by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In Norwegian artist Per Kristian Nygård’s most recent installation, “Not Red But Green,” a lush, hilly lawn spilled out of NoPlace in Oslo. Its manicured grass resembled a scene from a well-kept park, not a gallery, effectively conflating the boundaries between indoors and outdoors. Nygård’s work is conceptual and cryptic. He describes the inspiration for “Not Red But Green” coming from a fever dream he experienced during a bout of the flu. In his vision, he discovered a lump on his body and imagined himself traversing a crater of flesh and a forest of hair. The hills in the installation came from this personal nightmare, but regardless of their backstory, they create a disorienting viewing experience that asks one to question the ways we commodify natural phenomena for human consumption.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Artist duo Nonotak (composed of Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) creates spellbinding audio-visual installations using simple arrangements of light reflections. As viewers step up to gaze within the large panes of glass at the facade of the structure, they encounter a seemingly endless vortex that appears to reach into a world beyond. Combined with Nonotak’s audio compositions, their high-intensity visuals transform the mundane spaces they inhabit into something more otherworldly. We previously featured their installation “DAYDREAM V.2″ on the blog and today we bring you the latest work in the series, “DAYDREAM V.4,” which was shown at MU in Eindhoven, Netherlands earlier this month.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Nicola Yeoman creates cryptic installations by altering and rearranging mundane objects. Often installed in abandoned buildings or outdoors, her ephemeral works live on in the form of photographs that become works of art in their own right. Many of Yeoman’s pieces explore typography. In one, she piled and hung wooden chairs in two sections of a room. Viewed from a specific angle, the chaotic arrangement of furniture forms the letter “D” with its negative space.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Alex Chinneck is frequently praised as an architectural wizard for his unusual interventions, which he creates with the help of engineering experts and legions of volunteers. In 2013, he transformed a multi-story home in Margate, UK into a steep slope that resembled a skate ramp (see our coverage here). Earlier this year, he made Covent Garden’s Market Building levitate, creating the illusion of the 184-year-old edifice floating off its foundation. For his most recent work, Chinneck built a brick house made entirely out of realistic, wax parts for London’s Merge Festival. The piece, titled “A Pound of flesh for 50p,” was put up in early October and left to endure the elements. Over the course of the past few weeks, the house has perplexed passersby as it melted and collapsed. Chinneck recently tweeted a photo of the house in its current state. Take a look at the melting house’s progress below.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Little is known about Japanese artist trio three. The young, anonymous artist collective utilizes toys and other childhood ephemera to create provocative installations and sculptures. Action figures and rubber figurines are melted into fleshy masses. The artists create complex, geometric forms out of the liquified toys, forming them into patters that alternate distinguishable characters’ faces and anonymous, tan blobs where limbs and bodies used to be. Micro elements accumulate into overwhelming conglomerations that challenge the viewer’s eye to distinguish their many details.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Belgian-born, Stockholm-based artist Carsten Höller creates interactive installations that reimagine the functionalities of commonplace objects and spaces. His recent piece for Gagosian Gallery at Frieze New York invited viewers to enter an Alice in Wonderland-inspired room where gigantic, textured mushroom sculptures hung over their heads.