by Andy SmithPosted on

Germany native Svenja Maaß creates paintings that are understood in waves, bringing heads to turn and speculate on each’s interworkings. Creatures seem to exist on differing planes than other components of the piece. Or as one gallery says, she describes her methodology “as a process which forces her and us to rethink again and again. Only slowly are things allowed to grow together.”

by Andy SmithPosted on


The 164-acre park at North Carolina Museum of Art’s Ann and Jim Goodnight Museum Park gains a few new occupants this spring, in the form of two enormous sculptures. Jaume Plensa’s “Awilda & Irma,” a twofer, steel mesh set of heads, and Jaime Hayon’s interactive, rocket-like “SCULPT. C” were recently installed at the museum. On April 21, NCMA marks installations with the event Hoopla: Party in the Park.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In the past, Jillian Dickson’s colored pencil drawings blended flowers and female anatomy. With “My Undies,” the artist’s realistic, vibrant style highlights a different brand of intimate imagery. The artist says that “the reality of women’s underwear seems to be one big dirty secret.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Daniel Ramirez’s “A Series of Shots” captures surreal, unsettling characters and situations in his photography-based illustrations. These vibrant captures mix the humorous and the grim, toying with vintage and children’s story iconography with dreamlike twists. The open-ended series aims to “shoot any individual, object of essence, animals, and any disguised human.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Rafael Varona is a illustrator, graphic designer, and self-described “loopaholic” based in Amsterdam and Berlin. The artist creates elaborate GIFs of bizarre machines and nature scenes, for both personal and commercial endeavors. The artist’s “Impossible Bottles” series, which place outlandish situations inside bottle-like vessels, is now in its second set.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lana Crooks uses hand-dyed wool to craft the insides and outsides of the natural world. From a distance, these pieces appear to constructed of fur and bone. But upon closer inspection, the artist’s meticulous blending of wool, found objects, and other fabrics comes into focus. Crooks sometimes uses actual specimens from Chicago’s natural history museum collections for inspiration in making her “faux specimens and soft curiosities.”