by Andy SmithPosted on


Illustrator Bill Mayer is known for his humorous, yet earnest characters and scenes, rendered with both digital and traditional means. His works often both personify and look at the real-life nature of the animal world. His gouache paintings, featured in this piece, offer a particular, absorbing characteristic.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Russia-born, New York-based artist Toma Vagner crafts dynamic, graphic-filled illustrations. Her works seem to combine the formalism of how-to guides with dynamic staging and absorbing messaging. Or, as the artist tells us: “My inspiration comes from Japanese bubble gum wraps, IKEA manuals and Russian Constructivism.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Scott M. Fischer is widely known for his illustrative works, whether it’s comic book covers, kids’ books, concept design, or game art. Yet his fine art practice, free from the confines of depicting set characters or situations, offers a different look at the artist. His hyperdetailed, dreamlike works recall both classical influences and a contemporary edge, while blending digital and traditional tools.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Artist John Mahoney crafts strange, futuristic illustrations that are marked by absorbing detail and shifting perspectives. He’s also had a hand in products from Lucasfilm, Disney, Blizzard, Hasbro Cartoon Network, and Miramax in various roles under visual development and conceptual art. Yet, perhaps his most personal project is “Zentropa,” a graphic novel “30 years in the making” that features no word bubbles and serves as a stream-of-conscious, unpredictable narrative.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Simply, London-based artist Polly Nor creates women and demons. Yet, there’s much more hidden inside the illustrations, sculptures, and other works. “Her recent body of work features a range of hand drawn, digital illustrations and sculpture work,” a statement says. “Interweaving themes of identity, female sexuality and emotional turmoil throughout her work, Nor is inspired by her own female experience of life in the internet-age. Her Illustrations often tell stories of anxiety, self doubt, and the struggle for self-love.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

C7 is the moniker of Hiroko Shiina, a Japanese artist who creates surreal and bleak illustrations with multiple tools. She’s used acrylics, ink, colored pencil, and even coffee to craft her moody works. Her works appears to be informed by dreams, the natural world, and isolated emotions.