by Andy SmithPosted on

Ron Mueck gathers 100 individual, enormous skulls for a new installation at National Gallery of Victoria’s Triennial. The sculptures in “Mass” are crafted from fiberglass and resin, and each is about a meter high. Mueck’s hyperrealist work was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using silicone, wood, resin, actual hair, and marble, Mexican sculptor Ruben Orozco crafts realistic depictions of famous figures. Created in varying scales, these entrancing figures have gone viral for their eerie reflection of humanity. He’s created sculptures depicting Frida Kahlo, Pope Francis, and other historical figures. The work may remind you of other sculptors of realistic figures, like Ron Mueck and Kazuhiro Tsuji.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Kevin Peterson is a Houston-based oil painter recognized for scenes in which wild animals and children interact against urban backdrops. One Peterson piece, “Coalition II,” was recently used as the cover for the newest Red Hot Chili Peppers record, “The Getaway.” The artist’s third solo exhibition with Thinkspace Gallery, “Sovereign,” runs through Sept. 10. Peterson last appeared on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

On the section marked “Giant Drawing” on Sergio Barrale’s website, a factoid provides a sense of the hardship that goes into each portrait: “500-700 pencils died in the process of making these works.” Look into any corner of Sergio’s “faces,” and you’ll believe him.

by CaroPosted on

Ghanaian artist Jeremiah Quarshie finds the inspiration for his paintings in his immediate environment. Living and working in Accra, the capital of Ghana, his highly realistic acrylic portraits depict models, typically ordinary women, in roles of beauty queens, businesswomen, and laborers alike. In his own words, the people in his portraits are characters representing the “foundations of society into pools of utter elegance”, 21st century workers and fictional women.

by CaroPosted on

Carole A. Feuerman’s hyperrealistic sculptures of graceful human subjects like swimmers, divers, and dancers, featured here, are undeniably lifelike. But they are also magical in their dreamy state. Her sculptures also capture something that isn’t real in the tangible sense, and that is the soul and emotion of a living person. Some call it “super-realism”, but in Feuerman’s words: “My sculptures combine both reality and illusion- I’m idealizing the human form, its not life as it really is.”