by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Netherlandish artist Suzan Drumman makes dazzling, playful installations that climb up walls and over people. Crystal, chrome-plated metal, precious stones, mirrors and optical glass of various sizes and colors respond and reflect their surroundings. The designs are derived from a variety of sources, including traditional Islamic geometries and Eastern mandalas, to form patterns that dance between negative and positive space. The end result is kaleidoscopic, yet balanced. However, because the individual pieces are placed on the raw surface, they are innately ephemeral. This lends the works a mystical quality.

by CaroPosted on

Scott Hove’s (Hi-Fructose Collected 3) art is much more than just three dimensional cake- it also tells story. His former studio in San Francisco, better known as “Cakeland”, featured a funhouse made of sweet, yet nightmarish cake sculptures. Now living and working in Los Angeles, Hove brings a piece of Cakeland to his current exhibition, “Pussy Jihad” at La Luz de Jesus Gallery. This exhibit plays with opposing ideals in society, while taking a look at the ethos of masculinity and femininity.

by CaroPosted on

She’s been dubbed as “the artist who can work anywhere”, and this is especially true of Crysal Wagner’s most recent installation, “Fall”. It can be found inside the campus of University of Tennessee, 4 stories of blue cascading down the school’s Art & Architecture building. “Fall” is exactly 60 feet tall, but its flowing mesh, made of party table clothes, chicken wire, and screen printing, feels almost never ending. More photos after the jump!

by CaroPosted on

Fans of recently featured duo Pip & Pop will enjoy Japanese artist Yuko Kanatani, one of their inspirations. Kanatani recently gained international momentum after the launch of her Nike sneakers and ‘Tight of the Moment’ line, which features her psychedelic designs. Her works comprise of drawings, paintings, animation, and immersive large-scale installations where one feels like they are walking into a kaleidoscope. Her bright and dazzling ornamental imagery represents varying emotions, and themes of infinity and movement.

by CaroPosted on

Tokyo-based teamLab is a group of 9 creators- artists, video, sound designers, and programmers- who transform spaces with their interactive installations. Their most recent installation “Flowers and People – Gold and Dark” is now on view at the Japan Society in New York. It is part of a larger exhibition that includes works by Manabu Ikeda and Hisashi Tenmyouya, their “Garden of Unearthly Delights”. A monster tsunami has just uprooted a major city. teamLab’s contribution represents a perpetual blooming and withering of life.

by James ScarboroughPosted on

There, but not really. That’s the context for Barcelona-born artist Jaume Plensa’s public sculptures. They might seem like intrusions. They’re large. They’re set where people congregate. And the figures themselves are huge monumental heads. They sit in business districts and in front of an art museum. They emerge from the ocean. They hover above unsuspecting pedestrians. They rest in the neighborhood that surrounds the Venice Biennale.