by Andy SmithPosted on

Nora Fok’s blend of textile and jewelry art results in otherworldly pieces, implementing a variety of materials and processes for statements that resemble little else in wearable fashion. Despite their progressive, sometimes futuristic look, the pieces often implement age-old approaches: braiding, weaving, and knitting are used to string together hundreds of elements like nylon monofilament and beads.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the La Merced neighborhood in San Cristóbal de las Casas in Chiapas, Mexico, costumed characters hit the streets to welcome the feast day of Our Lady of La Merced and reflect the sins of the wearer. In Diego Moreno’s photo series “Guardians of Memory,” he navigates this tradition in his old neighborhood and explores converging cultures by placing these monsters in domestic situations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

John Jacobsmeyer’s plywood backdrops contain scenes that explore fantastical narratives, and lately, video game culture in particular. In his debut show at Jonathan Levine Projects, titled “Great Feats and Defeats,” continues a fascination with wood for the artist that reaches back to his childhood. The artist says that “rotary sawn pine plywood is cheap yet durable and along with being used as sub-flooring and fencing for construction sites. It’s also the material twelve-year-old children will use to build clubhouses in the woods where they’ll rule their own kingdoms, wage wars and rebuild bigger and wilder each time.” Jacobsmeyer was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Travis Louie’s creatures carry Victorian and Edwardian vibes, rendered in the artist’s distinctive, fantastical style. A show at Creatura House, the new Seattle venue from Roq La Rue Gallery founder Kirsten Anderson, collects a new set of paintings and drawings from the artist. Louie was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. He and artist Travis Lampe also recently created the art for the card throwing/tile game Vampires vs. Unicorns: Floor War, constructed by game designer Jim DuBois and Hi-Fructose co-founder Attaboy.

by Andy SmithPosted on


In a new show at Itinerrance Gallery in Paris, Inti offers a new collection of works on canvas and installations that take influence from his massive murals across the world. The artist’s surreal scenes combine textures and iconography from cultures and histories from across the globe. The show runs through March 17 at the gallery.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono creates vessels born from several, leaf- and flower-like forms. These porcelain pieces carry the rich textures and shapes of their inspiration, even in their interiors. The artist cites both the traditions of Europe and Japan in her approach. Based in the U.K., the artist studied in Japan and Denmark before moving her practice.