by Andy SmithPosted on


Lauren Marx

In a new group show at Beinart Gallery in Australia, nature’s flora and fauna are explored. Courtney Brims, Lauren Marx, Crystal Morey and Thomas Jackson, each with his or her own distinctive approach and themes, contribute to “Botanical Bestiary,” which runs from Aug. 11 through Sept. 2 at the space. Much of the work is inspired by the terrain of Australia itself, from the native artists.

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Using the Mongol zurag style of painting, Baatarzorig Batjargal brings a contemporary and globe-spanning mentality into the century-old approach. A native of Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, the artist’s distinctive observance of tradition puts a fascinating spotlight on how his home has changed.

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Survival Research Laboratories, the group that pioneered machine performance art, appeared at this year’s Seattle Art Fair, which ended on Sunday. In several social media posts, SRL’s wild machines were shown in action. A feature on the history of the industrial art group appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 48.

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Illustrator Kima Lenaghan‘s series “Homo Conscius” imagines an evolved place “where genuine and profound consciousness is found.” The artist’s solitary drawings offer both tangible and dreamlike elements, exaggerating aspects of nature and extracting them in sparse narratives. The “Stoned Ape Hypothesis” from ethnobotanist Terrance McKenna, theorizing that early humans evolved due to psychedelic mushrooms, serves as inspiration here.

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Adehla Lee says she wants her work “to give the viewer a sense of visual pleasure through psychological intimidation.” Her wild, candy-colored acrylic paintings reinforce that notion, packing mountains of treats, abstractions, and unexpected iconography onto each canvas. The South Korea-born, New York City-based artist also works in installation and sculpture.

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An exhibition currently running at National Portrait Gallery features Michael Jackson-inspired art, with Mark Ryden‘s cover for the 1991 record “Dangerous” prominently featured. But it’s not just the original painting: Ryden crafted an entirely new work, “The King of Pop,” to house the piece.