by Andy SmithPosted on

David Fullarton, simply, makes “pictures with words on them.” Yet, despite that simple tagline adorning his site, examination of his mixed-media works yields much more than that. His figurative drawings not only reflect something deeply human; they also carry as much of weight of the humor in each work as the text. Fullarton can something that’s at once desperate, hilarious, pitiful, and somehow joyful.

by Andy SmithPosted on

At first glance, Nathaniel Mary Quinn‘s works may appear as collages. But the Chicago-raised artist’s stirring portraits are rendered in charcoal, oil-paint, paint-stick, gouache and oil pastel by his own hands, an alchemistic process that is both meticulous and intuitive. Much of his work pulls from his own experiences, composite memories that mix bright pop cultural references and the bleakness found in his subjects.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The vibrant work of Erik Jones takes an intimate step in a new series of images under the title “Armor” at Jonathan Levine Projects next month. The works mix acrylics, watercolor, pencil, water-soluble wax pastel, and other materials. Jones last appeared on the HiFructose.com here, and he crafted the cover for and appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 27.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s acrylic and mixed-media paintings move between mythology, abstraction, and contemporary narratives. With differing approaches, his vibrant works are inhabited by a variety of conversations and references to both classical and new approaches. The work also touches on street art, Edo Japanese tradition, and explorations of cultural identity. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

South Africa-born, Mexico-based painter Christiaan Conradie mixes abstraction and the figurative, injecting delicate realism, otherworldly forms, and sculptural elements into the canvas. Influences like Rembrandt, Twombly, and Rubens are part of an ongoing dialogue in Conradie’s work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Firelei Baez blends an array of techniques and materials to explore culture and femininity. Often using the figurative form as a base, she subverts the viewers’ expectations by implementing several textures, patterns, and materials. The artist says that her massive, meticulously crafted works on paper are “intrinsically indebted to a rigorous studio practice.” Baez was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.