by CaroPosted on

Portrait artist Mary Jane Ansell may dress up her female subjects in the traditional European fashions of men, but they evoke a strong femininity. Her near-hyper realistic oil paintings portray young girls who step into the roles of regents and soldiers, roles that women were not eligible for. Their clothing, such as the red coat, also takes on a modern connotation in fashion as being punk and fashionably forward. However, her subjects’ personalities are more refined than tomboyish, with a delicate beauty in the way she draws eyes and features. Ansell’s newer works mix such political elements with those of nature, such as flowers and animal skulls. Take a look at new latest paintings for “Liberty’s Arc,” after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

The Winnipeg Art Gallery (WAG) in Canada is currently exhibiting some of hyperrealist sculptor Ron Mueck’s most poignant works to date. The Australia born artist, recently featured in HF Vol. 30, is well known for his larger-than-life fiberglass portrait sculptures of life’s key stages. This new exhibition, named “NGC@WAG: Ron Mueck” for its cooperation with the National Gallery of Canada, offers attendees a rare look at the process behind Mueck’s work, including his original maquettes and studies.

by CaroPosted on

In our current issue, we highlight Contemporary hyperrealist sculptor, Kazuhiro Tsuji, including his larger than life piece titled “Portrait of Abraham Lincoln”. Starting on Tuesday, June 2nd, DAX Gallery in Costa Mesa, CA will showcase the piece for public viewing. In anticipation of the event, DAX has offered us an exclusive look behind the scenes of Tsuji’s process and preparation. See more after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

One of South Korea’s eminent realist painters, Kwang-Ho Lee’s “Touch” series brings out the tactile qualities of exotic cacti. The desert plants blossom in oblong shapes in Lee’s large-scale works, inviting viewers to examine their thorns, fluff, and smooth skin. Some coiled and others upright and phallic-looking, each plant takes on its own personality. Lee’s paintings are easy to mistake for photographs at a first glance, but his stylized compositions take his work beyond straightforward documentation.

by CaroPosted on

San Francisco based artist Joel Daniel Phillips examines the characters living in his neighborhood in larger than life-sized drawings. His subjects include street vendors and the homeless, each with a unique personality that Phillips captures in hyper-realistic detail. His ongoing series explores themes like how these individuals use objects to retain a sense of home, and promotes social justice.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Italian artist Marco Grassi applies his hyperrealist painting chops to portraits that are slightly unconventional. While he paints mostly young, beautiful female subjects in traditional studio settings, his work becomes remarkable for the surreal accoutrements with which he adorns his characters. In one piece, a model’s back becomes porous with a carved, baroque design — her body hollow like a doll’s. In other paintings, he experiments with colorful body paint, tattoos, fabrics, and even a translucent, shield-like piece of futuristic jewelry. Throughout his portrait series, Grassi uses his skills with oils to create convincing illusions that make it easy for viewers to suspend disbelief.