by Andy SmithPosted on

Though Alex Kuno’s current work is still brimming with fairytale imagery and carries both a grim and satirical mythology, these new mixed-media pieces offer a decidedly frenzied, more toiled spin. These works take the familiar children and beasts and expose their innards, a blend of seemingly floral and unsettling organic matter. With Kuno’s playful vibrancy, each exposed being is more absorbing than repelling. Kuno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Edwin Ushiro, a Hawaii native currently based in California, constructs lively, vibrant scenes that often depict youths in adventure (and misadventure), offering escape during the winter months for those yearning for summer sights of yesterday. The artist, who works in the film industry as a storyboard artist, production designer, visual consultant, and concept designer, carries a cinematic, dreamlike vibe through many of these scenes. With one parent from Maui and the other a native of Japan, the artist has said they he sees both cultures as an influence. Ushiro was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


“Ouroboros” by Lana Crooks

In All that Remains, the new exhibition at Stranger Factory, a diverse group of artists offer their own interpretations of the phrase, “What remains when all is said and done?” Curated by Lana Crooks (who also appears in the exhibition), the group show runs October 7-31, 2016. Participating artists include Adipocere, Jeremy Bastian, Jessica Dalva, Kristina Drake, Matt Hall, Stephanie Inagaki, Darla Jackson, Jessica Joslin, Jennifer Joslin, Mahlimae, Lauren Marx, Caitlin McCormick, Stephanie Metz, Christina Mrozik, Forest Rogers, Virginie Ropars, Sinan Soykut, Tyler Thrasher, Jake Waldron, and Katherine Walsh (FearsomeBeast). View more photos from All that Remains behind the cut.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Marlène Mocquet is a French artist whose chimerical paintings and sculptures portray strange worlds full of quirky, animated characters. Her surreal creations often have a sense of childlike whimsy and humor; other times, they turn dark and tumultuous, and verging on grotesque.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Australian artist Kate Shaw combines “paint pours”, collage, glitters and inks to render psychedelic landscapes. The colorful images yield awe-inspiring effects, yet are accompanied with a dark undertone. While they may capture the “transcendent beauty” of nature, at the same time they hint at the troubling environmental changes brought on by human activity.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


San Francisco-based visual artist Nicholas Bohac contemplates “the big picture” in his immersive, mixed media works that feature celestial figures amidst dreamlike landscapes. In his artist statement, Bohac writes that his purpose is “to question the universe and where, exactly, people fit into it… Through my work, I aim to explore the overall phenomenon of what it means to be human, past, present and future.”