by Andy SmithPosted on

Mario Mankey, a Valencia-born artist, creates large-scale installations and murals that feel at once comical and bleak. His recent installation at The Haus in Berlin, titled “Ego Erectus,” is indicative of this. The massive feet, which extend from the ceiling of the room, dwarf viewers and hint at an ever-present burden of humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Recently, the Captain Boomer Collective delivered an unexpected object just steps away from the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris: a beached whale. Well, it’s actually a fiberglass statue, though anyone approaching the accompanying “scientists,” life-like stench, and mass of the creature is in for an experience much like the real-life occurrence. The point is to offer both mystery and hint at the real-world problems of humans’ destruction of natural ecosystems.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether it’s a cleverly disguised speaker box or massive wall installation, Alex Yanes crafts vibrant characters and scenes out of seemingly disparate elements. The Miami-born artist says his inspiration comes from “vibrant fixtures of my environment, fatherhood, life’s circumstances, subcultures and the ability to create something out of nothing.” Often, his work is more functional than meets the eye.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Installation artist Michael Murphy is wowing with his work currently showing at the Wonderspaces pop-up event in San Diego. “Come Together,” an installation made of 2,200 descended parts, appears as a closed fist at certain angles. Murphy uses the phrase “Perceptual Art” to describe his works, which often contain meticulously crafted installations that depend on perspective.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mark Dean Veca, one of the featured artists in “Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose,” created a new installation for the exhibition’s final stop at Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento. The absorbing, surreal “Maddest Hatter” greets visitors straight out of the elevator at the museum. In an Instagram video, the artist guides viewers through the completed installation.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Nick Cave, known for his famed “Sound Suits,” currently has taken over MASS MoCA with his massive installation “Until.” Just the numbers involved are astounding: more than 10 miles of crystals, 25 chandeliers, a crocodile, 17 cast-iron lawn jockeys, 13 gilded pigs, 16,000 wind spinners, millions of beads, and additionally, thousands of ceramics objects (animals and fruits, mostly). Yet, assembled, the piece tackles bigger questions than its contents would make viewers assume.