by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, the work of Canadian artist Brandon Constans may appear to be collage. Instead, the Ontario-based artist paints each of the objects and creatures used to build single figures. Several of the artist’s paintings are created using a process he describes as “a technique of overlapping acrylic paint and Matte Medium in various ways to create a two-dimensional embossed surface.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Brin Levinson’s paintings depict worlds in which humans have lived, but now animals seem to rule. These ghost towns, with similar landmarks and industrial vibes to the city the Portland resident calls home, imply that mankind’s abuse of the land and its creatures resulted in its exit. These works appear in a new show from Levinson, titled “Anthropocene,” which now hits Antler Gallery in Portland. The show lasts through Nov. 22. Levinson was most recently featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Past work from Pamela Tait, an artist based in the Scottish Highlands, seemed to focus on humans with flourishes of the fantastic. Yet over the past few years, strange creatures have appeared more and more in Tait’s work. Works like “Nobody could deny the magnetic qualities of the naked mole rat,” above, may be anchored by a creature from reality, but it’s surrounded by an odd array of characters. Tait was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The cover for Hi-Fructose Magazine Vol. 41 comes from painter Greg “Craola” Simkins, an artist based in Los Angeles. In this post, you can take a look at how he created the piece that would become this cover. See those photos and a video below. Simkins was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Eguchi Ayane is a Japanese artist whose oil paintings transport the viewer to candy-colored fantasy lands. Yet within these whimsical worlds, startling scenarios unfold. Juxtaposing ‘cutesy’ images of teddy bears, bow ties and charming creatures with the darker undercurrent of her narratives, the artist expresses the duality of not only her world, but ours as well. Find more of her work on Twitter.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Marlène Mocquet is a French artist whose chimerical paintings and sculptures portray strange worlds full of quirky, animated characters. Her surreal creations often have a sense of childlike whimsy and humor; other times, they turn dark and tumultuous, and verging on grotesque.