by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott Hove has a new two-part show with KP Projects in Los Angeles, implementing both locations of the gallery. The first, debuting Sept. 1, is a “an immersive Pentagon Cake Infinity Chamber” at the gallery’s Chinatown pop-up. The other is a multimedia art showcase at the La Brea location, with complete with an altar-like bed with sant fuchsia sheets and artificial flowers styled in Hove’s typical blend of horror and deliciousness. “Last Ticket to the Beauty Train” is the title of the shows. Hove appears in “Turn the Page: The First 10 Years of Hi-Fructose,” current running at the Crocker Art Museum.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher Konecki’s vibrant paintings, sculptures, and murals distort and create surreal artifacts out of urban landscapes. This vibrant, yet somewhat bleak observations recall work from Jeff Gillette and Masakatsu Sashie. (Also, Josh Keyes, who was recently featured here on the blog, carried similar visual themes in his own early work.)

by Andy SmithPosted on

Janaina Mello Landini’s work may appear as representations of the circulatory system of the human body or roots from the natural world. But in truth, Landini’s work is created from unbraided rope, meticulously twisted and arranged and emblematic of a number of concepts. Zipper Galeria says that she combines her knowledge of “architecture, physics and mathematics” to creature each work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Mario Mankey, a Valencia-born artist, creates large-scale installations and murals that feel at once comical and bleak. His recent installation at The Haus in Berlin, titled “Ego Erectus,” is indicative of this. The massive feet, which extend from the ceiling of the room, dwarf viewers and hint at an ever-present burden of humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Recently, the Captain Boomer Collective delivered an unexpected object just steps away from the Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris: a beached whale. Well, it’s actually a fiberglass statue, though anyone approaching the accompanying “scientists,” life-like stench, and mass of the creature is in for an experience much like the real-life occurrence. The point is to offer both mystery and hint at the real-world problems of humans’ destruction of natural ecosystems.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether it’s a cleverly disguised speaker box or massive wall installation, Alex Yanes crafts vibrant characters and scenes out of seemingly disparate elements. The Miami-born artist says his inspiration comes from “vibrant fixtures of my environment, fatherhood, life’s circumstances, subcultures and the ability to create something out of nothing.” Often, his work is more functional than meets the eye.