by CaroPosted on

Currently on view at Harbour City, Hong Kong is “Sky is the Limit”, a new sculpture and paintings by Tomokazu Matsuyama (Vol 24). Curated by LA based Lebasse Projects in collaboration with Harbour City’s Ocean Terminal and gallery, the event centers around Matsuyama’s largest outdoor sculpture of the same name. At 21.5 feet of stainless steel, it is also the largest ever installed in Harbour City, which has previously exhibited artists like KAWS, Yayoi Kusama, and Yue Minjun.

by CaroPosted on

Opening July 25th in collaboration with Tokyo’s Mizuma Art Gallery, Zane Bennett Contemporary Art brings us a show by emerging Japanese artists and legends alike. IMPACTS! takes a look at work created between 2008 through today by names to put on your radar- Amano Yoshitaka, Ai Yamaguchi, Ishii Toru, Kaneno Tomiyuki, and Ishihara Nanami shown below. You may already be familiar with Ai Yamaguchi (featured here), and Amano Yoshitaka, famous for his designs for the Final Fantasy video games. Their works are filled with warring heroes, sirens and monsters drawn from mythology; some mix traditional Japanese folk tales with fantasy elements, while the new generation progressively exhibits Western influences.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Kenichi Yokono was on hand Saturday night for his opening of “The New Suburbs” at Mark Moore Gallery. Yokono’s show is a jarring vision of Japanese suburbia. Matched with Cheryl Pope’s reaction to violence in America, “Chain Reaction”, one could mistake Yokono’s pictures for a murder scene. True, it might look like spilled blood- but if you look closer, you’ll see its just last night’s dinner. Read more after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

The paintings of Japanese artist Maki Ohkojima explore our most precious possession as humans, our imagination. Imagination can be defined as making images that convey through shape, form, and emotion a reality. We are gifted with the ability to associate sounds and symbols and communicate these, think about new ideas and even crack the secrets of the universe. Ohkojima wants to paint what our bodies conceal. See more of her work after the jump.

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Japanese artist Kazuki Takamatsu (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 16) has a new solo show opening at CHG Circa on June 21st, “Spiral of Emotions”. The show’s title epitomizes the ghostly spiraling layers in Takamatsu’s handpainted figures that look like 3D graphics. He will exhibit twelve new gouache paintings exploring the emotional disconnect between the old and adolescent generations of Japan. These compositions may be precisely designed with a digital technique called Depth Mapping, but the final result captures feelings that cannot be planned. For his debut exhibition with Corey Helford last year, “Japanese Ideology of Puberty”, Takamatsu infused elements of Japanese pop culture and fantasy that are further employed here. His new subjects appear “lost” and floating through ethereal visions of death, spirituality, and an uncertain future. See more after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist 非 (meaning “Hi”) first caught our attention in 2012 with his mysterious tumblr of digital illustrations that look like oils. Hi’s portraits of young men, often depicted with a pained expression, are a unique blend of creepiness and happy colors. For writing purposes, we can only guess “his” gender, because Hi keeps his real name, sex and age a secret. Hi intentionally doesn’t sell his works nor does he exhibit in a gallery. What we do know is that Hi is a young artist representing the internet generation, millennials using it for creative tools, inspiration, and reaching audiences on a socially global level. Take a look at Hi’s new work after the jump.