by Andy SmithPosted on

Vitaly Tsarenkov takes visual cues from 8-bit console games and early 3D animation yet crafts paintings on canvas, murals, and sculptures. The Russian artist transitioned from primarily graffiti work under the moniker SY to major gallery shows and crafting murals for festivals across the world. The artist’s works are held in private collections in France, Morocco, Russia, and beyond. The below works are acrylic paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Spanish artist Liqen somehow moves between the paper and the public wall without compromising his intricate, absorbing linework. His wild creations often carry surreal sensibilities and a hidden treasure in every corner. The artist’s work tends to be influenced by an early passion in nature, and in specific, the diversity of species and sights it provides.

by Andy SmithPosted on


John Horton; photo: @streetartnomad

The festival Wide Open Walls returned in Sacramento this month, and with it, came 40 local, national, and international artists who crafted murals across the city. This year’s artists included Askew One, Bryan Valenzuela, Jake Castro, Lora Zombie, Maren Conrad, Nosego, Molly-Devlin, Trav, Stephanie Taylor, and others. See some examples of works from this year above and below.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Case Maclaim is the moniker of German artist Andres Von Chrzanowski, a muralist known as a co-founder of the Maclaim Group, a troupe known for using spray paint to combine photorealism and surrealism on public walls. In particular, the artist is known as one to “embrace the power of movement through the universality of hands.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher Konecki’s vibrant paintings, sculptures, and murals distort and create surreal artifacts out of urban landscapes. This vibrant, yet somewhat bleak observations recall work from Jeff Gillette and Masakatsu Sashie. (Also, Josh Keyes, who was recently featured here on the blog, carried similar visual themes in his own early work.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Nicolas Barrome’s wild, cartoonish scenes play with texture and expectation. He does this both on the canvas and on walls, with each piece tethered by Barrome’s rendering of cutesy characters and objects alongside darker elements. In a statement, the artist’s swirling influences are given some context.