by Andy SmithPosted on

In her manipulations of the face and artistic form, L.A. Bryson creates oil portraits that find humanity in distortion. Her paintings are at once elegant and chaotic in execution, her dedicated “wet-to-wait” process requiring singles sessions between 6 and 10 hours in duration. With her toying with the texture of oils, the artist is both a sculptor and a painter.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hannah Yata‘s paintings explore both nature and the subconcious, with vivid, vibrant scenes. The work can feel both romantic and and allegorical, with a recent set of works embodying both in “Exile” at Phaneros Gallery in Nevada City, Calif. This body of work explores the story of Adam and Eve in a way true to Yata’s form. Yata was recently featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 45.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Claire Scherzinger builds worlds in her paintings, crafting alien ecosystems that offer metaphors of our own Western lives. The recent series “Exoplanet: Arca-45672,” in particular, has scenes with a distinct palette and lifeforms whose narratives beg to be deciphered. Works like “Baptism before the vacuum cloud storm” shows a ceremony both familiar and curious, rendered in oils and spraypaint.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Tom French‘s series “Parallax Paintings,” the artist’s fractured, stark approach has stirring effects. The artist limiting his palette adds to the cerebral nature of the work, with figure and abstractions blending in elegant cacophonies. In a statement, the artist’s work is described as looking at a spectrum, rather than a single state of mind.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The work of Margaret Curtis moves between provocative and quiet moments, each reflecting both on our current social climate and the act of painting itself. She has said that her process is “a geological process of layering and erosion.” In a statement, she offers some insight into the more consistent themes in her paintings over time:

by Andy SmithPosted on

“A Student’s Dream,” the central oil painting in Mario Moore‘s new show, is inspired by the artist’s recent surgery to remove a benign brain tumor. “Recovery” kicks off at David Klein Gallery in Detroit at the end of the month, and in the show, the artist looks at how African-American men experience recovery from hardship and trauma.