by Andy SmithPosted on

Rafael Varona is a illustrator, graphic designer, and self-described “loopaholic” based in Amsterdam and Berlin. The artist creates elaborate GIFs of bizarre machines and nature scenes, for both personal and commercial endeavors. The artist’s “Impossible Bottles” series, which place outlandish situations inside bottle-like vessels, is now in its second set.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bernie Wrightson, a comic book industry vet and celebrated illustrator, died on March 18. The artist was vastly influential for generations of illustrators, cited for his elaborate line work and absorbing detail. Wrightson was legend in the horror genre, in particular, mixing both the beautiful and the unsettling in his pen and brush work. Shown are images from his revered Bernie Wrightson’s Frankenstein series, adapting the classic Mary Shelley novel.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Marina Muun, an artist living in London, crafts surreal, stylized worlds in her illustrations. In both her personal and editorial work, the artist blends techniques to make dreamlike imagery out of her ideas.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Illustrator Mad Meg constructs massive drawings that contain layers upon layers. She often uses insect heads as a recurring visual theme, adapting even pieces from art history into new works and satire. But further than that, pieces like “Patriarch No. 4,” at 39 inches by 79 inches, contain bewildering detail on a micro level.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jessica Dalva, a sculptor and illustrator based in Los Angeles, has a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia titled “Dream House.” Her “three-dimensional illustrators” are framed works that allow the viewer to peek into a fictional room, with contemplative scenes and changeable lighting situations. This adds a new layer to interactivity to several of the works. Dalva was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled “The Goodlife,” Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and “social environment.”