by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Urs Fischer, based in New York, adapts the human face into topographical forms in his paintings. Works like “Landscape,” above, are crafted from aluminum panel, reinforced polyurethane foam, epoxy, acrylic ink, primer, paint, and silkscreen, and gesso. These paintings reorganize visages into landscapes, with the artist’s own face used in differing ways. The recent show “Mind Moves,” erected at Gagosian Gallery in San Francisco, was accompanied by a quote from the artist: “At its core, art is all about order. When you’re an artist, you basically arrange, rearrange, or alter; you play off order.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Houston-born artist Shayne Murphy blends realism and the abstract, with his oil paintings featuring explosions of graphite. Using sharpened backdrops and geometric flourishes, the artist tilts perspectives and toys further with reality. Murphy currently has a solo show titled “Fluorescent Gray” at Anya Tish Gallery in Houston, which runs through Nov. 12.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Clive Barker, the British artist, film director, and author, comes to the Copro Gallery in Santa Monica with a new show. “Wunderkammer,” running Aug. 6-27, focuses on the artist’s neo-expressionist paintings. Like Barker’s work in other mediums, the subject matter leans toward fantasy and horror imagery. But as the title suggests (translated to mean the “Cabinet of Curiosities” of the Renaissance), there’s both a playful and mysterious nature to this body of work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Born in Tibet and raised in Dharamsala, India, Pema Rinzin uses centuries-old thangka techniques to create contemporary works. The result are fresh, gorgeous renderings in ground mineral pigments, Sumi ink, and gold. Rinzin’s personal charge is to bring an education on Tibetan art to the public and schools across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Longtime followers of Japanese artist Kazuki Takamatsu may already know his process: painstaking gouache layers that recreate scenes first imagined on 3-D computer software. Yet, in his latest set of striking paintings at the Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles, the otherworldy nature of Takamatsu’s work is what again draws viewers into this haunted world of hologram-like characters. The solo show “Decoration Armament” opens this Saturday, and it features some of the HF Vol. 33 cover artist’s most ambitious and engrossing work yet.

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The beinArt Surreal Art Collective’s Kickstarter stretch-goal is almost 70% funded with only 48 hours to go! If the target is reached, the collective will open a new gallery space focusing on strange and imaginative figurative art. Exciting rewards for backers have been added throughout the campaign, such as drastically discounted original art, limited edition prints, signed art books, and more! These deals will only be available for the next 48 hours!