by Andy SmithPosted on


The billowed rugs and other objects in Antonio Santin’s ghostly oil paintings are rendered with unsettling realism. The Madrid native works in “elaborate still-lifes,” as he alters his subjects to create new realities. The artist taps into the tradition of Spanish Tenebrism and a sculptural background to dream up and execute these works on canvas. When photographed from a distance, the work still turns heads, with the viewer attempting to understand what he or she is seeing. He was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 18 and was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Patricia Traub’s oil paintings exist at the intersection of art and activism. These works attempt to humanize her animal subjects, in a way that showcases both their inherent beauty and rights to live in the world untortured. In her group portraits, in particular, she places animals and humans among each other in a way that emits harmony and equation of value.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hollis Dunlap, a Vermont-born artist, crafts portraits that blend painted realism and sculptural concepts and abstractions. These oil paintings can appear as distorted photographs, yet hidden within these textured backgrounds and surprising hues are several hidden decisions and possibilities. Hollis started painting when he was 14, studying strictly realism before developing this current style.

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John Jacobsmeyer’s oil paintings on aluminum recall nostalgic and imaginative experience, using wooden backdrops and technology-inspired shapes. These works at once feel aged and modern, and while humor runs throughout his recent works, several ring of sincerity and vulnerability. And a few others have skeleton warriors. Jacobsmeyer has cited Gene Roddenberry, Nietzsche, David Lynch, and Mary Shelley as influences.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Stuart Snoddy, a painter based in the Midwest, creates “fantasies and fictions about imaginary people.” His oil works on paper and on canvas move between the wistful and the contemplative. And while Snoddy plays with form and hues, each of the artist’s pieces are distinctly human.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Next month, painter Alex Gross returns with his first show in a decade in Los Angeles, where he lives and works. For most, “Antisocial Network” may conjure images of handheld devices and laptop screens, yet this show takes a broader approach to the term. Smartphones, VR headsets, corporate branding, and internal preoccupation all offer a different take on what the artist intends with this new collection at Corey Helford Gallery. The show kicks off Feb. 25 and lasts through March 25. Gross was last featured on HiFructose.com here.