by Andy SmithPosted on


Anthony Hurd’s vibrant, chaotic landscapes carry the complexity of our emotional states. They are at once elegant and arrested, inviting and dangerous. Overall, it may seem like a more abstract direction for the artist, yet in another sense, it’s explorations are wholly human. Hurd says several life events are in the make-up of this work: the loss of a sibling, the end of a relationship, mental hardship, and several other factors play into these paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Emily Blythe Jones combines painting and sculpture in a way that feels both universally nostalgic and intimate. The Los Angeles-based artist crafts portraits, with 2D and 3D peeks into the past “inspired by an inherited family archive of photographs, oral histories and other ephemera from her Midwestern background.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nicolas Romero, also known as “Ever,” is a street artist who has delved into oil and acrylic works in recent years. His strange portraits blend the abstract and the real, each packed with both humor and earnestness. In recent years, as evidenced below, he’s always displayed these paintings as animated GIFs.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ian Francis crafts mixed-media paintings packed with ghostly abstractions and figures that appear as evaporating memories. The artist uses a combination of oil, ink, acrylics, and other materials to create each work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

“Bhabharosi” at Nicodim Gallery in Los Angeles is the first solo show from Simphiwe Ndzube outside Cape Town, South Africa, the artist’s hometown. The strange, headless and limbless figures that travel throughout the paintings and sculptures of Ndzube have their own mythology. Read about the lore below:

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Korea-raised, Melbourne-based artist Kim Hyunji (also known as Kim Kim Kim) crafts stirring oil portraits that experiment with texture and movement. The artist has said that unlike photographs, “painting no longer relies on flatness; instead it has branched out in the expanded field where I see paint as a sculptural material to add physicality to my portraits.”