by CaroPosted on

Tomokazu Matsuyama’s (Vol 24) third exhibition at Wendi Norris, which opens on March 12th, is a monument to some of art history’s most iconic subjects. The title “Come with me” represents the spirit of Matsuyama’s inspirations, powerful leaders spanning ancient Greek heroes, samurai, to Napoleon. Napoleon has been of particular interest to the artist of late, the subject of his “Sky is the Limit” installation at Harbour City Gallery, Hong Kong last year.

by CaroPosted on

It’s not manga. This is the starting point of a conversation that Yoshitomo Nara will host today about his debut solo exhibition in Hong Kong, “Life is Only One.” The show opened last night at the Asia Society, named after Nara’s painting “Life is Only One!”, featuring a child holding a skull as he contemplates life. In a recent interview, Nara shared, “When I was a child, the word “life” itself, of course, was a foreign concept. After turning 50, however, and with the deaths of people close to me and with the recent earthquake, I started to think about life more realistically – the limits of life, and the importance of what one can accomplish during that time.”

by CaroPosted on

Back in 2012, latex artist Saeborg (pronounced Cyborg) announced that his dream was to make an entire farm made of rubber. His current show at Tomonotsu Museum in Hirsoshima, Japan realizes that vision.  It was previously shown at Takashi Murakami’s Zingaro space in Nakano, a mecca for comics, toys and cosplay- Saeborg’s inspiration. 

by CaroPosted on

The materials of Atsuko Goto’s otherworldy paintings are as intriguing as her subject matter. Her pigments are made from semi-precious Lapis-lazuli and gum arabic, which helps her create her hazy, subdued palette. While decidedly dark, there is a softness in her portrayal of ethereal beauties, loosely based on Izanami-no-Mikoto or the goddess of creation and death.

by CaroPosted on

Yasuyo Fujibe’s softspoken, decorative works immediately caught our eye at LA Art Show last week. Her pieces there represented a departure from her older monochromatic paintings of faces in favor of new bolder elements. This would be her unique portrayal of doe-eyed girls in the arabesque style of Islamic art. Her use of surface decorations are based on the linear patterns of foliage and snowflakes, tiled repeatedly in a lace-like manner. Quiet yet intense, girls stare dreamily through their veils of interwoven lines.

by CaroPosted on

Tokyo based painter Yugo Kohrogi sees life through a unique filter. His exhibition “Ripple”, now on view at Cashi gallery in Tokyo, presents interpretations of the female form with a ripple effect. Kohrogi’s images undulate with an invisible energy that changes from piece to piece. Looking through broken glass or a watery surface might distort an image differently, and it’s these subtle differences that Kohrogi observes.