by Andy SmithPosted on

Oscar Oiwa brings his immersie mural work to USC Pacific Asia Museum with the new installation “Dreams of a Sleeping World.” The artist describes this new work as a “360° dreamscape,” created over two weeks and handrawn with 120 Sharpie markers. Oiwa was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Barcelona-born muralist Saturno has a knack for the monstrous. The artist recently brought his lush and startling style to walls in London, Los Angeles, and recently, Miami, alongside the annual festivals nearby. His work blends pop culture with a more classical sense of refinement. (Top photo by Drone_Exelbierd.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kitt Bennett’s “aerial mural work” was recently combined with satellite technology to craft the world’s most massive independently created piece of “gif-iti” (or GIF-style graffiti) on 96,875-square-feet of waterfront space in Australia. The work, crafted by Bennett alongside collective Juddy Roller, features 10 figures that craft a “moving” scene when viewed as such below. Bennett was last featured on our site here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using sub-pixel techniques and additive color theory, Aches creates murals and portraits that reflect today’s digital world with analogue spraypaint and acrylics. The Irish artist, whose work has been seen in Spain, Denmark, England, Switzerland, the U.S., and beyond, applies this experimentation to large figurative works, gallery portraits, and traditional graffiti text.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ella & Pitr recently painted Europe’s biggest mural, beating their own record set a few years back. The rooftop piece, at 25,000 square meters, has been dubbed the “largest grandmother in the world.” The duo was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist PixelPancho is known for a fascination with robots, yet his massive murals go beyond contemplations on technology and into metaphysical territory. His work, found on walls across the world, offer an interconnected narrative from piece to piece, gradually unfolding the painter’s broad examination of what it means to be human.