by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Michael Page explores dreamworlds with his oil and acrylic paintings, using atypical color schemes and kinetic scenes. In his new body of work, “Nostalgia Kills,” Page focuses on the vibrancy and wonder of childhood. His new solo show at Corey Helford Gallery kicks off Jan. 21 and runs through Feb. 18.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Erin McCarty, an Alaska-born, Arizona-based painter, creates large-scale gouache works that mix influences like the natural world, the human body, and the abstract ideas and emotions surrounding our place in the world. After graduating from the Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland in 2010, the artist worked in the Oregan area before returning to her home state of Alaska, where she recharged and created a new body of work inspired by the region. These days, she lives in Tucson, where she’s inspired by a new terrain and ecosystem.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nick Runge, a Los Angeles-based artist, crafts dreamlike and moody paintings of mysterious figures and scenes. Though these works carry flashes of realism, these works carry abstractions that either push backdrops into otherworldly territory or interfere with the subject itself.

by Andy SmithPosted on

J. S. Weis, a Portland-based artist and designer, depicts scenes and creatures from nature in his drawings and paintings. And he includes the factor often removed from studies of the natural world: all of the unnatural stuff humans add to it. In two series, “unNaturalist” and “Specimens,” it’s not uncommon to see gorgeous reptiles writhing among cigarette butts or birds among sandwich bags. Weis was last featured on HiFructose.com here, ahead of his “Liquid Hymn” show at 1AM Gallery in 2014.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Hiroaki Ito’s paintings and drawings, he depicts Japanese businessmen—referred to as “salarymen” in their respective country—in perpetual states of submission, anguish, self-assuredness, and general unrest. His intimate angles, often below the subject, looking up, punctuate the moods he evokes with these suited, white-collar workers. These men and women are caught in mid-apology, somber reflection, or even near-vomiting.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Sam Octigan, an Australian artist, mixes the figurative and the abstract in his paintings. His subjects sometimes are enveloped in these abstractions and disparate objects. Otherwise, they comprise these figures, like memories or something more haunting. Even when the artist limits his palette to varying shades of gray, his works absorb and convey kineticism.