by Andy SmithPosted on

Joanne Nam’s oil paintings often focus on females or animals against desolate, wooded backdrops. Each stares off in contemplation, with Nam’s single-word titles often offering context with descriptors like “Lucid,” “Numb,” or “Belong.” Her recent works are even more dreamlike, blending in touches of gold leaf. Nam was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ben Howe’s arresting oil paintings offer hyperdetailed and eerie reflections on humanity. A new show at beinArt Gallery in Australia collects his newest paintings under the titled “Weave.” The new show tackles “themes of mortality, isolation, longing, melancholy and loss and sits somewhere between the physical constraints of reality and the anarchic realm of the subconscious.” Howe was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Toni Hamel’s recent oil paintings explore our relationship with the natural world. In particular, Hamel shows us how our selfishness and dominion over animals taken an even more disastrous turn. These pieces are part of a body of work called “The Land of Id.” She was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Swiss artist Till Rabus crafts realistic oil paintings that exhibit both a whimsical and darker side to nostalgia. His version of a “Transformer” may consist of household objects, and his combined Disney dolls hint at the toll time takes on the icons of youth. The artist’s striking style may make viewers mistake the works for manipulated photographs, at first glance.

by Andy SmithPosted on


The oil paintings of Michael Hutter offer worlds that contain elements of fantasy, science, and something even further beyond reality. The German artist has been giving glimpses of these worlds for the past few decades, toying with familiar elements and narratives.

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Amy Sherald’s oil paintings are arresting portraits, absorbing in their choices of palette and mood. Within her works’ titles, we’re given further insight into the personalities of these figures, like “What’s Precious Inside Of Him Does Not Care To Be Known By The Mind In Ways That Diminish Its Presence (All American)” and “Try On Dreams Until I Find The One That Fits Me. They All Fit Me.” Yet, these works stand alone as engrossing, vibrant odes to individualism. For a recent show at Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, the venue said that the artist creates “imagined figures based on real-life interactions, subverting and exploring notions of black identity through her unique sense of visual culture, color and line.”