by Andy SmithPosted on


Thomas Gieseke’s surreal paintings are packed with vibrant and playful imagery, often with a sardonic edge. His works often feature lush backgrounds and creatures from the animal kingdom with flashes of the Western World. Works like “The Extrovert Leaves the Introvert to His Own Devices” show a cynicism and humor toward contemporary attitudes.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexander Reisfar’s eerie paintings are packed with intricate creatures and dark surrealist undertones. Both brooding and elegant, works created by the Oregon-based artist have been features across the U.S. The artist is able to navigate political and wartime themes with the iconography depicted in his paintings.

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Scott Musgrove’s 7.5-foot-tall, 12-foot-wide triptych “The Sanctuary” is finally complete. The artist spent nearly three years on the piece—made from oil on panel, wood, bronze, and glass—while simultaneously working on shows and other projects. (Musgrove was last featured on HiFructose.com here.) Below, the artist shares exclusive commentary on the creation of this piece with Hi-Fructose.

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Lien Truong calls her recent works “a frenetic amalgamation of western and Asian painting techniques and philosophies.” The artist’s choice of materials—oils, silk, thread, cotton, acrylics, and antique 24k gold-leaf obi thread—create an absorbing cacophony of culture and honed skills. The series “Mutiny in the Garden,” in particular, take on varying and converging histories.

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Colin Chillag‘s paintings blend the vivid and realistic alongside unfinished, preliminary parts of the work intact. The effect is not only disconstructive in looking at how memory functions in art, but also exploring the process of painting itself. Chillag was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gwen M.Y. Yip crafts minimalist paintings that explore both themes of loneliness and the shapes and stark structures of urban environments. Based on her travels through London, New York City, Hong Kong, and Amsterdam, she’s able to show the universality of solitude in these settings. Her subjects wait for trains, walk sidewalks, and carry literal and metaphorical weights on their backs.