by Andy SmithPosted on

Lyndal Osborne, a native of Australia now based in Canada, has long explored nature and issues surrounding the environment in her work. More recent installations, like “Curtain of Life”, specifically react to the issue of genetically modified organisms. Or as the Vernon Public Art Gallery, which hosts these works, phrases it: “The objective of this exhibition is to address the issues of (GMOs) and their impact on traditional food growers, especially in the Okanagan Valley region with its extensive fruit and vegetable production.”
(photo credit: Josh Palmer)

by Andy SmithPosted on

It’s no surprise that Saudi Arabia-born, Arizona-based artist/teacher Nathaniel Lewis was once a toy designer. Yet, although some of his newer sculptures have the bright, primary color schemes and wooden textures of old-school toys for children, the themes of series like “Little Terrors” are decidedly more complex. Depicting a TSA line, with workers, equipment, and explosives, Lewis confronts a common source of tension, anxiety, and frustration for adults.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Erika Lizée, an artist based in Los Angeles, created an installation for new exhibition “Shift and Fade” at BLAM’s Los Angeles location. The show challenged artists in San Diego, New York, and Los Angeles to “explore material as a metaphor for personal history.” In response, Lizée crafted “Seed of Life,” an installation based in acrylic on Duralar.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Zadok Ben-David, a London-based artist, chose a direct title for his latest body of work: “All the people that I saw but never met.” Yet, when you see the crowd of sculptures amassed by the artist, the work takes on a metaphysical quality. Each of the individuals, created from painted stainless steel and perspex boxes, represents a distinct personality and a new, potential relationship that never was.

by Andy SmithPosted on


To step inside a creation by The Very Many is to briefly cross over into an alien world. The New York City-based studio, led by French artist-architect Marc Fornes, makes installations and environments that can feel both functional and purely aesthetic. The studio says its specialization is “computational design and digital fabrication,” though the results can feel organic in nature. Fornes was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto’s incredible installations made out of salt are entrancing to look at with their repetitive and meticulous patterns. Yamaoto has expressed that, in viewing his zen-like designs, he hopes others may find some point in their meditation for a healing or resolution of thought. His pure white crystalline works have been installed all over the world, most recently at the French castle of Aigues-Mortes.