by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter Edward del Rosario’s theatrical, yet controlled tableaus carry cross-cultural references. Often in the artist’s work, each of the characters seem to have their own narrative or motivation, creating a piece teeming with both humor and surprising complexity, once absorbed.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Over the past few years, many of Ivy Haledeman’s intimate paintings have focused on an anthropomorphic female hot dog character. The character bends and lounges across the canvas, often extending most of its form out of our view. While surely offering more erotic themes to extract, Haldedeman’s paintings also seem to be offering reflections on the capitalistic system that produces “hot dogs” themselves.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Though gorgeously rendered, Chester Arnold’s paintings don’t idealize the state of nature. It depicts how, despite humanity’s best efforts, the Earth endures the accumulation of humanity’s waste and development. Cascading piles of tires and trash becomes their own mountainous formations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Mecro’s recent body of work, displayed in a show at Arch Enemy Arts, he uses letters as the building blocks of natural forms. “Verdigris” collected aerosol and oil work that recalls his work within graffiti culture. See several of those works from that body of work below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sebastián Gutiérrez crafts two-layered portraits that reveal something less elegant beneath the surface. This particular series from the Puerto Rican artist, titled “Inner Beauty,” is a study in contrast. A statement says that “though his main medium is oil paint, its usually presented on everyday items such as doors, rugs, windows or toys; he wants to give the spectator an instant sense of familiarity.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist PixelPancho is known for a fascination with robots, yet his massive murals go beyond contemplations on technology and into metaphysical territory. His work, found on walls across the world, offer an interconnected narrative from piece to piece, gradually unfolding the painter’s broad examination of what it means to be human.