by Andy SmithPosted on

In the oil and acrylic paintings of Samuel Weinberg, the artist’s narratives pit his violent, cartoonish “Pinkmen” against the “Realies,” based on real characters and art historical figures. This clash of style and tone create absorbing scenes crafted at the hand of the artist, often looming large in size and action.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Elizabeth Glaessner utilizes water-dispersed pigment and inks in her absorbing, vibrant scenes and portraits. The works, moving reality and dreamlike settings, explore humanity in their imperfect forms. Often, her work is pulling from both mythology and her own experiences in her paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using the Mongol zurag style of painting, Baatarzorig Batjargal brings a contemporary and globe-spanning mentality into the century-old approach. A native of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, the artist’s distinctive observance of tradition puts a fascinating spotlight on how his home has changed.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Adehla Lee says she wants her work “to give the viewer a sense of visual pleasure through psychological intimidation.” Her wild, candy-colored acrylic paintings reinforce that notion, packing mountains of treats, abstractions, and unexpected iconography onto each canvas. The South Korea-born, New York City-based artist also works in installation and sculpture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

An exhibition currently running at National Portrait Gallery features Michael Jackson-inspired art, with Mark Ryden‘s cover for the 1991 record “Dangerous” prominently featured. But it’s not just the original painting: Ryden crafted an entirely new work, “The King of Pop,” to house the piece.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The chimerical paintings of Yosuke Ueno return in a new show at Thinkspace Projects. “But Beautiful,” kicking off this weekend, features works from the self-taught, Tokyo-based painter that take influence from “everything from Japanese culture, ancient Greek mythology, Tokyo Street fashion and video games to Disney animation and the Western canon of art history.” Ueno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.