by CaroPosted on

Paris, France based artist Amandine Urruty has always overflowed her whimsical drawings with fantastical characters. First featured on our blog here, Urruty is unique in her near exclusive use of the pencil medium. There is something about a pencil’s ‘primitive’ and simple nature that initially attracted her to it. Her illustrations exhibit a remarkable control of the medium, and despite its easy use, she says, she is able to embellish her work with detail and varied palette. Most recently, her palette is almost entirely monochromatic black and white.

by CaroPosted on

Taisuke Mohri has been drawing since his teens, eventually leading him to study industrial design. It should come as no surprise that he specialized in the design of elaborate objects with visual patterns, elements he now adapts in his drawing work. We previously featured Mohri’s realistic pencil renderings of mysterious young people on our blog. He has said that he finds it disturbing when something appears too perfect or real. Mohri’s latest works intend to interrupt “perfect” people and creations in nature with smudges and cracks.

by Nathan SpoorPosted on

Jeremy Nichols is an artist hailing from Portland who creates graphite on paper works that he often refers to as “alien worlds.” In his youth, Nichols spent time traveling between upstate New York and Tokyo, which he says created a strong sense of displacement within him. He takes these memories of unsettled feelings to create worlds that feel otherworldly, using recognizable patterns and textures to create layered drawings of floating clusters of energy. Nichols wants his viewers to walk away questioning the beauty beyond their immediate world and take a closer look at the things that they see everyday – things they tend to overlook.

by CaroPosted on

Montreal based artist Nathalie Lagacé plainly draws ties between humans and nature in her latest graphite series of hybrid baby-animals. Titled “Legacy”, her drawings portray screaming newborn babies who express the same emotional rollercoaster as our relationship to the environment. In a way, they are almost comical in their bizarre pairings of animals like babies with chicken legs and “duck lips”, others posed like a Thanksgiving turkey ready for roasting.

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Attention all artists! In partnership with our friends at Squarespace, Hi-Fructose will be highlighting five artists who are currently using Squarespace for their website or portfolio, to be featured on HiFructose.com. This week we are featuring Newcastle, England based artist Vanessa Foley, who expresses an affinity for wildlife in her realistic portraits of animals. She grew up in the Northumberland countryside surrounded by nature which left a lasting impression on her. In her artist statement, she writes, “My love of nature and art are inseparable, and I could never imagine one without the other.”

by CaroPosted on

New york-based Dominican artist Samuel Gomez (first featured here) creates enormous detailed renderings with a steam-punk aesthetic. Using graphite and ink, Gomez’s work offers a glimpse into a mysterious dystopian society dominated by machinery. His drawings are particularly well known for their impressive larger than life size, with some pieces measuring up to 18 feet long. His latest pieces, titled “Decrypted Savants” and “Oasis” will be revealed on July 31st at Mike Wright Gallery in Denver.