by Andy SmithPosted on


The career of painter-cartoonist Guy Colwell is explored in an upcoming retrospective at 111 Minna Gallery. “Walking, Talking, Stalking” tracks the artist’s work from the 1990s to present. Colwell says that the pieces “should each be read as an essay about the state of life from the perspective of one big primate at this moment in time.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Africa-born, Mexico-based painter Christiaan Conradie mixes abstraction and the figurative, injecting delicate realism, otherworldly forms, and sculptural elements into the canvas. Influences like Rembrandt, Twombly, and Rubens are part of an ongoing dialogue in Conradie’s work.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Sean Landers blends varying styles in his paintings, using both surrealism and references to art history to toy with the viewers’ expectations. The artist uses sculpture, photography, drawing, and other approaches to accomplish this, yet in his paintings, he takes a particularly surreal approach to reveal “the process of artistic creation through humor and confession, gravity and pathos.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Japanese artist Koichi Enomoto packs his oil paintings with manga influences, dystopian visions, and pop culture nods. Often, these pieces offer a dialogue about mankind’s relationship with technology, in particular. The artist calls his work “my private myth, like a vision, rising from the relations between my own and public reality.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


Mia Brownell, a Chicago-based artist and daughter of a sculptor and biophysicist, has a new body of work that she says “simultaneously draw on scientific images of platelets (tiny blood cells shaped like plates) and the history of the painted food still life.” The new series is called “Plate to Platelets: and other things that travel and bind,” and it features several new palette paintings. Brownell is featured in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 Boxset.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Guy Petruzzi uses watercolor and acrylics on synthetic paper for his vivid explorations on ecological disaster. The vibrant pops across these scenes from the natural world may be intriguing, but they tell a story far more ugly. As fellow painters Lauren Marx and Tiffany Bozic explore the dire consequences of our actions in meditations on life and death, Petruzzi also adds to this conversation a clashing and blending of textures and materials.