across the world.