by Andy SmithPosted on

Paul McCarthy’s work traverses sculpture, painting, installation art, and film, and all are showcased in his new show, aptly titled “Mixed Bag.” The show at Xavier Hufkens in Belgium, running through May 25 at the venue, takes over both of their gallery spaces. From his malformed figures to recent political reflections in video, the 73-year-old’s work from the past two decades is shown.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Cesar Piette’s analogue paintings carry the texture and sheen of digitally created Pixar characters. The artist uses a blend of paint techniques, between traditional layering and airbrush approaches. Before that, the artist has first designed these characters via sketching, digital modeling and adjustment, and then goes to work on the final painting.

by Andy SmithPosted on

David Altmejd‘s mindbending sculptures return in a new show at White Cube Hong Kong. In “The Vibrating Man,” running through May 18, the artist offers his transforming figures and busts, each its on unsettling, yet absorbing mutation. Instead of any given piece having its own meaning, the artist has said he prefer “it to be able to generate its own meaning.” Altmejd was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nathaniel Mary Quinn’s affecting mixed-media portraits recently returned in the show “Always Felt, Rarely Seen” at Almine Rech in Brussels. As with past work (Quinn was last featured on HiFructose.com here), there’s a collage-like look to the work, though all aspects are sourced through materials at the artist’s hands. Yet, as the gallery says, there’s been a more personal evolution in recent work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Exploring the reality of “distorted or inaccessible memories,” Eliana Marinari applies several layers of aerosol acrylic paint over ink and pastel drawings. In the artist’s “Recognition Memory” and “Recollection” series, portraits and still-life works are given this treatment, respectively. The resulting work is both haunting and brings reflection on our own limitations, as viewers.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show, two decades of work from the Australian illustrator-painter Shaun Tan are offered, spanning both his child-oriented characters and more mature narratives. “Untold Tales,” kicking off at Beinart Gallery on March 9 and running through the end of the month. Tan’s survey includes oil paintings, colored pencil and pen, pastel, and more.