by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Serra Victoria Bothwell Fels creates wooden installations inspired by the geometric arrangements of crystal formations. The artist stacks thin pieces of wood into tessellating triangular shapes, using them to create hive-like structures that viewers can enter. Fels’s installations are based on her elaborate blueprints, which she displays as artworks in their own right. The wood she uses is sourced from discarded construction materials. Functional and visually appealing, her works evoke makeshift shelters that viewers can temporarily inhabit.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

German artist Tobias Rehberger’s work is all about illusion. His installations transform rooms into Op Art-inspired, immersive environments that trick the eye. Criss-crossing, black and white patterns flatten the three-dimensional spaces, confusing his viewers’ sense of depth with busy patterns that continue from floor to ceiling. Rehberger’s sculptures are similarly entrancing with their bright colors and geometric forms. Though abstract at a first glance, many of his works cast shadows that form textual messages, adding another dimension of experience to the pieces.

by CaroPosted on

Last night, sculptor Daniel Arsham celebrated a return to his hometown of Miami with his installation, “Welcome to the Future” at Locust Projects. The project was successfully funded by Kickstarter and donations to create an original, site specific experience to Miami. Although an apocalyptic glimpse into our future, the piece is inspired by Arsham’s past- his survival of Hurricane Andrew in the 1990s.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Madiha Siraj creates intensely colorful installations that overstimulate the senses. Through the accumulation of cheap, commonplace materials, her works become veritable visual spectacles. “Oyster EB-124,” for instance, invited viewers to enter a room lined floor-to-ceiling with rainbow paint swatches that form pixelated-looking patterns. The patterns become disrupted at certain points in the room where the paint swatches’ shapes lose their regularity.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In Norwegian artist Per Kristian Nygård’s most recent installation, “Not Red But Green,” a lush, hilly lawn spilled out of NoPlace in Oslo. Its manicured grass resembled a scene from a well-kept park, not a gallery, effectively conflating the boundaries between indoors and outdoors. Nygård’s work is conceptual and cryptic. He describes the inspiration for “Not Red But Green” coming from a fever dream he experienced during a bout of the flu. In his vision, he discovered a lump on his body and imagined himself traversing a crater of flesh and a forest of hair. The hills in the installation came from this personal nightmare, but regardless of their backstory, they create a disorienting viewing experience that asks one to question the ways we commodify natural phenomena for human consumption.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Artist duo Nonotak (composed of Noemi Schipfer and Takami Nakamoto) creates spellbinding audio-visual installations using simple arrangements of light reflections. As viewers step up to gaze within the large panes of glass at the facade of the structure, they encounter a seemingly endless vortex that appears to reach into a world beyond. Combined with Nonotak’s audio compositions, their high-intensity visuals transform the mundane spaces they inhabit into something more otherworldly. We previously featured their installation “DAYDREAM V.2″ on the blog and today we bring you the latest work in the series, “DAYDREAM V.4,” which was shown at MU in Eindhoven, Netherlands earlier this month.