by Andy SmithPosted on


Travis Louie’s creatures carry Victorian and Edwardian vibes, rendered in the artist’s distinctive, fantastical style. A show at Creatura House, the new Seattle venue from Roq La Rue Gallery founder Kirsten Anderson, collects a new set of paintings and drawings from the artist. Louie was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. He and artist Travis Lampe also recently created the art for the card throwing/tile game Vampires vs. Unicorns: Floor War, constructed by game designer Jim DuBois and Hi-Fructose co-founder Attaboy.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Giovanni Forlino’s vibrant paintings and drawings move between dreamlike scenes, grotesque characters, and wild creatures of the natural world. His surreal, monstrous subjects, in particular, fill the space as if they are on the cusp of breaking out of it.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Four months after it was announced that Kehinde Wiley and Amy Sherald would be painting the presidential portraits for former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama, the pieces have been unveiled. Wiley, who was the cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 36, debuted a characteristically vibrant and absorbing portrait for the 44th President of the United States, seated against an overgrowth of flowers and foliage. Sherald’s striking painting of the former first lady implemented a dress with a design reminiscent of the work of Dutch abstract painter Piet Mondrian. Sherald was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Extracted from Baroque and Rococo paintings of the masters, figures painted by Angela Fraleigh defy their original intentions and are recontextualized in a less constrained reality. For Fraleigh, the frivolity of these classical scenes was wholly manufactured. In Fraleigh’s paintings, which often mix media, the possibilities are greater in numbers and less worldly in scope.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Lee Jinju’s surreal scenes and studies, often rendered in Korean paint on linen, explore memory and psychological iconography. Her paintings move between sparse elements and intricate narratives. A statement reminds us that “negative events and emotions of the past, which were not even wanted, endlessly appear and disappear within the everyday life.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here and appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dominik Schmitt’s oil and acrylic paintings carry flashes of dark surrealism, clinical diagrams, and a provocative, humorous sensibility. The German painter’s use of text, often paired with specific elements of a work or buried under abstraction, add another layer of intrigue to each strange narrative. The artist’s work has been shown across Europe.