by Andy SmithPosted on

Ban Ban 1194’s stirring illustrations offer massive mythological integrated into the landscape. The artist effectively adds a pops of red hues, often solely represented by solitary human-sized figures, in the series “Double happiness.” The poetic works are offered accompanying text with a similar tone, in this case: “The hut provided a shelter from the storm.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

With that signature, enormous red-gummed mouth, a piece by U.K. illustrator Lumps is easy to spot in both its inventiveness and eccentricity. Lumps is the working name of artist Sam Drew, who balances both a personal and commercial practice with his recognizable style. With his involvement, an everyday object can come alive with a mischievous set of chompers or a fantastical machine can be examined.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sci-fi-tinged nostalgia runs rampant in the illustrations of Paul Paetzel. The Berlin-based artist has a knack for both narrative and humor, whether it’s his comics, illustrations, or stray personal work. Paetzel has been part of the Berlin collective known as Biografiktion, also featuring artists Till Hafenbrak and Ana Albero.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The lush, dreamlike illustrations of Helena Pérez García often pair female subjects and an iteration of nature that is cerebral, rather than just a backdrop. The artist, born in Spain, is currently based in London, where she works on both personal and commercial work. She’s published two illustrated books while working for clients like Buzzfeed, Tate Publishing, Penguin Random House, BBC Proms, and several others.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The vibrant work of Egle Zvirblyte carries both humor and energy, whether following a narrative or more direct, lighthearted messages. The Lithuanian artist, currently based in London, moves between personal and illustration work. The work finds kinship in artists like Parra and fellow European artists blending Lowbrow and European artists following the flattened, direct illustrations of Rene Magritte.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Tokyo-born artist Masaaki Sasamoto creates surreal worlds bathed in gold, mixing mythological iconography and the painter’s own, distinctive figures. The butterfly is one of the most common components in Sasamoto’s work, whether enveloping his subjects or fully embedded into them. Some of these scenes also carry notes of steampunk and futuristic, manga-inspired flourishes.