by Margot BuermannPosted on


Italian artist Vesod exhibits a new collection of paintings and drawings in E-horizon, opening today at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. Viewers will be treated to eight works on canvas and paper, as well as a site-specific installation. Vesod is recognized for his perception-altering creations that offer the illusion of three-dimensionality. He often depicts human figures traversing through geometric environments, which are reflective of the “eternal present”. The exhibition is on view through October 29.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrea Wan, a Hong Kong-born artist based in Berlin, eloquently conveys both inner dialogue and a sense of exploration in her work. Whether it’s ink and gouache paintings or murals on walls across the world, her work is marked by a mix of human bodies, disparate objects, roadways, and other structures that lead in and out of the psyche. Wan was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Mexican artist and arts educator Claudio Dicochea is best known for his contemporary reworkings of 18th century casta paintings, featuring a plethora of media idols and public figures sourced from world history and popular culture. Dicochea describes his work as “a contemporary re-examination of mestizaje, or mixed race identity” that explores “the legacy of colonial representation, hybrid identity, and contemporary media stereotypes.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on

Julie Speed is an American artist known for her meticulous and startling contemporary works. Her paintings, etchings and collages present bizarre imagery that is rife with absurdity, violence and anxiety, and have been described as both disturbing and beautiful. Though constantly labeled a “Neo Surrealist”, Speed describes herself as a “Pararealist”, offering a glimpse into a world that exists parallel to our own reality.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


In her paintings and ink drawings of anthropomorphous forms, Belarusian artist Alina Kunitsyna shares her personal fascination with people, and the ways in which we can simultaneously conceal and express our inward nature. Her series portrays figures obscured within garments, blankets and decorative fabrics, their faces always hidden from our view. And while her subjects may carry an air of mystery, it is through the expressions of their outer shells that we may begin to gain access to their inner worlds.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Though viewers may not know the narratives of Karla Ortiz’s painted and drawn figures, her absorbing pieces inspire conjecture. Outside of her fine art work, Ortiz is a concept artist for Marvel Film Studios, and in the past, Industrial Light & Magic and Ubisoft. She’s also illustrated products for Wizards of the Coast and Tor Books. All speak to Ortiz’s talent for storytelling, even when the subjects are unfamiliar to the viewer.