by Andy SmithPosted on

Grip Face’s graphical, object-based art has appeared in museums and galleries and on walls and everyday objects across the globe. The artist works with both familiar and abstract imagery in his pieces, which take notes from comic book art and whatever structure they’re painted on. Much of the work, event in its most unsettling alterations of its human subjects, is teeming with humor.

by Andy SmithPosted on

British illustrator Sam Richwood blends both sparse and lush details into his works. In the “Galaxy Garden” series, the futurescapes and romanticism of his scenes benefit from both approaches. The artist says that he hopes his worlds are able to “suggest a place beyond the canvas.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

At Burlington City Arts, Crystal Wagner‘s first-ever work existing in both the interior and exterior of a space comes with “Traverse.” Wagner is known for biomorphic creations that span sculpture, prints, and installations. This exhibition, running through Oct. 2, features a site-specific installation that “grows from floor to ceiling and emerges outside to meander across the exterior façade.” Wagner was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Philadelphia artist Nathan Reidt crafts scenes in which everyday objects and beings garner growths and mutations. His drawings, in particular, carry a particular eeriness in their starkness, the artist’s abilities with light adding depth to each creation.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Parker S. Jackson says he tries to strike a balance between “uncanny and realism” in his portraits, which carry notes of both humor and dark art. One of the artist’s greatest strengths is in his ability to create varying, perplexing textures with both digital and traditional materials. We asked the artist about his influences, which he says range from centuries-old work to contemporary pop culture.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Yoon Ji Seon‘s embroidered portraits blend fiber and photography. Much of work consists of self-portraits, with varying degrees of emotions, abstraction, and detail. Her “Rag Face” series goes back to 2006, when she started experimenting with these mixed-media pieces.