by Andy SmithPosted on

In conjunction with “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose” at Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, painter Martin Wittfooth visits for a talk and Q&A on Thursday, Nov. 10. The narratives of the artist’s paintings focus on animals, offering allegorical and dystopian tales of a post-human world. The artist created the cover for Hi-Fructose Volume 35. The talk, kicking off at 6:30 p.m., is free for museum members and $5 for non-members. Get more info here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


New York artist Martin Wittfooth continues to explore the relationship between the contemporary experience and nature with a new show at Corey Helford Gallery titled “The Archaic Revival,” which runs through Oct. 29 at the space. The title of the show comes from ethnobotanist and philosopher Terence McKenna, who held a theory that society was reverting back to archaic values and norms in order to heal itself from a modern, poisonous condition. The artist, a Toronto native, is currently based in Brooklyn.

by CaroPosted on

Stephen Romano Gallery in Brooklyn has assembled a rather eerie exhibition in cooperation with Morbid Anatomy Museum that pairs contemporary works with a wide variety of vernacular photography, folk sculpture, spirit photography, and more. “OPUS HYPNAGOGIA: Sacred Spaces of the Visionary and Vernacular” takes a look at creative enlightenment over the centuries, and explores our ongoing fascination with mental phenomena like Hypnagogia. On display will be recent works by the likes of Martin Wittfooth (HF Vol. 19 cover artist), Kris Kuksi (first covered in HF Vol. 19), Caitlin McCormack, El Gato Chimney, Rithika Merchant, and Hunter Stabler whose creations share a surreal quality or supernatural theme.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on


Martin Wittfooth

An esoteric concept that fascinated the first Surrealists, an “égrégore” is a sort of mob mentality. Scholar Pierre Mabille defined it as “a group of humans endowed with a personality different from that of the individuals forming it.” This concept of collective consciousness was the springboard for Yves Laroche Gallery’s eponymous exhibition, the gallery’s largest group show to date. With dozens of artists, many of whom are associated with the Pop Surrealist movement, the show builds its momentum from the multitudes of distinct yet complementary aesthetics joined together. Among the line-up are names that will be well-known to our readers: Josh Agle (Shag), Martin Wittfooth, Amy Sol, Joe Sorren, Liz McGrath, Annie Owens (Hi-Fructose co-editor-in-chief), AJ Fosik, Miss Van and many others. Take a look at our sneak peek below before “Égrégore” opens on October 30 at Yves Laroche Gallery in Montreal.