by Andy SmithPosted on


DFace

A collaboration between Subliminal Projects in Los Angeles and New York City’s Faction Art Projects has produced “Visual Language,” a bicoastal exhibition with both spaces carrying works from major contemporary artists. The charge is “investigating various approaches to the use of words and images in art and Western Culture,” with artists including Jenny Holzer, Guerrilla Girls, Scott Albrecht, Ramsey Dau, Wayne White, Betty Tomkins, DFace, Ed Ruscha, Shepard Fairey, Nathaniel Russell, Chad Kouri, and Umar Rashid.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Utilizing the traditional method of woodcarving of “Ichibokuzukuri,” using a single block of wood for sculptures, Koji Tanada crafts both enigmatic and elegant figures. In a show running at Mizuma Art Gallery, “Unclothed and Clothed,” the artist’s latest figures and busts are displayed. Between each work, the women crafted by the artist exhibit power, grace, and vulnerability.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The bold, dynamic oil paintings of French artist Cedrix Crespel use atypical perspective, a graphical approach, and abstractions. The subjects and backdrops recall the femme fatale of comic books and street art. In a statement, the artist offers insight into the ever-present female form in his works.

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David Krovblit’s pop surrealist collages explore consumerism, sexuality, and other social themes. His “Porthole” series, in particular, juxtaposes retro exploration gear, floral arrangements, and Western iconography. His work is part of the current collage group show “Mèlange” at Arch Enemy Arts, running until Aug. 25.

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The “live sculptures” of Roman Ermakov combine fashion, fine art, and installation work, each offering an energy and vibrancy powered by the humans bearing his works. These creations from the Moscow-based artist enliven both the runaway and public spaces. His recent work, as shown, takes influence from the costume parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s, where these artists’ radical ideas in architecture and sculpture were also channeled.

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Elizabeth Glaessner utilizes water-dispersed pigment and inks in her absorbing, vibrant scenes and portraits. The works, moving reality and dreamlike settings, explore humanity in their imperfect forms. Often, her work is pulling from both mythology and her own experiences in her paintings.