by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Chicken wire and shredded dollar store table cloths are all Crystal Wagner sees over the multiple days it takes her to weave and sculpt one of her signature installations. Her work mimics organic shapes found in nature but betrays its artificiality with its fluorescent color schemes. Wagner recently debuted her latest installation, “Elasticity,” on view through February 6 at Bagwell Art Gallery at the Pellissippi State Community College campus in Knoxville, Tennessee. Made from the aforementioned materials, the colorful piece dominates the exhibition space and is one of Wagner’s most elaborate works to date.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

David Spriggs uses a combinations of acrylic paint and transparent plastic sheets to create sculptural installations with images floating within them. Spriggs divides his abstract designs into layers and paints them one by one until they accumulate into an illusory final product. His work focuses on radiating patterns that evoke various cosmic phenomena. With his strategic use of lighting, the nebulas come to life and appear to levitate before the viewer.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Spanish artist Pablo Valbuena alters viewers’ experiences with architecture with his projection-based installation art. Valbuena prefers to work in cavernous, abandoned spaces where he can use bright, white light to ephemerally draw on the walls. He typically arranges his projections to respond the existing architectural structure. As the geometric light projections in each piece shift, viewers’ relationship to the space changes.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates wooden installations inspired by the geometric arrangements of crystal formations. The artist stacks thin pieces of wood into tessellating triangular shapes, using them to create hive-like structures that viewers can enter. Fels’s installations are based on her elaborate blueprints, which she displays as artworks in their own right. The wood she uses is sourced from discarded construction materials. Functional and visually appealing, her works evoke makeshift shelters that viewers can temporarily inhabit.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

German artist Tobias Rehberger’s work is all about illusion. His installations transform rooms into Op Art-inspired, immersive environments that trick the eye. Criss-crossing, black and white patterns flatten the three-dimensional spaces, confusing his viewers’ sense of depth with busy patterns that continue from floor to ceiling. Rehberger’s sculptures are similarly entrancing with their bright colors and geometric forms. Though abstract at a first glance, many of his works cast shadows that form textual messages, adding another dimension of experience to the pieces.

by CaroPosted on

Last night, sculptor Daniel Arsham celebrated a return to his hometown of Miami with his installation, “Welcome to the Future” at Locust Projects. The project was successfully funded by Kickstarter and donations to create an original, site specific experience to Miami. Although an apocalyptic glimpse into our future, the piece is inspired by Arsham’s past- his survival of Hurricane Andrew in the 1990s.