by Andy SmithPosted on

With Crystal Morey‘s newest handmade porcelain sculptures, the artist takes influence from 18th century European art history. “Lush Anthesis,” a body of work in a new show at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, contains hybrid creations made from humans, flora, and fauna. Morey was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The watercolor paintings of Turkish artist Yiğit Can Alper carry a ghostly quality, their creatures disappearing into sparse backdrops. Alper’s drab figures and structures seem to be part of a dilapidated world. And the textures of the material render each component as a temporary apparition.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Charlie Immer

As we get closer to the opening of “Hi-Fructose Presents: The Art of the Mushroom,” the group show at The Compound Gallery that explores the fungus that’s inspired artists for centuries, organizers offer more snippets and previews of the show each day. Take the interactive, moving “Cradle of Life” throne (below), which is just about ready to host revelers. See Part 1 of our preview of the show here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Keyes

With wildly varied takes on the natural world, painters Josh Keyes and Lisa Ericson bring two separate shows to Thinkspace Projects in Culver City. Keyes was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here, and Ericson was last mentioned on the site here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Neva Hosking to craft biographical drawings on scraps and unexpected surfaces is rooted in a time long before having her formal training, yet that practice has endured. This approach “built an understanding that a broken and fractured viewpoint often presents a more accurate and multi-faceted view of whatever subject needs to be explored,” she says. The result shows a prism that represents a complex, ever-changing humanity.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jos. A Smith’s dreamlike paintings move between elegance and cacophony. His horse-riders, specifically, carry a quality have a surreal, yet granular quality that invites close inspection. Part of the artist’s work his rooted in his practice of “of trance techniques learned from the Nyngmapa sect of Tibetan Buddhism, research psychologists, anthropologists, and shamans with my own dream records to make that membrane between my waking state and my unconscious more permeable.”