by Andy SmithPosted on

Nathaniel Mary Quinn’s affecting mixed-media portraits recently returned in the show “Always Felt, Rarely Seen” at Almine Rech in Brussels. As with past work (Quinn was last featured on HiFructose.com here), there’s a collage-like look to the work, though all aspects are sourced through materials at the artist’s hands. Yet, as the gallery says, there’s been a more personal evolution in recent work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Peter Palfi‘s “Looney Tombs” series, the mythologies of Ancient Egyptian gods and 20th-century animation synthesize with artifacts faithful to both histories. The Hungarian artist uses bronze, wood, resin, actual mummified animals, and other materials to craft these sculptures—along with his own complete Book of the Dead. For some, it may recall Damien Hirst’s “Treasures from the Wreck of the Unbelievable,” though Palfi’s work, in concept, wholly embraces the absurd.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the recent illustrations of Elif Varol Ergen, the artist dives further into the mystical with her feminine heroes and creatures, her own myths and contemporary lessons emerging. Since she was last featured on HiFructose.com (here), she released her first print publication, “A Sequence of Witches,” through Von Zos. The artist was also featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 19.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Michael Dandley’s gouache scenes render astral—and sometimes, cataclysmic—phenomenons happening both on Earth and far beyond. Also characteristic of his work are unexpected hues in each painting, whether it’s showing degradation of the planet or explorative adventures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

David Ambarzumjan’s large strokes across scenes reveal either what once existed or what will come to pass in landscapes through time. The 20-year-old painter, based in Munich, uses oils to craft these scenes, but has also experimented in watercolors, acrylics, pastels, and other materials. The particular series above and below, titled “Brushstrokes in Time,” take on differing eras of history.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Baldur Helgason’s animation-inspired oil paintings actually function as a “self-portrait,” as the artist has created an avatar of himself that he places in situations that have notes of art history and contemporary living. Through the more exaggerated and duplicated aspects of this character, he’s able to explore cerebral and personal themes.