by Andy SmithPosted on

Jessica Dalva, a sculptor and illustrator based in Los Angeles, has a new show at Arch Enemy Arts in Philadelphia titled “Dream House.” Her “three-dimensional illustrators” are framed works that allow the viewer to peek into a fictional room, with contemplative scenes and changeable lighting situations. This adds a new layer to interactivity to several of the works. Dalva was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled “The Goodlife,” Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and “social environment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Benze, a Hungarian artist, makes both ink drawings by hand and vector graphic prints. The artist’s hyperdetailed style works in both small and grand scales, as his murals reflect the kinetic, multitextured vibe of his works on paper. The artist has been a freelance illustrator for the past 17 years.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Javier Arres, an illustrator and graphic designer living in Madrid, Spain, crafts animated GIFs that often depict hyperdetailed, fantastical machines. The artist has his own moniker for these animations: “visual toys.” Whether it’s a wild coffee-maker or a roving entertainment bus, the artist builds GIFs that require dozens of loops to fully comprehend.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show arriving Nov. 5, Corey Helford Gallery in downtown Los Angeles hosts “Alessandra Maria & Lauren Marx.” The gallery draws a fascinating tie between the works of the two artists: “In the process of creating her own world, [Maria] and [Marx] each share in their use of powerful and traditional iconography to tell a story.” The show runs through Dec. 10.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Whether on the cover of the New Yorker, inside graphic novels, or adorning street corners, the images of Eric Drooker can be seen across the world. The New York City native has garnered a reputation as a social critic, with illustrations that comment on topics like police brutality, censorship, and the deaths of icons like Prince.