by Andy SmithPosted on

Jo Cope, a conceptual fashion designer, mixes fine art and fashion. The artist intends to create pieces that are “hybrid installations that are perhaps only possible in a gallery but that nonetheless create a wearable garment and suggest alternative futures for fashion design.” Due to this blending of fields, her work has appeared in design stores, boutiques, and galleries across the world.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sculptor Katie Grinnan first unveiled the sculpture “Mirage” in 2011, offering an exploration of movement and space. Constructed from friendly plastic, sand, and enamel, the piece first debuted as part of an exhibition at Brennan & Griffin. The piece is actually a cast of Grinnan’s own body, set in various poses during a yoga routine. The work also calls back to Hindu art, in which gods display several limbs and omnipresence.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kate MccGwire’s anthropomorphic pieces exude a naturally sourced beauty as they writhe and loom in place. Much of her sculptural and installation work uses materials from the animal world, like pheasant and crow feathers, to create something new entirely. The British sculptor uses a dozen verbs to describe what she does: “I gather, collate, re-use, layer, peel, burn, reveal, locate, question, duplicate, play and photograph.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Tacit Contemporary Art in Melbourne, Australia, artist Irene Wellm crafts a fairytale in a paper collage installation titled “Mundus Imaginalis.” Painted with gouache, the surreal images resemble paper dolls of mythological characters. The artist said she was inspired by the narratives of the Grimm Brothers in creating the works, which start as digital collage and are then scaled and painted in monochrome. The exhibit runs through Dec. 18 at the gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lyndal Osborne, a native of Australia now based in Canada, has long explored nature and issues surrounding the environment in her work. More recent installations, like “Curtain of Life”, specifically react to the issue of genetically modified organisms. Or as the Vernon Public Art Gallery, which hosts these works, phrases it: “The objective of this exhibition is to address the issues of (GMOs) and their impact on traditional food growers, especially in the Okanagan Valley region with its extensive fruit and vegetable production.”
(photo credit: Josh Palmer)

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s no surprise that Saudi Arabia-born, Arizona-based artist/teacher Nathaniel Lewis was once a toy designer. Yet, although some of his newer sculptures have the bright, primary color schemes and wooden textures of old-school toys for children, the themes of series like “Little Terrors” are decidedly more complex. Depicting a TSA line, with workers, equipment, and explosives, Lewis confronts a common source of tension, anxiety, and frustration for adults.