by CaroPosted on

Tomorrow, California based graffiti artist Doze Green will celebrate his fifth solo at Jonathan LeVine Gallery, “Out of Knowhere”. On the show’s concept, Green shares, “This is my interpretation of the soul’s journey. Leaving behind illusion, ego and material to connect with the self and converge with the source of life.” A recent video takes viewers behind the scenes, where pieces from Green’s rural life are mirrored in his paintings. Among his inspirations are the seasons, reincarnation and the natural cycles of human, plant and animal life.

by CaroPosted on

These works by Japanese artist Tenmyouya Hisashi represent uniquely Japanese aesthetics, mixed with modern, vulgar depictions of sub-culture icons. His paintings of vehicles and Gundam samurai on gold leaf are only a few characters he’s refashioned in the styles of his predecessors. By combining traditional Japanese symbols, his paintings have a spirit that is old and contemporary at the same time.

by CaroPosted on

Los Angeles based artists and friends Bumblebee Loves You (featured here) and KETS recently completed a mural that unites their aesthetics of ‘graffiti’ and ‘street art’. Bumblebee incorporates social messages into his stencil graffiti and street installations, while KETS represents with spray-painted graffiti. The image is of a bee-striped boy playing with his toy train next to tracks alongside the 110 freeway.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Both based in Berlin by way of Australia, Two One and Reka (see our recent studio visit here) are exhibiting together at StolenSpace Gallery in London in two concurrent solo shows: Reka’s “Trip the Light” and Two One’s “The Hunted Hunter’s Head.” Inspired by the graceful movements of dancers from a young age, Reka (whose mother was a ballerina) presents a series of paintings that pay homage to the fluid, abstract shapes the body can make. His Cubist-inspired paintings might have one imagining a toe-tapping soundtrack of jazz or even the swell of a symphony, but Reka tempers these allusions to older, more traditional art forms with gritty paint textures that evoke his graffiti roots.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City is “Cruel Summer,” an extensive showcase of artists with ties to the international graffiti and street art scenes. The show is curated by Roger Gastman, a graffiti writer turned filmmaker and author whose extensive credits include consulting producer of Banksy’s Exit Through the Giftshop and co-curator of the major street art exhibition “Art in the Streets” at LA’s MoCA. With humorous, playful works by Dabs Myla, Finok and HuskMitNavn, neon dreamscapes by Maya Hayuk and POSE and black-and-white flash tattoo drawings by Mike Giant, the exhibition demonstrates the broad scope of artists making their marks on the streets of cities across the world.

by CaroPosted on

Bigger is better, unless you’re Slinkachu. The UK-based artist (previously posted on our Tumblr here) started placing his tiny figures around London back in 2006. Slinkachu sources these from a company that supplies model train products, and vintage 1960s toys, which he embellishes for his own purposes. He’s a big fan of artist Chris Ware, whose works also tend to use a vivid color palette and are full of meticulous detail. When we say tiny, we mean barely a centimeter high. Slinkachu has to use a magnifying glass to add details to his little people. If it wasn’t for his compelling photo series, they would be left completely undiscovered to passersby. He has photographed these humorous, miniature scenes all over the world in places like Cape Town, Doha, Berlin, and New York, to name a few. During the course of documenting his work, Slinkachu began to question: Just what happens to art that’s been abandoned on the street?