by Andy SmithPosted on

The paintings of Jean Paul Langlois blend memories of 1970s sci-fi and Westerns of his youth, while also exploring the artist’s connection to his own native and non-native roots. Within his Old West scenes, you may also see a character from “Planet of the Apes” or references to Saturday morning cartoons. His “Origin Stories” series, in particular, re-imagines “mundane family stories and re-interpreting them through a cinematic lens.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Micha Huigen’s illustrations dissect and reassemble everyday objects into surreal machines. The artist’s work, both in personal and commissioned forms, are marked by elegant and bold linework. Huigen has crafted album art, music videos, magazines, and other editorial work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daiva Kairevičiūtė, an artist from Lithuania, crafts drawings that reflect on femininity— through the various stages of life and shades of identity. Her figures, often rendered in black, contrast with the pops of floral hues or creatures that inhabit her works.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Mitsuru Watanabe

Here’s a sneak peek at the next issue of Hi-Fructose, in mailboxes and on shelves around the world in January! This issue features: the paintings of Eunjeong Choi, the paintings of Riika Sormunen, a retrospective on the art and life of Eyvind Earle, the narrative quilts of Bisa Butler, the geometric B-Boy sculptures of Taku Obata, the dense digital collages of Luis Toledo, cover artist Mitsuru Watanabe’s take on classic paintings, the figurative paintings of Kati Heck, and a review on a new documentary on special effects legend Phil Tippett! Plus: a 16-page insert on the drawings of Ozabu printed on fine toothy paper, and more. Reserve a copy here—or even better, get a one-year subscription here or a two-year subscription here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Miami Art Week and all of its accompanying fairs come to a close on Sunday, including SCOPE Miami Beach, of which we’re a media partner. In this post, we’ll take a look at some of the sights found around this massive fair. You’ll see some past artists and galleries featured on our website and print issues—as well as some new faces.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Amy Brener’s “Omni-Kit” sculpture series, everyday objects and imagery are reprocessed into totem-like sculptures that speak to ritual and memory. These works are highlighted in a new show at Jack Barrett Gallery titled “Consolarium,” a word the artist created for the place where these objects and figures across time collide into these single objects. Materials include urethane resin and foam, silicone, pigment, and more. The show runs through Dec. 20.