by Andy SmithPosted on

Redd Walitzki‘s fantastical paintings offers a vision of people fully engrossed into the natural world, with magical implications. In a show at Haven Gallery, “The Midsommar Dream,” the artist calls upon ancient folktales and dreamlike visions. Walitzki was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Caroline Westerhout’s cerebral paintings are selective in rendering aspects of the body faithfully, otherwise distorting the female form and offering unexpected textures. Though this may bring disconcerting results, each of the works carry a vulnerable and honest quality.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Matthew Palladino’s paintings, the textures of watercolors and the artist’s dexterity in form combine to forge works with a spiritual quality. The ghostly works carry a humor and vibrancy that offer a contrast with his skeletal or distorted subjects.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Edward Kinsella III has a knack for crafting monsters. Using just a few hues and strokes, the St. Louis artist creates haunting portraits and illustrations that are seemingly simple, yet wholly cerebral. Though young, the artist has forged his career in both gallery shows and a teaching practice.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Avery Singer’s acrylic paintings blend abstract and figurative sensibilities, with a process that’s just as diverse. Her underdrawing is crafted using 3D software, and then, the artist applies the traditional material over that framework. In the past, much of her work has been grayscaled, though her recent experimentations with color offer new life to this style.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using acrylics, black gesso, gold leaf, and wood, Tenmyouya Hisashi calls upon the history of Japanese painting in narratives and creations that span the past, present, and future. These works render a robotic transport with the same elegance of centuries-old weaponry. His sweeping battles scenes and portraits function under the banner of his “Neo Nihonga” style.