by Margot BuermannPosted on


Gilles Cenazandotti is a French artist known for his arresting sculptures of animals constructed entirely of litter he collects from the ocean. Petroleum products, bottle caps, tubes of sunscreen, and other plastic refuse are gathered from the sea and transformed into a variety of species, many endangered. Through his art, Cenazandotti hopes to bring greater awareness to the condition of our planet and the number of species threatened by human activity and pollution.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Fred Tomaselli’s psychedelic painting/collage hybrids have mind-altering tendencies in more ways than one. Over his career, the artist has earned a reputation for blending psychotropic substances with cut-out photos of animals and human parts to create his surreal works of art. Newer pieces shift the focus to more conventional photo collage and acrylic, yet are no less mesmerizing. Colorful and imaginative, Tomaselli’s works are like portals to an alternate universe, where his “inquiry into utopia/dystopia – framed by artifice but motivated by the desire for the real – has turned out to be the primary subject”.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


When studying Anne Lemanski‘s sculptures, the artist’s choice in medium becomes just as intriguing as the subject depicted. Working from her extensive personal collection, the artist uses a variety of materials – from vinyl and book pages to textiles and vintage photos – to create life-size sculptures of animals and objects. While some pieces are more open to interpretation, others not-so-subtly address the social, political and environmental issues we face in modern times.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Michelle Dickson is an artist living in Baltimore who combines found materials with plaster, oil paint and wax to form her surreal sculptures. For her ongoing series Neither Mine Nor Yours, the artist merged plaster casts of her own face with driftwood she collected on her various hikes throughout the Washington, D.C. and Baltimore areas. The self portraits take an introspective approach to exploring identity and place in an uncertain world, as well as the impact that time has on our memories, bodies and relationships.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Chapel Hill artist Antoine Williams, a.k.a. Raw, explores issues surrounding race and class through mixed-media installations, paintings, drawings, and collage. His work is semi-autobiographical, inspired by his experiences of a rural working class upbringing in Red Springs, North Carolina. “My art practice is an investigation of my cultural identity through the exploration of societal signs as they relate to institutional inequities,” Williams explains in his artist statement. View more of his work on his Instagram and Tumblr.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Vanna Bowles is a visual artist who creates sculptures, drawings, and installations with people and nature as her central subjects. The artist is fond of combining her pencil work with mixed media to create a three-dimensional, illusory effect, with pieces extending from the surface of her canvas and into the viewer’s surrounding space. Bowles has exhibited her work at the Lars Bohman Gallery in Stockholm, Malmö Art Museum and the Stenersen Museum in Oslo.