by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

It’s blistering cold outside, but the whiskey is keeping you warm and the crackling of the record player is drowning out the howling wind outside. Jonathan Viner’s new paintings for his upcoming solo show “Cold Snap” immerses the viewer in stylized, retro images of this sort of wintery paradise. Filled with nostalgic imagery and elements of ’70s counterculture, his paintings are rife with intrigue amid their idyllic milieu. The works take on an illustrative quality as they let viewers in on an art theft in progress or what looks like an erotic encounter gone awry. “Cold Snap” opens at Sloan Fine Art in New York on October 24 and will be on view through November 2.

by Soojin ChangPosted on

Thursday night’s opening of Alex Gross’s “Future Tense” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York’s Chelsea district greeted viewers with a heavy dose of consumer culture. The exhibition initially comes off as accessible and playfully reflective of modern addictions, yet the works as a group are rather grim and much harder to swallow than their glossy, candy-colored exteriors would suggest.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Curated by artist Gromyko Semper, “Endangered Visions” is a group show with a wide breadth of artists but a short longevity. Set to premiere at ManilART, the Philippines’ largest annual art fair, October 15 through 19, the show features dozens of Filipino and international artists who work with surreal imagery, albeit in vastly different ways. “‘Endangered Visions’ seeks to counterbalance an art world driven by a rapacious market with something more contemplative, subtle and challenging,” said Semper in an email to Hi-Fructose. In addition to organizing the show, he will be one of the exhibiting artists alongside Jana Brike, Teiji Hayama, Kirsten Stingle and many others. Take a look at our preview below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Idyllic paintings of daily life set centuries ago are spliced with a dystopian sci-fi fantasy in German artist Jakub Rozalski’s work. Nostalgic elements clash with futuristic ones as giant robots invade the European countryside. Soldiers, armed with rifles and on horseback, are powerless against the mechanical beasts. Unlike much sci-fi inspired work, Rozalski’s paintings have a painterly quality to them that evokes the loose expressiveness of Impressionism. He convincingly inserts the robots into scenes that would otherwise appear straight out of the late 19th or early 20th century, inviting viewers to imagine a starkly different version of history than the one we know today.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Though their styles differ, Hikari Shimoda (featured in HF Vol. 29) and Camilla D’Errico each use a fluorescent color palette and childlike, illustrative imagery to apprehend adult anxieties. The two artists teamed up for their two-person show “Niji Bambini” (which combines Japanese and Italian, the artists’ native tongues, to translate to “Rainbow Children”), opening at Brooklyn’s Cotton Candy Machine on October 10.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Sometimes life throws a wrench into our comfy plans and we’re faced with some big questions. As an artist, the question often is – do I quit and accept the defeat? Or, do I rise up triumphantly and make something beautiful to recapture this moment? Anthony Hurd is an artist that has learned to embrace the surprises in life as well as in his work, creating images that seem to arrive to us from some distant land. He depicts psychedelic landscapes of perilous beauty.