by Andy SmithPosted on

Crystal Wagner’s otherworldly installations are both spellbinding and unsettling. The works resemble something organic, yet are constructed from paper, wire, wood, paint, sealant, and other materials. Her recent pieces are part of the new show “Dimensions of Three” at Allouche Gallery in New York City, along with Martin Gremse and Reinoud Oudshoorn. The show starts Nov. 30 and runs through Dec. 31. The artist was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 41, and she last appeared on our website here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Edoardo Tresoldi’s wire mesh installations appear as apparitions in spaces across the world. His figures, in particular, are both enticing and eerie. The artist, who was raised in Milan, studied under painter Mario Straforini before embarking on a career in Rome.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist and designer Daniel Arsham currently has his first show in Russia at Moscow with “Moving Architecture” at VHDNKh. His nine site-specific “architectural interventions” bring surreal, three-dimensional touches to otherwise nondescript spaces. The photographs showing Arsham’s work in this piece were taken by James Law. Arsham was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Hove has a new two-part show with KP Projects in Los Angeles, implementing both locations of the gallery. The first, debuting Sept. 1, is a “an immersive Pentagon Cake Infinity Chamber” at the gallery’s Chinatown pop-up. The other is a multimedia art showcase at the La Brea location, with complete with an altar-like bed with sant fuchsia sheets and artificial flowers styled in Hove’s typical blend of horror and deliciousness. “Last Ticket to the Beauty Train” is the title of the shows. Hove appears in “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose,” current running at the Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher Konecki’s vibrant paintings, sculptures, and murals distort and create surreal artifacts out of urban landscapes. This vibrant, yet somewhat bleak observations recall work from Jeff Gillette and Masakatsu Sashie. (Also, Josh Keyes, who was recently featured here on the blog, carried similar visual themes in his own early work.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Janaina Mello Landini’s work may appear as representations of the circulatory system of the human body or roots from the natural world. But in truth, Landini’s work is created from unbraided rope, meticulously twisted and arranged and emblematic of a number of concepts. Zipper Galeria says that she combines her knowledge of “architecture, physics and mathematics” to creature each work.