by Andy SmithPosted on

Before painting, Emma Webster first constructs dioramas with backdrops, lighting, and clay figures. What is created from those collaged maquettes are stirring paintings that examine both our own natural environments and world-building as a concept. Her recent show at Diane Rosenstein, “Arcadia,” collected those recent oil paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chris Peters, an artist who emerged out of the Pop Surrealist movement, has used A.I. in a new way to create paintings of landscapes that don’t actually exist. Using an algorithm “capable of ‘learning’ and ‘predicting,'” Peters fed the system a trove of curated landscape paintings. Soon, the A.I. was able to produce new digital images, and after processing and curating those landscapes, Peters painted his favorites in oil.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The work in Fintan Magee‘s “The Big Dry” explores the artist’s personal experiences during Australia’s “Millennium drought.” The show starts at Thinkspace Gallery today and runs through June 23. Magee was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The intimate paintings of London-based artist Emma Hopkins carry both vulnerability and absorbing detail, as rendered in oil in the artist’s visceral style. Each of the works carry a story, often directly depicting a subject Hopkins knows. “When I work with people I develop a body of work based on the individuals themselves and the ideas that come from the experience of working with them,” the artist says. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jessica Hess’s paintings of time-worn structures feel patched together like memories, carrying signs of past stages and residents. The artist’s ongoing dialogue with “survey of derelict spaces void of human presence,” as described in one statement, takes a more vibrant turn in how these buildings evolve. Though none of these paintings features humans, all take on a ghostly personality, as rendered by Hess. She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ron English‘s oil paintings have long entertained, bewildered, and challenged viewers in each’s absorbing strangeness. In a new show at Corey Helford Gallery, titled “TOYBOX: America in the Visuals,” the artist offers his latest body of work. The pop art legend’s show starts Dec. 2 and runs through Dec. 30. The new collection deploys “the artist’s long established visual vocabulary into multi-layered narratives of ambition and imagination.” English was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.