by Andy SmithPosted on


Joseph Lee

The 53rd Volume of Hi-Fructose is coming soon! This issue features the paintings of Laurie Lee Brom, the mixed media works of Tanmaya Bingham, a retrospective on the art of Robert Proch, the woven sculptures of Sandra deGroot, Justin Lovato and the atomic soup of the natural universe, the psychedelic 8-bit inspired worlds of Jess Johnson, the art of Pissing People Off with sculptor David Cerny, the textural paintings of cover artist Joseph Lee, the prismatic tunnel vision of artist Jen Stark, plus a 16-page insert on the drawings of Nathan Reidt printed on toothy paper, and more! Reserve your copy here, or you can subscribe to our magazine with a one-year subscription or a two-year subscription.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Having indexed many of the monsters he’s created over the past several years, illustrator and fine artist Stan Manoukian continues to create riveting scenes with these creatures in their natural habitats. Though the artist has a talent in color, his narratives take on a particularly absorbing quality when rendered only in graphite or inks.

by Andy SmithPosted on

VILE’s illusionary murals often use the artist’s own moniker as windows into fictional places, whether a continuation of the inhabited space or another dimension. Elsewhere, the artist presents figures that live along the contours of a room or outdoor locale. In recent years, he’s participated in projects in Germany, Portugal, London, and beyond.

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Christine Kim’s practice is a blend of painting, drawing, and sculpture. The Toronto-based artist’s experimentations with layering and cutting works moves between both graphite drawings and painting. Each carry ghostly notes, each offering their own considerations of negative space.

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In the work of Lucas Lasnier, also known as PARBO, geometric forms collide with and infiltrate our reality. Whether adorning a wall or a page, Lasnier’s penchants for both the abstract and the realistic are at play. And Lasnier’s background in urban art comes through even in his more commercial ventures.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armed with a pair of scissors, Huntz Liu’s multilayered paper collages have the viewer guessing which geometric forms offer actual depth or just give the illusion of it. With names like “Color Chasm,” “Gravity,” and “Boxy Configurations,” the artist acknowledges that playful deception that carries across the works in his new show at Thinkspace Projects, which runs through Oct. 5 at the space.