by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Vincent Xeus’s shadowy portraits reference the Italian and Dutch masters. But rather than directly emulating the techniques of Caravaggio and Rembrandt, he builds on their styles to create works with a moody, haunted ambiance. He scratches and smudges his anachronistic portraits with his paintbrush, making them appear broken and somehow corrupt. His subjects’ faces become ghostly and unrecognizable — their images, relics of an opulent society with a dark underbelly. Xeus’s new work is currently on view in his solo show, “Love — Fragmented Traditions,” showing through February 14 at Last Rites Gallery in New York.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Two solo exhibitions currently on view at Last Rites Gallery in New York, Kelley Hensing’s “The Animal Within” and N.C. Winters’s “Overgrowth” examine humankind’s darker impulses through folkloric visuals and occult imagery. Winters’s sculptural paintings with hand-crafted float frames depict characters undergoing processes of decay, their faces being consumed by plants and fungi. The artist explores the idea of being overtaken by nature as a metaphor for the voraciousness of an untamed, unruly mind.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Painter Kelley Hensing creates surreal, narrative works with an antiquated feel. Her portraits of anachronistic characters — Victorian ladies, wood nymphs, carnival workers — are placed in ornate, wooden frames that add to their timeworn aesthetic. Hensing is getting ready to debut her latest body of work for her solo show, “The Animal Within,” at Last Rites Gallery in New York.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A New York City art space with a penchant for the macabre, Last Rites Gallery currently has its annual group show, “The 13th Hour,” on view just in time for Halloween. The show features artists who have come to be associated with Last Rites — Dan Quintana, Naoto Hattori, David Stoupakis, menton3, Paul Booth — as well as many unexpected participants like Hannah Yata, Nicomi Nix Turner, Brin Levinson and Jean Labourdette. However, these are just a few examples of the show’s wide-ranging roster. Take a look at some highlights from the exhibition below and check out the show through November 15.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at New York City’s Last Rites Gallery, Donato Giancola and Fred Harper’s respective solo shows take viewers into strange worlds influenced by science fiction and fantasy. Donato Giancola’s “Silent Tragedies” is a rich series of oil paintings set in a distant realm where mechanical meets Medieval. Painting with a filmmaker’s eye, he depicts his protagonists in pivotal moments of their adventures. Fred Harper’s show “Virus Like Us” takes viewers into a megalopolis where biomorphic shapes become architectural structures (H.R. Giger appears to be a big influence). Harper attributes his interest in strange cityscapes to the culture shock he experienced when coming to New York from a small Pennsylvania town. Both shows are on view through October 4, so check them out while you still can.

by Soojin ChangPosted on

Last Rites Gallery in New York City opened two solo shows — Richard J. Oliver’s “Elements” and Stefano Alcantara’s “Waqayñan,” two concurrent interpretations of a journey — this past Saturday. Oliver’s works, which sprawled across the longest of the gallery’s walls, mark a personal evolution of the artist’s practice, specifically, as a departure away from his former foreboding narrative paintings and closer to the ebullience that has come over him in recent years.