by Andy SmithPosted on


The oil paintings of Dino Valls balance the bare vulnerability of his figures with surreal touches with deceptively elaborate embellishments, from the transforming compartments of his triptychs to constellation-bearing freckles. In some ways, the Spanish artist continues a thread and approach forged by European masters; elsewhere, his psychological additions feel contemporary. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The bold, dynamic oil paintings of French artist Cedrix Crespel use atypical perspective, a graphical approach, and abstractions. The subjects and backdrops recall the femme fatale of comic books and street art. In a statement, the artist offers insight into the ever-present female form in his works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sasha Gordon‘s vivid oil paintings feature touches of the surreal, exploring themes such as mental illness and sexuality. The artist, currently a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, has moved from intimate, realistic portraits to more conceptual, perspective shifting work recently. Works such as “I Left The Night The Dummy Crashed The Gordon’s Volvo” offer seemingly personal narratives with several elements to unpack.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In her manipulations of the face and artistic form, L.A. Bryson creates oil portraits that find humanity in distortion. Her paintings are at once elegant and chaotic in execution, her dedicated “wet-to-wait” process requiring singles sessions between 6 and 10 hours in duration. With her toying with the texture of oils, the artist is both a sculptor and a painter.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Hannah Yata‘s paintings explore both nature and the subconcious, with vivid, vibrant scenes. The work can feel both romantic and and allegorical, with a recent set of works embodying both in “Exile” at Phaneros Gallery in Nevada City, Calif. This body of work explores the story of Adam and Eve in a way true to Yata’s form. Yata was recently featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 45.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Claire Scherzinger builds worlds in her paintings, crafting alien ecosystems that offer metaphors of our own Western lives. The recent series “Exoplanet: Arca-45672,” in particular, has scenes with a distinct palette and lifeforms whose narratives beg to be deciphered. Works like “Baptism before the vacuum cloud storm” shows a ceremony both familiar and curious, rendered in oils and spraypaint.