by Andy SmithPosted on

Boston-born, London-based painter Phil Hale crafts distressed, dynamic works in which figures are conveyed in action and anguish. His nighttime backdrops are particularly absorbing, with shadows both enveloping and dramatizing the scenes. Hale’s work is decidedly confrontational and relational, in contrast with figurative painting that focuses on quiet, somber moments. In fact, several of Hale’s paintings seem to be convergences of multiple scenes. Hale was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

New York City-based artist Daniel Bilodeau creates work that blends traditional still-life and figure studies with postmodern, existential displacement. These are works that feel as though once complete, were re-arranged by the hands of another creator. There are traces of traditional Dutch still-life in Bilodeau’s works, but there’s also a contemporary, graphical quality to the work, which in its dissonance, offers physical and psychological complexity.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Painter Pamela Wilson pushes her absorbing, eerie imagery with a mixture of oils and gold leaf, crafting shimmering images of isolated subjects. Wilson’s paintings stir in the often off-kilter expressions of her subjects and overall otherworldliness of the setting. Wilson is part of a new show at Australia’s beinArt Gallery. “Jamais Vu” pairs the artist’s work with Kit King and Oda, a husband and wife duo that collaborates on oil paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In conjunction with “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist’s paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

During her schooling at the Academy of Fine Arts in Warsaw, Polish painter Justyna Kisielewicz was forced to create monochromatic paintings. But after she graduated, she took things in a new direction. Much of her work, primarily her oil paintings, are lush explosions of pink and pop. Now, she’s been dubbed the “princess of pop culture” by Pangea Magazine, who says the artist’s intention is to “intention is to rip up the stereotypical image of the dour Polish artist.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

New York City-based artist Julie Heffernan crafts oil paintings on canvas that depict lush backdrops and occasionally, injects the artist herself into fantastical narratives and allegories. However, much of the recent work shown here pulls the camera back for a holistic view into fictional worlds. The artist last appeared on HiFructose.com here.