by Margot BuermannPosted on


Australian artist Kate Shaw combines “paint pours”, collage, glitters and inks to render psychedelic landscapes. The colorful images yield awe-inspiring effects, yet are accompanied with a dark undertone. While they may capture the “transcendent beauty” of nature, at the same time they hint at the troubling environmental changes brought on by human activity.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Emma Hopkins describes her work as painting “people from the inside out.” This idea seems to work on both physical and emotional levels, as her arresting portraits and meditations are teeming with vulnerability. Her subjects are often unclothed, and even when she focuses on isolated body parts or strips off their skin, humanity is present.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Amy Hill – “Apathy”

New York-based artist Amy Hill puts her contemporary spin on the work of 15th century painter Hans Memling in her series of oil paintings titled Seven Deadly Sins. Hill is known for adapting the styles of early Dutch and Flemish Renaissance painting and placing historical subjects within modern day settings. On her website, the artist writes, “I chose these eras because of my stylistic kinship with their artists, which allows me to carry on a kind of dialogue with them… I have chosen portraiture as it is a genre that runs through art history and allows me through poses, gestures and fashion detail to make social, psychological and anthropological statements about my subjects.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


San Francisco-based visual artist Nicholas Bohac contemplates “the big picture” in his immersive, mixed media works that feature celestial figures amidst dreamlike landscapes. In his artist statement, Bohac writes that his purpose is “to question the universe and where, exactly, people fit into it… Through my work, I aim to explore the overall phenomenon of what it means to be human, past, present and future.”

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Italian artist Vesod exhibits a new collection of paintings and drawings in E-horizon, opening today at Mirus Gallery in San Francisco. Viewers will be treated to eight works on canvas and paper, as well as a site-specific installation. Vesod is recognized for his perception-altering creations that offer the illusion of three-dimensionality. He often depicts human figures traversing through geometric environments, which are reflective of the “eternal present”. The exhibition is on view through October 29.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andrea Wan, a Hong Kong-born artist based in Berlin, eloquently conveys both inner dialogue and a sense of exploration in her work. Whether it’s ink and gouache paintings or murals on walls across the world, her work is marked by a mix of human bodies, disparate objects, roadways, and other structures that lead in and out of the psyche. Wan was last mentioned on Hi-Fructose.com here.