by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Greene’s surreal oil paintings explore several aspects of the Western experience: politics, pop culture, our relationship to the natural world, and the history of art itself. The artist says that the meaning of each work remains elusive for even him until some time has passed with the work, often not working with a complete idea and instead building one idea onto another.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Jacobsmeyer’s plywood backdrops contain scenes that explore fantastical narratives, and lately, video game culture in particular. In his debut show at Jonathan Levine Projects, titled “Great Feats and Defeats,” continues a fascination with wood for the artist that reaches back to his childhood. The artist says that “rotary sawn pine plywood is cheap yet durable and along with being used as sub-flooring and fencing for construction sites. It’s also the material twelve-year-old children will use to build clubhouses in the woods where they’ll rule their own kingdoms, wage wars and rebuild bigger and wilder each time.” Jacobsmeyer was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Masakatsu Sashie, an artist known for distinctive, hovering orbs exploring industrialization and philosophical themes, brings new works to KP Projects in Los Angeles with “Kaleidoscope.” The show “explores the phenomenon of artificial creation and man-made environments,” a statement says. In particular, this works looks at the current age as the height of artificial creation. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The oil paintings of Kei Imazu appear as a convergence of art history and cultures, surreal collisions reminiscent of a digital glitch. Her works begin as collages, sourced from the Internet or analog media, before being even further recontextualized as a singular painting. The result is something that feels separate from any one era, wholly fresh yet familiar.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Gregory Jacobsen’s unsettling, vivid oil paintings offer portraits, scenes, and bizarre explorations of the most unflattering aspects of our anatomy. The Chicago-based artist sometimes abandon the figurative, instead offering a vague, writhing mash-up of organic materials. All are rooted in the artist’s fixations and sense of humor.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Laura Buss creates stirring oil paintings with subjects that appear to moving through planes of reality. The San Francisco-based artist renders both scenes and intimate studies that carry introspective themes. Buss had a recent show of her paintings at Modern Eden Gallery.