by Andy SmithPosted on

Mark Dean Veca, one of the featured artists in “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” created a new installation for the exhibition’s final stop at Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento. The absorbing, surreal “Maddest Hatter” greets visitors straight out of the elevator at the museum. In an Instagram video, the artist guides viewers through the completed installation.

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Artist Nick Cave, known for his famed “Sound Suits,” currently has taken over MASS MoCA with his massive installation “Until.” Just the numbers involved are astounding: more than 10 miles of crystals, 25 chandeliers, a crocodile, 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys, 13 gilded pigs, 16,000 wind spinners, millions of beads, and additionally, thousands of ceramics objects (animals and fruits, mostly). Yet, assembled, the piece tackles bigger questions than its contents would make viewers assume.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Italian artist Lorenzo Quinn unveiled a new sculpture at Ca’ Sagredo Hotel during this year’s Venice Biennale. “Support,” an enormous sculptural installation that appears to emerge out of the Grand Canal, appears as enormous, white hands. The work aims to display how humans have the ability and opportunity to “change and re-balance the world around them.” In particular, the hands are commenting on the urgency of climate change.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Do Ho Suh’s installations and works on paper use silk and thread to create architectural wonders. Other times, his site-specific work has included entire houses, built, slanted, and placed in odd places to explore the concept of space and home.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Carson Davis Brown’s “Mass” project puts site-specific, color-based installations in big box stores and other “places of mass” without permission. These visual disruptions take otherwise disparate objects and groups them into temporary sculptures. The project has taken the artist to stores across the U.S. A primary charge for the project is to make passers-by more aware of their environment by recontextualizing the items around them.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chun Sung-Myung creates surreal, figurative installations full of sculpted characters often having the artist’s own face. These dreamlike situations move between distress, somberness, and a broader vulnerability. The characters, representing part of the artist’s own psyche, often exist in modes of solitude or surrounded by otherworldly creations.