by Andy SmithPosted on

Kathleen Neeley’s linocut prints are infused with varying cultures across time, yet feel wholly contemporary in reflection. The artist looks at our relationship to the Earth, femininity, and other personal subjects while maintaining the elements and motifs of myths.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sarah Ball’s oil paintings, subtle in their complexity, are intended for the viewer to encounter the portrait’s subject intimately. The practice of physiognomy, or judging the character of a person just from their facial features or expressions, has long been a subject of fascination for the artist. In efforts like her current Anima Mundi show “Themself,” she culls her subjects from historic photographic archives, social media, and beyond. “These source images become a starting point for a methodical process of understanding, assumption and translation, where the aesthetic ‘mask’ and what lies beneath become the focus of engagement,” the gallery says.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ed Merlin Murray’s riveting drawings both enact and emulate motion. His movable creations, in particular, feel akin to the work of Terry Gilliam in his animation days. In his intricate line drawings, Murray offers entrancing and illusionary explorations of the human form.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Painter, animator, and muralist Robert Proch has passed away at the age of 33. The Polish artist was known for a dynamic blend of the figurative, architectural elements, shifting perspectives, and an innovative, kinetic energy coursing through his works. Collaborators KIRK Gallery and Thinkspace Projects both confirmed his passing after a message was posted on his Instagram account Thursday evening.

by Andy SmithPosted on

In his first exhibition in Hungary, Dmitry Kawarga’s “post-human” sculptures and installations reflect on humanity’s vulnerability. His “Anthropocentrism Toxicosis” series, in particular, is on display at the Ferenczy Museum, with works built with polymers and occasionally, usage of 3D-printing processes. The exhibition runs through Sept. 15.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Armed with two centuries of source material and an X-ACTO knife, Michael Tunk’s “Analog Collage” series offers strange, absorbing worlds and portraits. In his “The Unknown Rider” series, seen below, he offers ghostly depictions of the Old West. Elsewhere, he uses unexpected building blocks in his portraits—such as tiny versions of the creature he’s depicting.