by James ScarboroughPosted on

Sarah A. Smith has a particular set of drawings that merit notice for their expressive qualities. Her subject is the natural world. The compositions are dynamic and fluid, coiled in mid-strike. If you didn’t know they were drawings, you might think they were dioramas. Subject matter includes eagles and wolves, trees and shrubs. Sometimes there’s a drawing of an eagle, sometimes there’s one of a wolf. Sometimes the two are locked in combat though, as in Eagle Vs. Wolf, you can only see the wolf responding to the eagle overhead. The work is dynamic. The shapes are sharp and angular. They look like lightning bolts. If you could rub the head of the eagle or the wolf, you’d feel its coarse texture. Likewise with the bark of the trees: rub it and you’d get splinters. The scenes offer voyeuristic views of the natural world in its rawest element. It’s a perilous, zero sum world. Its narrow color palette suggests bleakness.

by CaroPosted on

On Saturday at Mark Moore gallery, Rob and Christian Clayton aka Clayton Brothers brought together an expansive body of eclectic work, “Open to the Public” (previewed here). The exhibition includes everything from miniature drawing, painting, sculptures, interactive video and an installation that is like a twisted child’s playroom. The brothers credit their thrift shop “mecca”, the Sun Thrift Store in Sunland, CA as the visual inspiration.

by CaroPosted on

The photo-realistic works by British artist Juliette Losq (covered here) are like a portal to another world. Losq’s oil paintings and drawings on paper of forests are unique in her aggressive treatment of the medium. Her upcoming solo exhibition, “Nemora”, opening September 12th at the Fine Art Society Contemporary in London, focuses on this act of chaos in the wilderness. Her three new installations for the show are inspired by Rococo imagery and 18th-19th century Gothic architecture, visual styles influenced by faith, wealth and power.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Undocumented immigrants often describe feeling invisible in their new countries, as the significant parts of their day-to-day existence must be kept below the radar of those who can threaten their livelihoods. Colombian artist Rafael Gomezbarros touches upon this theme in his installation series “Casa Tomada,” in which giant sculptures of ants take over large, public spaces, confronting viewers with what they often overlook. “Casa Tomada” has previously appeared on the Colombian capitol building in Bogota and several art fairs in South America and the Caribbean. Its latest iteration is at Saatchi Gallery in London for their current exhibition, “Pangea: New Art from Africa and Latin America.”

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A dizzying array of laser-cut mirrors make up Miyazaki Saya and Shirane Masakazu’s dazzling “Wink Space” installation — a giant, walk-in kaleidoscope built inside of a shipping container. While the pair is not the first do a mirrored kaleidoscope installation, their piece stands out because of the complexity of its form. Dozens of mirrors were cut into triangular shapes to form the multifaceted, cave-like structure. Miyazaki and Shirane created the piece for last year’s Kobe Biennale, where artists were challenged to use shipping containers to create artworks that are mobile and, though site-specific, not confined to a geographical location.