by CaroPosted on

The paintings of Los Angeles based artist Danny Galieote seem to have one foot in the past and one in the future, a style that he describes as “Pop Regionalism”, combining Pop art and Regionalism art aspects. Growing up, Galieote spent much of his time listening to his grandfather’s war stories, eventually going on to work as an animator on films like The Lion King, Tarzan and Hercules at Disney’s Florida studio, a job that requires fundamental understanding of the human figure and stylizing it to suit animation. His command of drawing the figure and appreciation for art and history between the 1920s and 1950s comes together in his uniquely American imagery, recalling those days of the American heartland with apparent modern touches.

by CaroPosted on

While collecting stones along the east coast of his hometown in Maine, it dawned on artist Alan Magee how the beauty of an object draws in its own attention. His hyperrealistic acrylic and oil paintings look unbelievably like photographs, capturing the quiet intensity of those stones, pebbles and rocks that demanded his contemplation. Each is arranged in softly lit, zen like compositions, where Magee has stacked them like cairns or on top of other objects, while in other pieces, they appear scattered like a starry Milky Way galaxy, bleached white by the sun and sand with their own stories to tell.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

On October 14th, French artists 100TAUR and Hisham Echafaki will debut new works in their two-person exhibition, “Lusus Naturae” in London. Borrowing their title from a Latin phrase that describes any creature or specimen that defies classification, the exhibit will include a series of paintings, drawings and three-dimensional works that depict “freaks of nature”. Their works feature fantastical hybrid creatures alongside some of the world’s most bizarre members of fauna. Both 100TAUR’s portrayals of mythical monsters in their dark world and Echafaki’s intricate, pattern-filled works explore the human fascination with oddities or monstrosities along with our fragile relation with the nature.

by CaroPosted on

Jakub Rozalski (aka “Mr. Werewolf”) is a Polish concept artist and illustrator who describes the world in his paintings as a futuristic 1920s Eastern Europe, or “1920+”. Previously featured on our blog, Rozalski’s works contrast the soft nostalgia of 19th and 20th century inspired scenery under attack against giant mecha robots. While warring nations combat mechanical beasts in epic battles that feel alien and also vaguely familiar, Polish shepards and farmers in the countryside work their land alongside wild animals. “I like to mix historical facts and situations with my own motives, ideas and visions,” he says, “I attach great importance to the details, the equipment, the costumes, because it allows you to embed painting within a specified period of time.”

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Born in Cologne, Germany, former tattoo artist Mike Dargas paints portraits of women dripping in honey. His hyperrealistic oil paintings are painted on a large-scale and appear as impressive photographs. With such provocative titles as “Golden Thoughts,” “The Ecstasy of Gold,” and “Carpe Diem Baby,” the portraits exude a certain opulence, suggesting honey as a metaphor for gold. Using this analogy, his paintings may be interpreted as commentaries on the role of monetary wealth in contemporary society. With closed eyes and probing tongues, Dargas’ women become greedy narcissists caught in moments of private ecstasy.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Monica Rohan paints self-portraits in which she is eternally hiding behind and searching within vibrant, patterned textiles and luscious, green plants. The Australian artist is inspired by her own “rural-idyll” childhood and the “internal longing of the 19th century novel.” Her characters express these investigations through a sentiment of both innocent play and anxious isolation. Forests and flowers, dresses and blankets become extensions of her characters’ physical and psychological beings. By always concealing the women’s faces, Rohan relies on body language to convey the characters’ emotional states. For example, some characters are seen from a birds-eye view, curled with their heads burrowed in patchwork quilts. Others thrash and dance; the movement causing the women’s outer dresses to become indistinguishable from their physical forms.