by Andy SmithPosted on

Exploring the reality of “distorted or inaccessible memories,” Eliana Marinari applies several layers of aerosol acrylic paint over ink and pastel drawings. In the artist’s “Recognition Memory” and “Recollection” series, portraits and still-life works are given this treatment, respectively. The resulting work is both haunting and brings reflection on our own limitations, as viewers.

by Andy SmithPosted on

There’s a shapeshifting quality to the paintings Ricardo Estrada, whose subjects are physically inhabited by cultural iconography. The Los Angeles native specifically focuses on Chicano culture, whether in his murals or acrylic paintings. Each carries intricate brushwork that allows Estrada to transition between differing textures and planes of reality.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new exhibition at Lotte Museum in Seoul, more than 500 works from artist James Jean are on display, from large-scale paintings and installations to to video art and stained glass sculptures. “Eternal Journey” opened on April 4 and runs through Sept. 1. Jean is in the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 Box Set, and was the cover artist for three issues: Vol. 48, Vo. 30, and Vol. 15.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ellen de Meijer’s new paintings show how contemporary norms and social mobility has come at the cost of our planet’s health. “#CO2,” a show opening at UNIX Gallery on April 11, shows characters at times taking small measures to protect themselves from the elements, while the greater threat to all looms. The gallery says that in this show, viewers can find “a collection of stoic, uncomfortable characters unabashedly displaying their wealth.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The dark surrealist sculptures and paintings of Jeremy Cross return in a new show at Dark Art Emporium, titled “Speaking In Ghosts.” Kicking off Saturday at the gallery, the recent works by the artist include his “Ghost Skull” series of busts.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Debra Baxter

Through two concurrent shows, Roq La Rue Gallery shows a pair of artists whose work carries crystalline forms. Debra Baxter‘s “Ghost Heart” and Rebecca Chaperon‘s “Incandescence” take over the gallery in April. Baxter’s sculptures, sometimes wearable, integrate natural forms into objects packed with both centuries-old narratives and humor. Chaperon’s surreal paintings share in Baxter’s fascination with the mystical, while also exploring escapism and the light and dark natures of the world.