by Andy SmithPosted on

Holly Keogh’s oil paintings and collages simultaneously recreate and deconstruct the artist’s old family photographs and memories. Her “Synthetic Dreamers” series, in particular, implements distortion in a way that creates both intimacy and distance from the moments depicted in the work. The artist says that the concept of archiving—and the discernment involved—plays a vital role in her work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Korean-born, Nevada-based artist Amy Sol offers a new body of works at Thinkspace Gallery this month, under the title “Bird of Flux.” The painter’s whimsical, dreamlike works look at “themes of transition, adventure, and adaptation.” The show features both oil paintings and sculptures, which carry the soft textures and fantastical elements of the panel works to three dimensions.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Hansel’s painstakingly crafted oil and flashe paintings span periods of art history, remixing and interpreting in collage-like pieces. The blending of Renaissance and Lowbrow iconography is pushed further into surrealism with Hansel’s abstractions, which also defy the painter’s chosen tools, and his use of exposed linen. The artist, an MFA graduate of Yale, has been shown across the U.S. and in Tokyo, London, and beyond.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jean-Pierre Roy’s new body work evolves his stirring, rich paintings, which blend geometric abstraction and figurative scenes. Recent works will be shown at the VOLTA NY fair, running in New York City from March 7-11. Roy was the cover artist for Hi-Fructose Vol. 37. In a statement, the show says that Roy “will continue to place figures in an optically loaded environment, allowing for the entropic confusion of historical painting tropes, non-spaciotemporal geometry, and figurative drama to play out against an arid, dystopian landscape.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Angela Gram’s oil paintings are alive with explorations of the natural world injected with distorted, vibrant sensibility. “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark from Feb. 24 through the end of March, collects a new set of kinetic works. This new collection “The Past is Alive,” a show running at Gallery Poulsen in Denmark through “constant fascination with the monstrously surreal, expressed through her deconstructed animal kingdom.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Greene’s surreal oil paintings explore several aspects of the Western experience: politics, pop culture, our relationship to the natural world, and the history of art itself. The artist says that the meaning of each work remains elusive for even him until some time has passed with the work, often not working with a complete idea and instead building one idea onto another.