by Andy SmithPosted on

Matt Gordon is a mixed-media artist based in Plymouth, Mich., where he crafts both surreal acrylic paintings and graphite drawings. In these images, skeleton characters, bat-human hybrids, and other creatures interact and frolic in different scenarios. Or, as the artist puts it, his works in both mediums “take place in the same dreamy world of happier times.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Houston-born artist Shayne Murphy blends realism and the abstract, with his oil paintings featuring explosions of graphite. Using sharpened backdrops and geometric flourishes, the artist tilts perspectives and toys further with reality. Murphy currently has a solo show titled “Fluorescent Gray” at Anya Tish Gallery in Houston, which runs through Nov. 12.

by CaroPosted on

In Laurie Lipton’s recent works, featured here, the artist take us into a world that feels overwhelmed with technology. It is a place where wires, screens, emojis and other aspects of our modern day communication devices define this world’s movement and style. She calls it a “Techno Rococo” of sorts, the title and basis of her latest series of drawings which debuted over the weekend at Ace Gallery in Los Angeles.

by CaroPosted on

American artist Renée French draws endearing portraits of bizarre creatures that look like dark versions of fairytale characters. First featured in an insert for Hi-Fructose Vol. 35, French considers herself a “graphite addict”, who keeps a child-like innocence about her adult graphic novelist and comics rooted works. Her fantastical imagery is in part inspired by Netherlandish painter Hieronymus Bosch, especially the macabre and nightmarish depictions within his fanciful world. She will debut her latest series at La Luz de Jesus gallery in Los Angeles on October 2nd.

by CaroPosted on

Paris, France based artist Amandine Urruty has always overflowed her whimsical drawings with fantastical characters. First featured on our blog here, Urruty is unique in her near exclusive use of the pencil medium. There is something about a pencil’s ‘primitive’ and simple nature that initially attracted her to it. Her illustrations exhibit a remarkable control of the medium, and despite its easy use, she says, she is able to embellish her work with detail and varied palette. Most recently, her palette is almost entirely monochromatic black and white.

by CaroPosted on

Taisuke Mohri has been drawing since his teens, eventually leading him to study industrial design. It should come as no surprise that he specialized in the design of elaborate objects with visual patterns, elements he now adapts in his drawing work. We previously featured Mohri’s realistic pencil renderings of mysterious young people on our blog. He has said that he finds it disturbing when something appears too perfect or real. Mohri’s latest works intend to interrupt “perfect” people and creations in nature with smudges and cracks.