by Andy SmithPosted on

Javier Arres, an illustrator and graphic designer living in Madrid, Spain, crafts animated GIFs that often depict hyperdetailed, fantastical machines. The artist has his own moniker for these animations: “visual toys.” Whether it’s a wild coffee-maker or a roving entertainment bus, the artist builds GIFs that require dozens of loops to fully comprehend.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In a new show arriving Nov. 5, Corey Helford Gallery in downtown Los Angeles hosts “Alessandra Maria & Lauren Marx.” The gallery draws a fascinating tie between the works of the two artists: “In the process of creating her own world, [Maria] and [Marx] each share in their use of powerful and traditional iconography to tell a story.” The show runs through Dec. 10.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Whether on the cover of the New Yorker, inside graphic novels, or adorning street corners, the images of Eric Drooker can be seen across the world. The New York City native has garnered a reputation as a social critic, with illustrations that comment on topics like police brutality, censorship, and the deaths of icons like Prince.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Nicole Rifkin, a Brooklyn-based artist who specializes in digital illustration, offers nostalgic, brightly hued narratives in her pieces. Rifkin, who does editorial work for The New Yorker and Medium and founded of the art magazine Ipsum, creates scenes that obscure faces and figures, rendering pops of colorful abstraction against realism.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Kenn Mortensen is a Denmark native who spends his days directing and writing children’s television shows. But during those off-hours, Mortensen finds a piece of office stationery and creates an entirely new, twisted world populated by towering monsters and fantastic creatures. Mortensen has released a couple books of post-it note scenes and other illustrations, with a dedicated Internet following that delights in his darkness.

by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Lindsay Stripling usually works in watercolor to create her playful illustrations of dreamscapes dotted with simplistic human characters, animals, and objects. But for her new series, exhibiting this week at Flatcolor Gallery in Seattle, Stripling found herself painting in oils after an 8 year break from the medium. “It’s my first real adventure with oils in 8 years and it was fun for sure,” Stripling says, “trying to carry my looseness from my watercolors into these oil paintings.”