by Andy SmithPosted on


Cover: Bea Szenfeld Anderson (From the White Collection). Photo by Joel Rhodin.

We’re pleased to announce an interesting upcoming book project that is now available for pre-order here, and arrives in early 2018. Hi-Fructose: New Contemporary Fashion is an experimental look into the worlds of wearable art and fashion; where technology, sculpture, experimental materials, and other-worldly viewpoints have sparked a distinctly different kind of new contemporary fashion that bends genres and sparks new conversations, presenting atypical fashion through a Hi-Fructose lens. Published by Cernunnos. Edited and designed by Attaboy.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Fiona Roberts crafts unsettling sculptures that insert human body parts into unlikely places. Whether its drapes, wallpaper, or closely placed pillows, the Australian artist’s work adds a ghostly quality to the objects that surround us. In a past statement, the artist offers insight into why she approaches her practice with this sensibility:

by Andy SmithPosted on

An ever-present quality in the illustrations and gallery work of J.A.W. Cooper is a blend of seemingly disparate influences. Her surreal pieces often carry a bit of fashion, a dash of fantasy, mythology and the natural world, and often, a bold femininity. The results are enchanting expression of Cooper’s diverse vision. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Belinda Wiltshire crafts stirring oil paintings, carrying abstractions or other surreal touches that add intimacy to each portrait. The Melbourne-based painter works primarily in the figurative, and at times, fellow artists appear in her pieces. Peers like Tamara Dean and The Huxleys have been depicted by Wiltshire.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bangkok-born artist Rook Floro mixes installation, sculpture, performance art, and other approaches for a singular, visceral experience. A statement says that he “draws from contention in his own life, which he likes to visualize in different series of artwork.” Recently, his “Blastard” experiences express a particularly vibrant and personal version of the artist.

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The paintings of Brett Ferry, created using acrylics and oil on board, defy in both materials used and the components depicted. The blending of vibrant abstractions and natural forms feel like clashes of realities. The Australian artist’s works may deceive and appear as digital paintings, yet this simply part of the author’s charge.