by CaroPosted on

Taipei, Tawain based artist Hsiao-Ron Cheng, has a certain calmness and serenity about her personality that is reflected in her digital illustrations. Her earlier work, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, portrayed wistful, fairytale-like scenes, but more recently, Cheng has shifted her focus to realistically rendered portraits of people in soft, pastel colors. For the past year, Cheng has elaborated on her portraiture by incorporating natural elements and detail in her subject’s expressions and fashion.

by CaroPosted on

We loved these striking portraits of North American animals by George Boorujy so much, that today we bring you a look at his most recent drawings. The New York based artist went viral this time last year for his incredible hyper-realistic depictions of mammals, birds, and seldom human figures in powerful images that seem to stare into your soul. Even in those images where we catch his subjects unaware in their most primal moments, there is something about them that captivates their viewer.

by CaroPosted on

Cannon Dill has been living in Oakland for over 14 years, and credits much of his time spent in the city to the development of his artistic style. He once said that the confinement of a daily routine left him daydreaming about nature. Featured on our blog, his illustration work and murals are painted in response to this push and pull between our uniquely human lifestyle and that of animals. With his upcoming exhibition “In My Own Time” at Spoke Art gallery in San Francisco, Dill takes a moment to further explore his immediate surroundings.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Akiya Kageichi is a Japanese illustrator who calls himself Golden Gravel, a name which may refer to Japanese rock gardens. His sinister jesters, lazy rulers and clandestine warriors are set within scenes full of chaotic imagery. Astrological symbols, particularly moons, are heavily prominent, suggesting the mysterious forces of dark nights are at work. In a single plane, objects morph, creating dynamic and active scenes. Kageichi reveals hidden underworlds and secret futures, in which sorcery and witchcraft pull the strings and determine what happens in the real world.

by CaroPosted on

Spanish street artist Fabio Lopez, aka Dourone, was born and raised in Madrid’s countryside where he taught himself how to paint from an early age. His combined style of graphical illustration and surrealism developed from studying artists like MC Escher, Mohlitz Philippe, Jean Giraud “Moebius”, and Giovanni Battista Piranesi. Dourone defines his unique style as “Sentipensante”, named after a style invented by Uruguayan writer Eduardo Galeano. His latest mural was painted for the first Roscella Bay Festival which was held in La Rochelle, France last month.

by CaroPosted on

Jakub Rozalski (aka “Mr. Werewolf”) is a Polish concept artist and illustrator who describes the world in his paintings as a futuristic 1920s Eastern Europe, or “1920+”. Previously featured on our blog, Rozalski’s works contrast the soft nostalgia of 19th and 20th century inspired scenery under attack against giant mecha robots. While warring nations combat mechanical beasts in epic battles that feel alien and also vaguely familiar, Polish shepards and farmers in the countryside work their land alongside wild animals. “I like to mix historical facts and situations with my own motives, ideas and visions,” he says, “I attach great importance to the details, the equipment, the costumes, because it allows you to embed painting within a specified period of time.”