by Nick PizanaPosted on

Despite what we may sometimes think, our memories are extremely faulty, open to influence from new information, and seen through the lens of our current emotions. This is the concept used by Kyle Stewart in his latest body of work, which explores the change in his memories of rural life after moving to Toronto. His solo show “Between Worlds” debuts at Parlor Gallery in Asbury Park, New Jersey on September 13.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Originally from Korea, David Choong Lee (featured in HF Vol. 30) has been a staple of San Francisco’s art scene for the past 20 years. Known for his elaborate assemblages composed of individual paintings on boxes on different depths, Lee deftly blends figuration with abstract dreamscapes, inserting realistically-rendered figures into explosions of shapes and kaleidoscopic colors. For his latest body of work, however, Lee emptied his paintings of human presence. His solo show “Cosmic Dust,” opening at Luna Rienne Gallery in San Francisco on September 13, will feature a series of acrylic paintings on canvas that focus on Lee’s intergalactic worlds — untouched and uninhabited. Honing in on the psychedelic imagery that once served as a background for his figures, he unfurls pools of liquid rainbows, mysterious glowing orbs and powerful beams of light. His new work gives the sensation of touching down on another planet.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chinese artist Liu Bolin is a chameleon. From a first glance, his most well-known works look like photos of newsstands and famous paintings. But as one looks closer, the artist’s body emerges, painted head-to-toe to blend in with his surroundings. It’s like when Duchamp scribbled R. Mutt on his famous urinal and deemed it art, except for Bolin forces his audience to contemplate mundane objects and scenarios in a fine art context by inserting himself into these scenes. The theme of disappearance is fundamental here, as Bolin chooses subjects that highlight the hidden ills often cloaked in attractive packaging and glossy images. His latest solo show, “A Colorful World?” at Klein Sun Gallery is decidedly politically charged.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at Gauntlet Gallery in San Francisco is “Au9usto” — as the title suggests, a playful group show featuring nine artists with a penchant for experimentation. There’s the dark surrealism of Wednesday Kirwan, a fully-functional guillotine sculpture by Sam Lamott and heavily tattooed vintage celebrity portraits by Cheyenne Randall. Bennett Slater offers an irreverent take on neo-Classicism, Justin Hopkins distorts perspectives and Rebecca Adams takes us into a Richter-esque time warp. Take a look at some of the works in the show and catch the exhibition on view through September 20.

by Sasha BogojevPosted on

A couple of weeks ago, Pejac shared a simple window drawing on his Facebook profile, as a tribute to legendary French high-wire walker, Philippe Petit. The drawing was done using acrylic on a window glass to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Petit’s walk between the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. This simple idea, captured on camera by his friend Silvia Guinovart Pujol, shows the riskiness and fragility of the art of tightrope and is a great example of the Spanish artist’s style: simple, minimalist yet effective.