by Andy SmithPosted on

Rio de Janeiro native Ernesto Neto is often quoted as saying, “I am sculpture and think as sculpture.” Neto’s been exhibiting internationally since the 1990s, and the artist’s latest biomorphic work is a natural evolution of that oft-cited quote, tailored to the spaces each piece inhabits. From a distance, these new, vibrant installations appear as though they grew inside these walls organically. But Neto’s work isn’t meant to be enjoyed from afar.

by CaroPosted on

When French designer Emmanuelle Moureaux first arrived in Tokyo, she became fully fascinated by the colors overflowing on the street. She found that the city’s overwhelming number of store signs, flying electrical cables, and flashes of blue sky framed by various volumes of buildings created three dimensional “layers”. The flood of various colors that pervade the city streets are mirrored in her design installations, which build up a complex depth and intensity of space. These experiences of colors and layers are in the inspiration of Moureaux’s latest project, “bunshi” (meaning “ramification”), which means to divide or spread out into branches- a rainbow-colored suspended forest made on 20,000 pieces of paper shaped like twigs in 100 shades of color.

by CaroPosted on

Diana Al-Hadid once described her work as “impossible architecture”, created by embracing her gut instinct and seeing where it takes her. The Brooklyn based, Syrian born artist’s work can be difficult to describe, monumental and ethereal mixed media works with a myriad of references throughout art history: her captivating installations, sculptures and paintings feature elements of figures from the Renaissance and classical imagery, forms that appear to be disintegrating into a “dripping” tower.

by Abby Lynn KlinkenbergPosted on

Known for his provocative installations that bend both reality and perception, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson (previously featured on Hi-Fructose) aims to emphasize the relativity of reality. In his latest of many ambitious projects, he situates his works in the stunning baroque space of the Viennese Winter Palace of Prince Eugene of Savoy in an aptly titled exhibition, “Baroque Baroque”. While the relationship between his contemporary work and the extravagant exhibition space might not be clear at first, it comes into focus as both the art and its setting reflect a “prolific process of constant reformulation.” The double title emphasizes how the exhibition is a reformulation of a reformulation- a space of altered expectations and aesthetics.

by CaroPosted on

Though multimedia artist Carlito Dalceggio hails from Canada, he finds himself incorporating a world view into his work- colorful and frenzied compositions inspired by tribal art motifs, and master painters like Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani and Vincent Van Gogh. His spiritual and symbolic images of things like kites, peacock feathers and masks also recall Mexican popular art, Picasso’s cubism, Rauschenberg’s abstract expressionism, and Matisse’s primitivism.

by CaroPosted on

First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 12, and soon our “Turn The Page: The First Ten Tears of Hi-Fructose” retrospective at Virginia MOCA, Scott Hove is an unforgettable name for his decadent, yet nightmarish “Cakeland” series that includes snarling ‘taxidermied’ cakes and elaborate installations. But his works are more than just a sweet experience. Hove’s use of dualistic imagery in the cakes’ fangs, horns and switchblades are there to add psychological depth and force the viewer to choose how to integrate the dark elements into the lightness of the cake. For years, the Los Angeles based artist’s primary goal has been to make the experience as “satisfying” as possible, which makes his latest project all the more savory.