by Andy SmithPosted on


Dubbing themselves “professional spraycationers,” Yok & Sheryo inject pops of cartoon joy into everyday life. Their Fruit and Vegetables La-la land in Singapore is an explosive example of what happens when the pair can run wild, tapping both their inner-children and actual youth from the area to make the creations. Their work can also be seen on public walls across the world, and on Instagram—documenting their adventures under the moniker “spacecandy.” They were last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

French artist Astro takes flat urban surfaces and creates passageways into the void. Using shadows and light, calligraphy-inspired designs and winding curves, the artist’s optical illusions are made for public consumption. And even when they’re not so obvious to some passers-by and cars on a quick route to work, Astro has many of us looking at the big picture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Miami’s Douglas Hoekzema, also known as Hoxxoh, creates murals that do more than absorb the gaze of the viewer. Nearby objects appear as though they can be pulled into the artist’s latest, hyperdimensional works. Hoekzema has long been fascinated with the concept and rendering of time in his art. He was last featured on HiFructose.com here (and check out his Instagram here).

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Rimon Guimarães is a young, Brazilian artist who has painted murals across the world, visiting locales such as the Netherlands, France, and Gambia to leave pieces of his work behind. Guimarães’ works typically feature mask-like characters and bright colors and patterns — perhaps an homage to the prevalence of African diasporic traditions in his native country. Indeed, the pieces he created in Gambia look right at home, juxtaposed with local women passing by in their exquisitely patterned dresses. His work exudes happiness and adds vibrance to any urban setting.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A few weeks ago, we gave readers a small taste of the many, enormous murals that went up at We AArt Festival in Aalborg, Denmark (see our coverage of Aryz, Escif and Kenor’s walls here). The festival was envisioned as a way to bring more public art to the mid-sized city and featured international artists with a penchant for large-scale work that Hi-Fructose readers will recognize. Interesni Kazki, a duo from Ukraine known for their storybook-like murals, split up and tackled two separate walls. Puerto Rican artist Alexis Diaz typically draws inspiration from the natural world for his depictions of hybridized creatures. His piece for We AArt depicts a skeletal horse encased in an armor of tree branches with an ink-like technique atypical of outdoor work. Other artists included Jaz, Liqen, Don John and Fintan Magee. Check out photos of the murals below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While the collective mindset at some street art festivals seems to be “go big or go home,” at NuArt Festival in Stavanger, Norway, the line-up of artists seemed more concerned with creating deliberately-placed works with an underlying political punch. That’s not to say that a few mammoth pieces weren’t painted. Polish duo Etam Cru (who are featured in our current issue, Hi-Fructose Vol. 32), true to their form, left behind a storybook-like mural that added color to the overcast landscape. The piece pictured a sleeping boy tucked into his bed with a can of spray paint sticking out from under the covers — a young artist in the making.