by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

You might remember Maser from our coverage of Justkids’ “Life is Beautiful” festival in Las Vegas. There, the artist covered an entire motel with bold, diagonal stripes, turning the entire building and its parking lot into an Op Art-inspired installation. Maser is originally from Ireland, where he got his start (and nickname) from the graffiti scene in Dublin in the 1990s. Now based in the US, he still frequently works outdoors, though his style has morphed from traditional graffiti to expansive environments that he is able to achieve through the careful arrangement of just a few colors.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While some artists view yarn bombing as purely decorative, Olek (HF Vol. 29) often swathes objects in crochet to draw attention to important socio-political issues. Known for the outspoken messages in her large-scale, colorful work, she was recently invited to create a piece in New Delhi, India for the St+art Delhi street art festival. For her canvas, Olek chose one of the local homeless shelters called “Raine Basera,” which provide people with temporary lodging overnight. With the help of legions of volunteers and donations from Indian fashion labels, Olek beautified the shelter with bright yellow, purple, and red crocheted fabrics that evoke India’s famously vibrant textiles. Though it’s visually alluring, the piece ultimately imparts a sobering message about the reality of poverty in New Delhi — and many major cities around the world.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

If Pip and Pop’s colorful work looks good enough to eat, that’s because it is — sort of. The artist creates bright, crystalline installations using sugary candy, glitter, and cheap toys and knickknacks. These elements accumulate into mystical, glimmering environments filled with pastel-colored sand dunes, rainbow-hued rocks, and enchanted-looking flora. Based in Australia, Pip and Pop began as a duo comprised of Tanya Schultz and Nicole Andrijevic. In 2011, Andrijevic left to pursue other projects and Schultz has been the brains behind the operation since, often inviting guest artists to collaborate with her. Since we last featured Pip and Pop in 2012 (here), she has created confectionary paradises at various venues in the Netherlands, Japan, Taiwan, and Australia. Take a look at her recent work below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Os Gemeos started their year off with an installation that has become part of the permanent collection of Museu Casa do Pontal in Rio de Janeiro. The twin artists created a sculpture inside of a concrete, military-style bunker featuring one of their signature characters. They painted the walls of the structure with images of a crumbling city. While the imagery evokes Brazil’s growing poverty problem, Os Gemeos created the work as a response for the current state of Museu Casa do Pontal, an important folk art museum on which endless construction projects have encroached. The bunker, created in collaboration with Pascali Semerdjian Arquitetos, symbolizes a fortress protecting the museum’s art collection and legacy.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Using grid-like patterns that snake and spiral into organic shapes, Peter Kogler creates installations that make viewers feel like they just entered the matrix. Sometimes painted directly on the walls and sometimes in the form of projections, Kogler’s futuristic aesthetic transforms spaces into illusory environments with a disorienting effect. The artist has created his installations on the walls of galleries and museums all over Europe. In the photos documenting his pieces below, viewers become subsumed in patterns as they navigate Kogler’s altered spaces.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

For the upcoming group show “PROTEST” at M16 Art Space in Canberra, Australia, Fintan Magee created a video work based on an ephemeral installation he created in a Sydney warehouse. For the piece, Magee wanted to speak out against conservative bias in Australia’s news media, which he says spreads racism, homophobia, and Islamophobia. He created a wire sculpture and stuffed with with Daily Telegraph newspapers, a publication owned by ultra-rightwing media mogul Rupert Murdoch (who also owns Fox News here in the US). Magee set the sculpture in front of a mural and set it aflame. In a video included below, he explains that the man and dog in the mural represent the master-lapdog relationship between the media and its unquestioning followers. Titled “Man Bites Dog,” the multimedia piece will debut at M16 Art Space on March 26.