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Fernando Rosas conjures surreal figures out of wood and other natural materials, faces and forms packed with drama emerging. Using varying types of wood with clay and metal adds to the disconcerting nature to the works, their anguish and peril seemingly organic in nature.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alexander Churchill’s riveting paintings are brimming with color, each strange scene accented by pouring hues. In “Absurdist Futility” series, in particular, offers an absorbing collection of narratives and uncomfortably close portraits.

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In Zak Ove’s sculptures, viewers find an artist using modern materials and icons to look back at centuries-old cultures. The mixed-media work moves between the futuristic and ancient in its explorations. His stated charge is to “”to reignite and reinterpret lost culture using new-world materials, whilst paying tribute to both spiritual and artistic African identity.”

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Randy Ortiz’s stirring drawings adorn gallery walls and album covers, each showing the artist’s knack for horror and surrealism. Works such as “Rejoice, for Tonight It Is a World That We Bury” (below) offer disconcerting narratives in progress, rendered in graphite.

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Mark Mulroney’s acrylics paintings humor and unsettle in their comic-inspired style and surreal sensibilities. These vibrant works pull from Pop and art history, which in many cases, carry near-aggressive results. In a show at Mrs. Gallery in New York, “The Dangers of Eden,” new pieces by the artists are shown.

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Kate Zambrano’s new paintings adorn found objects, shifting in tone and representing an evolution for the artist. Her work is part of an upcoming show at Modern Eden Gallery, “RE/FORM,” in which she disassembles the human form. The show runs Oct. 13-Nov. 2 at the San Francisco gallery.