by CaroPosted on

Portuguese multimedia artist Gustavo Fernandes portrays a parallel universe in his oil paintings. According to this essay on his work, Fernandes had a difficult childhood and once referred to himself as someone who had lost his roots. Roots are a recurring motif in his more surreal paintings, where grape vines grab hold of mysterious objects, such as spheres, and perform a strange balancing act between earth and water.

by CaroPosted on

Cuban artist Alan Manuel Gonzalez once found it inconceivable to be showing his art outside of Cuba. He has described his paintings as the result of the inescapable circumstance of being created there. Today, censorship in Cuba is the most intense in the western hemisphere. Gonzalez relies on the use of metaphor and surrealism to express both his love for his country and disdain for its problems.

by CaroPosted on

Dogs are called man’s best friend for a reason. Anyone who owns a dog understands that life long bond. For Seoul, Korea based artist Jeong Woojae, owning a dog also represents a strange combination of needing to satisfy one’s insecurities with the newfound comfort it brings. In an ongoing series of whimsical oil paintings, Jeong tells the story of a little girl growing up in Korea with her giant chihuahua. Set against vibrant and hyperrealistic backdrops inspired by the artist’s photographs of his hometown, their fairytale life feels very real.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Berlin-based American artist James Bullough splinters and fractures hyper-realistic paintings of women to open spaces through which complex and unfinished stories are revealed. The vibrancy of skin tone and naturalistic musculature in Bullough’s technique were learned through an intensive study of Old Master paintings. Bullough’s interest in Old Masters is also evident in the way in which several of his nude subjects stare at the viewer, while taking care to keep their faces at least partially concealed.

by CaroPosted on

Throughout his forty-year career, the late artist Duane Hanson made lifelike sculptures that portrayed working class Americans. For the first time since his UK retrospective in 1997, Serpentine Galleries in London is showcasing a new selection of some of the sculptor’s key pieces. Hanson is credited as a major contributor to the hyperrealism movement. His art went on to inspire contemporary artists like Ron Mueck (covered here) and can be found in major museums and collections, such as the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

by CaroPosted on

Patricia Piccinini is an Australian artist known for her unsettling sculptures of hyperrealistic hybrid creatures. Her work began as a review of biotechnology such as genetic manipulation, but has developed an emotional context over the years. For example, in her sculpture “The Long Awaited”, Piccinini seeks to form a relationship between the creatures and viewer on an empathetic level. The piece is currently on display in her exhibit “Relativity”, the first major survey of the artist’s sculptural works in Europe coinciding with Galway International Arts Festival.