by Andy SmithPosted on

Hula is the moniker of artist Sean Yoro, who creates massive, delicate murals above waterways and alongside abandoned structures. The self-taught painter was raised in Oahu, where he engaged with the ocean as a surfer before embarking on a path in street art and tattooing. Today, he creates his massive figures in oil paint and creates pieces across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Koralie creates vibrant, absorbing wall art and works on canvas that combine influences from both traditional and contemporary Japanese art, African and English history, and even wallpaper design. Her works appear publicly and inside galleries across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Astro takes flat urban surfaces and creates passageways into the void. Using shadows and light, calligraphy-inspired designs and winding curves, the artist’s optical illusions are made for public consumption. And even when they’re not so obvious to some passers-by and cars on a quick route to work, Astro has many of us looking at the big picture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Miami’s Douglas Hoekzema, also known as Hoxxoh, creates murals that do more than absorb the gaze of the viewer. Nearby objects appear as though they can be pulled into the artist’s latest, hyperdimensional works. Hoekzema has long been fascinated with the concept and rendering of time in his art. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here (and check out his Instagram here).

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Rimon Guimarães is a young, Brazilian artist who has painted murals across the world, visiting locales such as the Netherlands, France, and Gambia to leave pieces of his work behind. Guimarães’ works typically feature mask-like characters and bright colors and patterns — perhaps an homage to the prevalence of African diasporic traditions in his native country. Indeed, the pieces he created in Gambia look right at home, juxtaposed with local women passing by in their exquisitely patterned dresses. His work exudes happiness and adds vibrance to any urban setting.