by Andy SmithPosted on

In the series “Marquees Tropica,” illustrator Ardneks crafted works “reflecting different stages” of his personal life, with each completed with a single song on repeat. The result is a set of vibrant, wild works packed with details to decipher. The artist’s practice has included album covers for multiple acts, but this series takes a decidedly intimate slant, as compared to those pieces. The above work, titled “COASTAL JUiCEBOX” was made alongside the tune
“風の回廊(コリドー)” by Tatsuro Yamashita.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lulu Lin’s drawings subvert the human form in surprising and engrossing ways, whether in her editorial illustrations or personal work. In recent work for MAYDAY magazine, Migrant Journal, and other publications, these cascading faces fill the page and offer a tension in both repelling and garnering fixation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Anuj Shrestha’s comics and drawings encounter themes of identity and progress, in all of its competing notions. A new collection of the artist’s strips, titled “NEW FEARS,” offer some of his latest reflections. Elsewhere, the Philadelphia-based illustrator has had his work published in Wired, The New York Times, The Intercept, and other publications.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yuko Shimizu’s illustrations continue to captivate, whether they adorn books, magazine stories, comic book coveries, or gallery walls. The New York City-based, Japan-born artist is known for a diverse client list, from NIKE and The New York Times to Library of Congress. As usual, Shimizu shares thorough process documentation online, showing how she crafts her professional and personal work on a granular level.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the recent illustrations of Elif Varol Ergen, the artist dives further into the mystical with her feminine heroes and creatures, her own myths and contemporary lessons emerging. Since she was last featured on HiFructose.com (here), she released her first print publication, “A Sequence of Witches,” through Von Zos. The artist was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Furie, the artist and illustrator known for crafting (and killing) the frog character Pepe, brings his humorous and vibrant sensibilities to Nucleus Portland in a show currently running at the gallery. “Tuff Crowd” offers both crowd scenes and single portraits, all packed with Furie characters.