by Andy SmithPosted on

Photographer Henrik Isaksson Garnell “sculpts” his imagery with natural elements such as bones and plant matter, manmade objects, digital effects, and electronic ephemera. The result includes his new series “In Treatment,” a meditation on psychotherapy. The work moves between the cerebral and the surreal.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Examining the theme of survival, the floral figures of Sage Vaughn‘s recent body of work carry elegance and provocation. Recent work shown at Unit London, rendered in acrylic, ink, oil, and vellum on canvas, show an artist reflecting on the power and harshness of nature. Vaughn was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 26.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Slinkachu

In their current show “Trash Talk” at Thinkspace Projects, interventionists Jaune and Slinkachu offer new solo pieces and collaborative works. Jaune, last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, is known for his tiny, stenciled sanitation workers that toy with scale and humor throughout city streets. Slinkachu (last featured here) uses everyday objects as vessels for his own small characters in unexpected dioramas. This show runs through June 22 at the space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The acrylic and mixed-media paintings of Hernan Bas carry a coming-of-age quality, pulling from varying periods. His influences, among several other mediums, have a particular consideration of “the Aesthetic and Decadent writers of the 19th century, in particular Oscar Wilde, Charles Baudelaire and Joris-Karl Huysman,” a statement says. Film, poetry, and art history itself also have an impact on his contemplative works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul McCarthy’s work traverses sculpture, painting, installation art, and film, and all are showcased in his new show, aptly titled “Mixed Bag.” The show at Xavier Hufkens in Belgium, running through May 25 at the venue, takes over both of their gallery spaces. From his malformed figures to recent political reflections in video, the 73-year-old’s work from the past two decades is shown.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cesar Piette’s analogue paintings carry the texture and sheen of digitally created Pixar characters. The artist uses a blend of paint techniques, between traditional layering and airbrush approaches. Before that, the artist has first designed these characters via sketching, digital modeling and adjustment, and then goes to work on the final painting.